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Topic: Want to make 0-75mV to 4-20mA converter by using of arduino nano controller (Read 978 times) previous topic - next topic

ankur9293

Also require program for the same and other useful information which is useful for project.

larryd

No technical PMs.
If you are asked a question, please respond with an answer.
If you are asked for more information, please supply it.
If you need clarification, ask for help.

DrAzzy

The Arduino does not have facilities for current output, so you must use external components as Larry said. Whether it makes sense to even involve an Arduino depends on project requirements.
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dlloyd

As mentioned by DrAzzy, you'll need to be more specific on your requirements and what the Arduino will be used for.

It is possible to use an op-amp to "convert" the 0-75mV to 0-1.1V and then use an analog input with  Arduino's internal 1.1V reference. Then develop code to do whatever you need. Then use an external DAC as in figure 7 here.

AWOL

Duplicate post deleted.

Do not cross-post, cross-posting wastes time.

Jiggy-Ninja

Also require program for the same and other useful information which is useful for project.
No one's going to do your project for you.

Also, no one would make this kind of circuit with a microcontroller. This is the kind of thing op amps are made for.
Hackaday: https://hackaday.io/MarkRD
Advanced C++ Techniques: https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=493075.0

allanhurst

Analog devices make a range of suitable devices - eg the

AD 5421

I wouldn't dream of doing it any other way

regards

Allan.

dlloyd

Quote
Also, no one would make this kind of circuit with a microcontroller.
Depending on the application, I sure wouldn't hesitate. For straight conversion as a "dumb" converter, using just op-amps are fine. However, for a "smart" device with added functionality, like multiple ranges, recording, logging, changing conditions based on sensor inputs (temp, over-range, etc), multiple outputs (pulse integration, PWM, analog), wireless, digital calibration, fault detection, etc, etc, then an MCU is needed.

Many industrial 4-20mA devices are MCU based, so this is nothing out of the ordinary. Perhaps we'll find out what "this" is from the OP.

Jiggy-Ninja

No "smart" functionality or digital outputs were mentioned, just one fixed analog->analog range. I'll give you fault detection and calibration, but all that stuff (including the smart functionality) is conceptually more "alongside" the conversion circuit rather than "a part" of it.
Hackaday: https://hackaday.io/MarkRD
Advanced C++ Techniques: https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=493075.0

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