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Topic: Why was the due retired? (Read 3598 times) previous topic - next topic

tuskiomi

It was such a good board for those that had project that needed both tons of IO, and fast, plentiful processing power.  I purchased 3 of them myself, and I love them! People may whine about never needing 81MHz for project, or critisize the rediculous number of IO ports, but I can assure you that there are many applications where ample IO and processing power is needed. Is it because for the money, a raspberry pi may be better?

pert

This is the most informative thread I've seen on the subject of the Due: https://groups.google.com/a/arduino.cc/forum/#!topic/developers/HEKecd0qhS4

From Massimo Banzi:
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When we rebuilt our manufacturing network we took the chance to redesign the product line to simplify it.

We also had to decide the sequence of release giving priority to products that are most popular.

Having said this we see an interest for the Due from the resellers and we're working on a solution

In the meantime the SAM core is still supported and it's getting updated even if we're not selling the hardware

tuskiomi

And karma for you. But will they do anything simillar, a 50+MHz board?

68tjs

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we took the chance to redesign the product line to simplify it.
It is that we try to make us believe, it is a political response.
Arduino.cc never wanted to take industrial risks, he must find industrials to make his boards.
It is industrials which take risk.
DUE was not quite sold and there is no industrial which acepted to manufacture it.
Yes zero is only a cortex M0 at 50 mHz  and DUE a  cortex M3  at 90 mHz: this is not the same power.

But DUE is always manufactured by arduino.org in Italy the only place where they have always been manufactured.

BulldogLowell

have a look at the particle photon... familiar arduino-like programming with 120MHz and built in WiFi for $19US.

Plus... way superior online forum support by the Particle team.  They also have rich user support, but higher level, for sure.

westfw

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It is industrials which take risk.
There is plenty of risk involved for both the hardware and software side of a new enterprise.   It's true that manufacturing hardware requires actual cash, but cash is not a particularly significant risk.


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But DUE is always manufactured by arduino.org in Italy the only place where they have always been manufactured.
And arduino.org could have created a lot of good will, and even changed opinions, if they had made a significant effort in improving the software support for platforms that had been "abandoned" by Arduino.cc (Leonardo and Due in particular.)  (We all agree that Due software support is a bit behind, right?)  But no, they only show signs of being a pure hardware company, releasing new complex designs (Tian, Arduino Industrial 101, Otto, and now Primo (triple-core!)) without much proof that they can write the software for such boards.  (The new "contest" for Primo development is especially ... worrisome.)

But .org HAS said that they'll continue to manufacture Dues.  I guess that's something.  They have the design and presumably the manufacturing data and equipment, so presumably it's relatively easy for them to run off a batch or two now and then.  Much easier than for arduino.cc to convince a new manufacturer to make some...  All you would-be Due  users can start making your feature requests on the Arduino.org Due forum, and we'll see what happens...


68tjs

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They have the design and presumably the manufacturing data and equipment, so presumably it's relatively easy for them to run off a batch or two now and then.  Much easier than for arduino.cc to convince a new manufacturer to make some...
This is what I wrote on several occasions.
But if there is no volunteer to make the DUE for Arduino  LLC, it is the proof that there are not enough buyers. The board is failling.
 
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But no, they only show signs of being a pure hardware company, releasing new complex designs (Tian, Arduino Industrial 101, Otto, and now Primo (triple-core!))
You forget that Yun and its  libraries are Musso.
 I am waiting for the new version of the IDE that will take into account the STM32 with great curiosity.


For me it is not the most worrying.  Most disturbing is that only old avr boards are cheap.
All new boards are complex and expensive, between 50 and 100 € for LLC as for SRL
There will not be much demand and this is dangerous for the project when we can find for 3 € on Ebay boards with a STM32 F103 Cortex M3 (such as DUE, Zero is cortex M0) .

The future for Arduino (LLC as SRL) will not be a cakewalk.

Mbed project, which is funded directly by ARM and micro-controlers manufacturers (including Atmel), seems to me more stable.
No matter who makes the board, even in China, there will always be a micro-controller inside .

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