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Topic: Controlling 120VAC Remote Control Switch (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

jmvar

I'd like to control this 120vac switch using an arduino:

http://www.amazon.com/DUST-COLLECTOR-REMOTE-CONTROL-SWITCH/dp/B0013EI06S

I opened it up and see that it uses a 832-1C-C-12VDC relay.

I think I have several choices and want to get input on which method I should choose, how to do it, and any other methods I am missing.  Here is what I was thinking as far as my choices:

- buy a spare remote and hard wire the arduino into it
- hard wire and control the relay inside the switch using the arduino
- hard wire and control the RF input inside the switch

I think tapping into the RF input inside the switch will be the best method because I don't have to buy a new remote.  I don't think I will be able to turn the system off with the remote if I tap directly into the relay but I am not sure.

Any input is appreciated.  Thanks.

gpsmikey

You could either put the control from the Arduino in series with the output of the remote which would give you a "AND" function where both would have to be ON to run it or put the Arduino in parallel with the RF portion which would give you an "OR" function where either one (or both) could turn it on - plus and minus to both options. 

CAUTION: One thing I would be very careful of - often things like that with built in circuits (like the RF receiver/control) because they are buried in the housing, are NOT isolated from the 110 - the power supply for the receiver may not use a transformer for isolation, so it may be hot electrically in there which could be bad news for you and your arduino.  You might want to consider looking into an optical isolator as part of your solution.
mikey
-- you can't have too many gadgets or too much disk space !
old engineering saying: 1+1 = 3 for sufficiently large values of 1 or small values of 3

DVDdoug

Quote
- buy a spare remote and hard wire the arduino into it
That might be the best solution.   A relay is an electrically-controlled electrically-isolated switch, so a relay controlled by the Arduino should be able to replace/duplicate the mechanical switch in the remote.


Or, get an X-10 controlled outlet (or use some other home automation standard).    

There are a variety of timers/controllers/remotes for home automation.  Some of these can be controlled with a computer, cell phone, or over the Internet, etc.   Or, it's possible to build you own Arduino based controller to "talk to" various outlets, switches, dimmers, etc.   Note that you can't communicate directly  with an X-10 outlet over the Internet, but you can communicate with a controller/hub, which then sends signals to the outlets/switches.

(I've got a home automation set-up, but I didn't build any of it myself.)

jmvar

This is for my friend's wood shop and he already has the remote control system.  We want to automate it to turn on whenever a machine is turned on.  We are doing this with vibration sensors on each machine, we have it tested and everything is working as far as the Arduino sensing when each machine is on.  Now we just have to program it so that the Arduino turns on the switch, which will in turn, turn on the dust collector.

Looks like the easiest way to do this will be to just buy a spare remote and hard wire the arduino to the remote.  Spare remotes can be had for $20:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00004S9AL/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_nS_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=11LVFWP24JJBP&coliid=IOQSQLRC4VHPE

I did open up the switch and I saw the relay, that is how I got the part number off of it.  I also saw the RF antenna and the little receiver for it.  I may do a little experimenting to see if I can't find the signal from the RF receiver to the relay on the board and tap into that.  I will try to get some pictures posted to see if you guys can guide me on where the take readings with the multimeter.

gpsmikey

There are load sensing switches designed for that (Rockler.com carries them).  You plug it into the outlet, then plug the machine into the gadget.  When the machine is turned on, it turns the dust collection system on (could have used that yesterday making a bunch of things for my daughter with a router and template.  LOTS of sawdust!!).
mikey
-- you can't have too many gadgets or too much disk space !
old engineering saying: 1+1 = 3 for sufficiently large values of 1 or small values of 3

jmvar

There are load sensing switches designed for that (Rockler.com carries them).  You plug it into the outlet, then plug the machine into the gadget.  When the machine is turned on, it turns the dust collection system on (could have used that yesterday making a bunch of things for my daughter with a router and template.  LOTS of sawdust!!).
Something like this?: http://www.rockler.com/i-socket-110m-tool-and-vacuum-switch

We looked at those, they are great if you have 2-3 machines max and then it starts getting expensive.  They also don't work very well with a central dust collection system like we have.

The shop is a large 2 car garage that has 7 machines (and growing) spread out all over the garage that are all piped to a central dust collection system.  We also want to automate the blast gates after we get the auto run up and running.

gpsmikey

Yeah, that was the one I was thinking of (it doesn't work for me since my dust collection system is 2hp 220v).  One thing to consider would be to have one of those switches set up with a multiple outlet plugged into it and then run cords to the other machines since you seldom run more than one at a time.  One of these days, I need to work on getting my shop set up that way since I have both 110 and 220 machines in it (then there are the two arc welders ...  :o   )
mikey
-- you can't have too many gadgets or too much disk space !
old engineering saying: 1+1 = 3 for sufficiently large values of 1 or small values of 3

jmvar

OK so I decided just to tap into the remote, I opened it up and did a little testing.

The remote is this one: http://www.amazon.com/PSI-Woodworking-Long-Ranger-Remote/dp/B00004S9AL/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1461775316&sr=8-2&keywords=long+ranger+remote

As you can see it uses 2 buttons for "on" and "off" that are normally closed, confirmed with my multimeter.  How can I tap into the buttons to have the arduino recreate the open condition to activate each button?

I did some research and I think I can use a transistor and program it to go into cut off mode when I want one of the buttons activated.  Is this the best method?

Thanks in advance.


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