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Topic: noob question: connectors (Read 3011 times) previous topic - next topic

septillion

Weller fan boy are you :D It might be a bit of an older station but it is an Esra, nothing wrong with that. Tips might not be in mint condition but I would say they're not terrible. I've used worst without a problem when I was to lazy to buy a new one.

You can use flux (as long as you use the right flux, not plumbers flux) but I must say I never use it. I would say enough heat (better a bit to high then to low) and solder with flux is key. Although I must say I never look any further then to look for 60/40 solder with flux. The one on my desk now is HQ 0,7m 60/40 with 2% flux, just the grab and buy solder of my local shop. Works just fine.
Use fricking code tags!!!!
I want x => I would like x, I need help => I would like help, Need fast => Go and pay someone to do the job...

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raschemmel

#16
Apr 27, 2016, 04:29 pm Last Edit: Apr 27, 2016, 04:29 pm by raschemmel
Ok, maybe the soldering iron can stay but everything else should go. I think it's time he bought some new tips. One thing I noticed is he had the temp rather low. This is a common mistake made by beginners who don't know how to judge when a connection is hot enough to solder. Typically they apply the solder and the tip at the SAME time instead of heating the joint up for a few seconds at the right temp and then applying the solder. My guess is his problem is a combination of temp setting too low, not heating joint up long enough and removing iron before solder flows. With my weller , it's always the right temp.

wothke

#17
Apr 27, 2016, 06:44 pm Last Edit: Apr 27, 2016, 06:49 pm by wothke
One thing I noticed is he had the temp rather low. This is a common mistake made by beginners who don't know how to judge when a connection is hot enough to solder. Typically they apply the solder and the tip at the SAME time instead of heating the joint up for a few seconds at the right temp and then applying the solder. My guess is his problem is a combination of temp setting too low, not heating joint up long enough and removing iron before solder flows. With my weller , it's always the right temp.
Thanks for the Weller sales pitch ;-) But I am surprised that you'd consider a temp of close to 400°C (see photo) as "rather low" - but it is true that I am sometimes afraid to heat stuff up for too long (not the pin headers obviously, but for example when soldering a 1.27mm header onto some tiny PCB - like the SI4432 thing on the previous photo - for fear of damaging it.. though I don't see how to heat up a 2.54mm pin "for a few seconds" without having the black plastic run all over the place - but probably that's the difference of having a low powered Weller ;P).

raschemmel

#18
Apr 27, 2016, 07:25 pm Last Edit: Apr 27, 2016, 11:16 pm by raschemmel
The trick to good solder joints is using a hotter tip but holding on the point of contact for a SHORTER period of time , as opposed to using a LOWER temp for a LONGER period of time. Either way, you need the paste to tin the tip and the flux to make the solder flow and stick and the flux remover and brush tro remove the flux. The rest of us have been doing this for about 20 to 30 years. 

larryd

Quote
The trick to good solder joints is using a hotter tip but holding on the point of contact for a SHORTER period of time
Yes!
I agree old man.
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Boardburner2

Yes!
I agree old man.
He is a grandad you know  :)

The connectors and board , how old are they ?
Solder finish ?

larryd

Quote
He is a grandad you know  :)
That doesn't surprise me.
I think he is the oldest guy here.



No technical PMs.
If you are asked a question, please respond with an answer.
If you are asked for more information, please supply it.
If you need clarification, ask for help.

raschemmel

#22
Apr 28, 2016, 01:24 am Last Edit: Apr 28, 2016, 01:30 am by raschemmel
Thanks kids !

Don't make me hurt you...

My grandson takes karate

Chris1448

The trick to good solder joints is using a hotter tip but holding on the point of contact for a SHORTER period of time , as opposed to using a LOWER temp for a LONGER period of time.
That's what I was getting at.
I use a variable 60 watt soldering iron..just a Radio Shack jobby ... And given I live on the Dark side of the moon.. their 60/40 rosen core ..think its 1.8mm solder is my solder of choice..

with the iron at 75% ..can touch and go ..usally about 2-3 seconds to make good joint on these connectors..

Also have my trusty 30watt ..Weller.. for point to point solder..

And for gun shot wounds I have a 100watt..
large ,heavy connections don't stand a chance

For removal of large or reflow ,multi-pin IC's  I-have a micro torch and a toaster oven ..not exactly science or elegant ... but gets the job done ..often this is called "One Shot Technology"..

Boardburner2

Are you pre tinning the wires first ?

This can make things easier.

raschemmel

My only question would be :

"Do you know what a good solder joint should look like ?"

although I am a little curious how long he is holding the iron on with the lower temperature.

Boardburner2


CrossRoads

"Do you know what a good solder joint should look like ?"
which varies between 60/40 lead solder and leadfree solder (where they tend to always look bad it seems).
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

wothke

I am not sure which of the above questions were still directed at me, so I will just summarize:

- I always do tin both ends before I solder them together..

- I do use 60/40 solder (that already contains some kind of flux - judging by the smoke..) and according to https://learn.adafruit.com/adafruit-guide-excellent-soldering/preparation a temperature of 370C should be fine - therefore I don't understand why some people here seem to think that the >390C that I am using are RATHER LOW - I would rather suspect that it is too hot and that I might be burning the flux..

- do I know what a good solder joint should look like? I am certainly no expert but I would go by the descriptions here: https://learn.adafruit.com/adafruit-guide-excellent-soldering/common-problems

- From what has been explained in this thread, I think that the most likely causes for my problems are:
  1) failure to systematically clean all surfaces using isopropyl alcohol
  2) "Disturbed Joints" due to my unsteady hand
  3) maybe a lack of additional flux

Thanks for all your above answers and I'll certainly try to improve on the above points.

Paul__B

failure to systematically clean all surfaces using isopropyl alcohol
Not sure that isopropyl alcohol is particularly appropriate.  Most of the things it would wash away will be volatilised by the soldering temperature.

An abrasive such as steel wool or "Jif" ("Cif") might be more to the point.

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