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Topic: Beginner Electronics (Read 6239 times) previous topic - next topic

raschemmel

The coin envelopes have been tested and work for me.

Paul__B

Perhaps I am unimpressed as I inherited a trove of components, mostly used, from another Amateur, in those coin envelopes.

raschemmel

#32
May 26, 2016, 03:24 pm Last Edit: May 26, 2016, 03:25 pm by raschemmel
I have a small bowl that I use to hold miscillaneous components between projects . I let it get about 1/3 full and then I refile all the components back in their appropriate file (caps in coin envelopes in one tupper tray, diodes in another , transistors in another resistors in large one in the photo. I have already gone through 3 cycles and each time it only takes me about 1/2 hour to 45 minutes to refile everything accumulated in the past month. It never takes more that 5 seconds to find the component I'm looking for. By my standards, that's an acceptable storage-filing system. And of course being able to cross out (or white out) one label and write another is a plus)

larryd

#33
May 26, 2016, 07:49 pm Last Edit: May 26, 2016, 07:51 pm by LarryD
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raschemmel

Ok , that trumps everything I have seen. I can just picture them full of different colored leds, and op amps, and transistors....

CrossRoads

We did the same for a bit - but it got tedious transferring part numbers onto container lids.
Now we just leave the parts in their reels in the ESD bags they came, and have a containers (Really Useful boxes) for SMD
Resistors, SMD Caps, SMD LEDs & diodes, SMD chips, thru hole resistors, thru hole caps, thru hole chips, mechanical parts, terminated wires, IC sockets, Screw shields, Bobuino IIs, Bobweenys. and other similarly grouped parts and kits, etc.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

larryd

#36
May 26, 2016, 11:59 pm Last Edit: May 27, 2016, 12:03 am by LarryD
Quote
I can just picture them full of different



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larryd

#37
May 27, 2016, 12:04 am Last Edit: May 27, 2016, 12:06 am by LarryD
And

No technical PMs.
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polymorph

When I got started in electronics, I scavenged a lot of parts out of TVs and stereos from dumpster diving. I'd have the resistors all tossed into a large flat box.

As a result, I learned to sight-read resistor color codes. A valuable skill that has come in quite handy when troubleshooting, with or without a schematic.
Steve Greenfield AE7HD
Drawing Schematics: tinyurl.com/23mo9pf - tinyurl.com/o97ysyx - https://tinyurl.com/Technote8
Multitasking: forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=223286.0
gammon.com.au/blink - gammon.com.au/serial - gammon.com.au/interrupts

raschemmel

Quote
As a result, I learned to sight-read resistor color codes. A valuable skill that has come in quite handy when troubleshooting, with or without a schematic.
I was unaware there was any other way to do it.
When I see red red red my brain returns 2.2 k automatically etc.
Doesn't everyone (besides Newbies) do that ?

polymorph

I was unaware there was any other way to do it.
When I see red red red my brain returns 2.2 k automatically etc.
Doesn't everyone (besides Newbies) do that ?
That's what I used to think. But since then, I've worked with a lot of techs who can't do that. It really hurts their ability to work.

In school, most students seem resistant (snerk) to learning the color codes this way.
Steve Greenfield AE7HD
Drawing Schematics: tinyurl.com/23mo9pf - tinyurl.com/o97ysyx - https://tinyurl.com/Technote8
Multitasking: forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=223286.0
gammon.com.au/blink - gammon.com.au/serial - gammon.com.au/interrupts

raschemmel

It's not a conscience effort (on my part). I just look at the colors and a number pops in my head.
I can't comprehend how someone can not do that.
It's almost like not knowing how to ride a bicycle or swim.

polymorph

Agreed. Too many people try to recall a mnemonic and work it out laboriously every time.

When I was picking resistors out of the big box o' resistors, I first worked out the colors I was looking for and pictured them in the proper order. When I got better at that, I started repeating the number in my head over and over while picturing the colors.

Now I do as you describe, no conscious effort. I can look at the resistor and tell you the value, or find the resistor in a big bag of mixed resistors. But if you ask me what color goes with what number, I may have to think about it for a moment. I actually do so by picturing a resistor value with that number.

So if you ask what color is 7, I don't remember. I picture a 4.7k resistor and the second color is violet, so 7 is violet.

If someone getting started needs a mnemonic, why use one that is a string of often offensive words that only have the first letter in common?

I tell people Roy G Bv (no indigo). Starting at 2, red orange yellow green blue violet. Zero is nothing, black is nothing. Brown is just above black, so that is 1. Past violet, white is the max so that is 9, grey is just under white so grey is 8. But - I didn't use that to learn (not memorize) color codes.
Steve Greenfield AE7HD
Drawing Schematics: tinyurl.com/23mo9pf - tinyurl.com/o97ysyx - https://tinyurl.com/Technote8
Multitasking: forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=223286.0
gammon.com.au/blink - gammon.com.au/serial - gammon.com.au/interrupts

raschemmel

#43
May 28, 2016, 09:50 pm Last Edit: May 28, 2016, 09:53 pm by raschemmel
black (0)
brown (1)
red     (2)
orange (3)
yellow  (4)
green  (5)
blue    (6)
violet  (7)
grey   ( "8" ) this is what happens without the quotes: (8)
white  (9)

just like 1,2,3, 4,

no effort.
I can recall colors by number too. (can't everyone ?)(0)

gpsmikey

The only one I ever worked with that couldn't just glance at a resistor (capacitors are a different critter with their different color codes) and tell the value had a valid excuse - he was color blind  :o   Still one of the best techs I ever worked with.  I also used to get my parts from old TV chassis that I got down at St. Vincet de Paul for 50 cents.  Still have some of those old power transformers downstairs with the big 6.3v filament windings - some of them even had a socket on top of the power transformer for the rectifier (either the 5U4 or the older 80 )  Back then (before PCB's) many of the components had reasonable leads on them.  My other favorite was Radio Shack for a while had boxes of small logic cards removed from computers with transistors etc. on them.  Pretty funny - one Star Trek episode where Spock was under the console "fixing" the life support system, I recognized a number of those same cards there as their "life support system"  :smiley-confuse:
mikey
-- you can't have too many gadgets or too much disk space !
old engineering saying: 1+1 = 3 for sufficiently large values of 1 or small values of 3

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