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Topic: Is there a solution to the soldering nightmare ?  (Read 4630 times) previous topic - next topic

Aethelstan

I was taught to heat the joint and apply the solder to the hot joint from the wire. It's to do with an alloying process and creates a good electrical joint. This creates a decent electrical joint as the solder creates an alloy with the component leads at the surface. The method you described will create poor joints, both electrically and mechanically. There is a hell of a lot more to it than that, but this sticks in my mind as my lecturer at university told us this in February.

tautau123

I was taught to heat the joint and apply the solder to the hot joint from the wire. It's to do with an alloying process and creates a good electrical joint. This creates a decent electrical joint as the solder creates an alloy with the component leads at the surface. The method you described will create poor joints, both electrically and mechanically. There is a hell of a lot more to it than that, but this sticks in my mind as my lecturer at university told us this in February.
When I take an LED and put a drop of hot soldering wire on one of the led legs, he heats up instantaneously. he heats up so fast, that when i soldered 64 leds, I've destroyed 8 from over heating.

So preheating the leg of the LED will definitely kill it.

TomGeorge

Hi,
  • Take the two wires you want to solder together.
  • With clamps or by twisting, connect the wires so they touch where you want the joint.
  • Place the soldering iron tip under the joint, or to the side of the joint, and in contact with the joint.
  • While holding soldering iron in position, count to 5.
  • Then place the end of the solder on the joint, but on the opposite side to the soldering iron, keeping the iron on contact.
  • Let enough solder melt into the joint.
  • Then remove the solder and the iron.

 The keys are;
  • Suitable iron.
  • Suitable sized tip.
  • Suitable sized solder , the smaller the better with resin core.
  • Clean wires/components/PCB surfaces.


We need to see a picture of  your iron and roll of solder.
What is the wattage/power of the iron?
How big is the tip?

Hope it helps.. Tom.. :)
Everything runs on smoke, let the smoke out, it stops running....

Zapro

My procedure is to take a drop of soldering wire with the soldering iron and put it where I need it.
There's your problem.

By "cooking" the solder on the iron before getting it on the joint, you burn off the flux and it cannnot do it's job and soldering becomes almost impossible. No wonder you are having these problems!

Sparkfun soldering guide (not too good, but gets the basics right)

// Per.

tautau123

Thanks zapro and tomgeorge, I'll read your tips.
But still, If I'll preheat things they will get damaged.

Just to clarify
The thing that do the smoke when I touch the solder is some kind of "glue" that should allow the solder wire to connect better ?

Zapro

Thanks zapro and tomgeorge, I'll read your tips.
But still, If I'll preheat things they will get damaged.

Just to clarify
The thing that do the smoke when I touch the solder is some kind of "glue" that should allow the solder wire to connect better ?
If preheating stuff for that 0.5 second destroys the, then your soldering iron is not suitable for the job. Post a picture of ALL your soldering equipment that you are (trying) to use.

The stuff that make the smoke is called FLUX - It chemically cleans the surfaces so the solder can stick. Without flux you will have crappy joints.

// Per.

Wawa

When I take an LED and put a drop of hot soldering wire on one of the led legs, he heats up instantaneously. he heats up so fast, that when i soldered 64 leds, I've destroyed 8 from over heating.

So preheating the leg of the LED will definitely kill it.
Are you sure about that.
Soldering in a non-ESD safe environment can also kill LEDs, especially blue ones.
If you solder with a non-ESD "hot poker", wrap a siece of thin bare copper wire around the two legs (short all legs electrically together).
Just under the LED body.
That could be a single strand from a multi-strand wire.
This technique can also be used for transistors/fets.
Don't forget to remove that wire when you're done.
Always heat up the PART(S) with the iron. NOT the solder.
Push the solder between the part and the tip of the iron.
It should be done in <3seconds.
If not, stop. Let it cool down for ~10seconds, and start over.
I assume you use proper electronics solder. The stuff that smokes (with rosin flux core).
Leo..

tautau123

If preheating stuff for that 0.5 second destroys the, then your soldering iron is not suitable for the job. Post a picture of ALL your soldering equipment that you are (trying) to use.

The stuff that make the smoke is called FLUX - It chemically cleans the surfaces so the solder can stick. Without flux you will have crappy joints.

// Per.
You wrote : "While holding soldering iron in position, count to 5." unless you believe my counting speed is 0.1s per digit I don't see how this suggestion is 0.5 second

Zapro

You wrote : "While holding soldering iron in position, count to 5." unless you believe my counting speed is 0.1s per digit I don't see how this suggestion is 0.5 second
No, i did not.

TomGeorge wrote that.

// Per.

be80be

Nope that's not how you do it you heat the joint with the iron and apply  the solder to the heated joint

raschemmel

Quote
I just have a simple soldering iron with temperature control and a solder wire.

My procedure is to take a drop of soldering wire with the soldering iron and put it where I need it.

Is that specific enough ?
 
No, certainly not.
1-Iron brand and model
2- brand and part number
3- photo of one of your solder joints
4- description of your procedure stated in  a way that allows repeatability:

ie:
1- set iron to [XXX] deg C
2- wait till iron displays temp
3- What ? no solder paste to tin the tip ?
4- What ? no flux applied to the joint ?
5- Apply tip to joint, count "one thousand one, one thousand two etc. (whatever corresponds to your procedure
6-Observe solder flowing ? (no mention of that)
7-remove tip
8-clean joint with flux remover (N/A , since you don't use flux

Conclusion: You simply don't know how to solder because you thought it was too simple to require any in depth research or study. There you have it , the cause of your problem

Solution to your soldering nightmare ? => Learn how to solder by researching the subject and practicing. You've already been given a lot of advice by others here. Follow it.
Arduino UNOs, Pro-Minis, ATMega328, ATtiny85, LCDs, MCP4162, keypads,<br />DS18B20s,74c922,nRF24L01, RS232, SD card, RC fixed wing, quadcopter

Zapro

3- What ? no solder paste to tin the tip ?
Raschemmel; You keep speaking about solder PASTE? What in earth do you need that for? I have solder paste, and it's only used for mounting SMD components that are later baked in an oven.

Extra flux in the means of a flux pen can be nice, but usually not needed for through-hole components.

// Per.

raschemmel

My god,, you never heard of tinning the tip with solder paste ?
Arduino UNOs, Pro-Minis, ATMega328, ATtiny85, LCDs, MCP4162, keypads,<br />DS18B20s,74c922,nRF24L01, RS232, SD card, RC fixed wing, quadcopter

Zapro

My god,, you never heard of tinning the tip with solder paste ?
No. I tin it with standard leaded solder.

I see no reason to use solder paste for that use. It's way more expensive, and melting it on the tip of the iron has no advantage over standard solder.

// Per.

raschemmel

#29
May 16, 2016, 04:35 pm Last Edit: May 16, 2016, 11:07 pm by raschemmel
Quote
No. I tin it with standard leaded solder.

I see no reason to use solder paste for that use. It's way more expensive, and melting it on the tip of the iron has no advantage over standard solder.
Then you are wasting time. The whole point of using it is it can be done with one hand while you are holding the part (board etc) in the other, and it can be done in a second. Time is money where I work so we don't sweat pennies ...
Besides, I am still using the tin of paste I bought 3 years ago so your reason is absurd.

Solder_paste

SOLDER PASTE

If you observe professionals (engineers, technicians, rework people in commercial electronics companies,
you will never see them tinning the tip of the iron with a roll of solder unless they simply don't have any paste at that station. It just doesn't make sense because it requires both hands and is not as fast at sticking the hot tip in the paste and rotating it for a second. Only an amateur would do that. You don't save any money because one tin lasts years.
Arduino UNOs, Pro-Minis, ATMega328, ATtiny85, LCDs, MCP4162, keypads,<br />DS18B20s,74c922,nRF24L01, RS232, SD card, RC fixed wing, quadcopter

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