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Topic: Learning how to read schematic (Read 5485 times) previous topic - next topic

sterretje

Alternative that I learned was that crossings of lines were not a connection. To indicate a connection, one used something like below

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If you understand an example, use it.
If you don't understand an example, don't use it.

Electronics engineer by trade, software engineer by profession. Trying to get back into electronics after 15 years absence.

Hutkikz

#31
Jan 20, 2016, 07:34 am Last Edit: Jan 20, 2016, 07:35 am by Hutkikz
Constantly trolling Radio Shack for those kits and a basic electronics course in Vo-tech (High school level  vocational training) is how how I first got interested.

After getting back into it after all these yrs I still sometimes find myself making "humps"

@ YoungSteve
I have to use big blobs to make sure I don't miss 'em too.

OldSteve

Alternative that I learned was that crossings of lines were not a connection. To indicate a connection, one used something like below

Code: [Select]

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Yeah, right. An offset would make them easier for me to see.
Still I'm an old dog, so it's hard to teach me new tricks, so they say. :D

The big advantage of the method that Larry shows is speed, of course. It's much faster than either of our methods, at the cost of being slightly harder to read sometimes if the 'connection' blobs are too small.
Alternative that I learned was that crossings of lines were not a connection. To indicate a connection, one used something like below

Code: [Select]

   |
   |
---------------
       |
       |

Please do not PM me for help. I am not a personal consultant.
And others will benefit as well if you post your question publicly on the forums.

OldSteve

@ YoungSteve
I have to use big blobs to make sure I don't miss 'em too.
Ha. Glad to hear I'm not the only one. :)
Please do not PM me for help. I am not a personal consultant.
And others will benefit as well if you post your question publicly on the forums.

larryd

@YoungSteve
Quote
My problem is very poor eyesight
Same here.

BTW, being in our golden years, where is all this gold they promised.
.
No technical PMs.
If you are asked a question, please respond with an answer.
If you are asked for more information, please supply it.
If you need clarification, ask for help.

TomGeorge

Hi,
Quote
After getting back into it after all these yrs I still sometimes find myself making "humps"
If I am making a first run mudmap when reverse engineering, I revert back to doing that at times too.

Tom.... :)
Everything runs on smoke, let the smoke out, it stops running....

OldSteve

@YoungSteveSame here.

BTW, being in our golden years, where is all this gold they promised.
.
Yeah. I certainly didn't get my share.
Please do not PM me for help. I am not a personal consultant.
And others will benefit as well if you post your question publicly on the forums.

sterretje

BTW, being in our golden years, where is all this gold they promised.
Yeah. I certainly didn't get my share.
Golden crowns on your teeth :D If you can't find it there, check in all your ICs; bonding wires between die and pins can be gold wire.
If you understand an example, use it.
If you don't understand an example, don't use it.

Electronics engineer by trade, software engineer by profession. Trying to get back into electronics after 15 years absence.

OldSteve

Golden crowns on your teeth :D If you can't find it there, check in all your ICs; bonding wires between die and pins can be gold wire.
Ha. Yeah, I've also got a fair bit of electronic gear with thin gold plating, SMA connectors, gold-plated headers etc, but even if I scrape it all off, it wouldn't amount to what I consider my share. :D
(And no teeth, with or without gold crowns. :( )
Please do not PM me for help. I am not a personal consultant.
And others will benefit as well if you post your question publicly on the forums.

raschemmel

What ? Are we in an old folks home now?

I hope you guys are wearing diapers...
Arduino UNOs, Pro-Minis, ATMega328, ATtiny85, LCDs, MCP4162, keypads,<br />DS18B20s,74c922,nRF24L01, RS232, SD card, RC fixed wing, quadcopter

Grumpy_Mike

#40
Jan 20, 2016, 11:57 am Last Edit: Jan 20, 2016, 11:58 am by Grumpy_Mike
I much prefer the gap indicating a crossing.


OldSteve

I much prefer the gap indicating a crossing.
Right. That's another method that's easy to see, (for us 'old folk's home' people).
Please do not PM me for help. I am not a personal consultant.
And others will benefit as well if you post your question publicly on the forums.

pwillard

#42
Jan 20, 2016, 01:57 pm Last Edit: Jan 20, 2016, 02:07 pm by pwillard
Hopefully, the small differences seen between North American, European and Far East conventions will not trip you up. They are after all trivial differences that once you know them, it's not hard to read.


R2 is predominantly EU style resistor while the squiggle line is US in R3.

Note that R2 reads 4.7K  by placing the K where the decimal is... this is also more common on non-USA drawings and is really handy when a design is reproduced many times or has reduced resolution... since the decimal dots tend to disappear.
 
C1 is a typical EU style non-polarized capacitor.  C2 is also EU style.  US style caps will sometimes have a curvature to one side (the side facing the most negative potential) although the necessity of that convention is pretty much gone.  The far east style polarized  capacitor will sometimes have a larger negative terminal with diagonal lines...  no special meaning there... just that it is electrolytic and that is the negative potential side of the polarity while USA style caps will have just 2 parallel lines with the positive terminal marked with a '+' sign.





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