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Topic: 5v DC from 220v AC circuit (Read 20180 times) previous topic - next topic

leoncorleone

Hello to all.
My circuit need to 5v DC and about 1Amp current also I want to provide this power from 220v AC.
I want the smallest circuit for power.Any Idea?
tnx.

MarkT

[ I will NOT respond to personal messages, I WILL delete them, use the forum please ]

Power_Broker

If you need the circuit to be tiny and a laptop charger is too big, then here's what you can do:

Feed the AC to a diode full wave rectifier. Then feed that output to a 5.1V Zener diode, a capacitor, and (lastly) a resistor all in parallel.

The output voltage across the resistor will be about 5V DC.

You could solder the circuit onto a small proto board or PCB easy.
"The desire that guides me in all I do is the desire to harness the forces of nature to the service of mankind."
   - Nikola Tesla

leoncorleone

Sorry, do you have any circuit for it?
thanks again.

Power_Broker

Sorry, do you have any circuit for it?
thanks again.
I just described it to you, lol  :D . You just have to make it.

See attached schematic.
"The desire that guides me in all I do is the desire to harness the forces of nature to the service of mankind."
   - Nikola Tesla

stowite

#5
Jul 31, 2016, 09:44 pm Last Edit: Jul 31, 2016, 09:47 pm by stowite
I just described it to you, lol  :D . You just have to make it.

See attached schematic.
You have to be joking!  The rectified 240 V mains will be directly connected across the 5V zener. This will put very high current through the bridge rectifier and the zener and either the zener or the bridge will fail; probably with a loud bang. If the zener fails then the capacitor and resistor will see the rectified mains and something else will give once again probably with a load bang.

This whole circuit is so silly and dangerous that I have to question your sanity and qualifications.

Power_Broker

You have to be joking!  The rectified 240 V mains will be directly connected across the 5V zener. This will put very high current through the bridge rectifier and the zener and either the zener or the bridge will fail; probably with a loud bang. If the zener fails then the capacitor and resistor will see the rectified mains and something else will give once again probably with a load bang.

This whole circuit is so silly and dangerous that I have to question your sanity and qualifications.
Ahhh, yes. It should be isolated with a step down transformer. Forgive me for the mistake, you are right, sir.
"The desire that guides me in all I do is the desire to harness the forces of nature to the service of mankind."
   - Nikola Tesla

Noobian

#7
Aug 01, 2016, 04:10 am Last Edit: Aug 01, 2016, 04:22 am by Noobian
If budget allows then why not use this tiny little AC 220v to DC 5v module? it cost me about 4$ and it easily fits on my PCB and breadboard. :)

module name Hi-Link HLK-5M05




It has a built in transformer and capacitors, in case you're wondering if it's just a cheap 4 rectifier diode inside that tiny box.

be80be


Southpark

If budget allows then why not use this tiny little AC 220v to DC 5v module? it cost me about 4$ and it easily fits on my PCB and breadboard. :)

module name Hi-Link HLK-5M05

I think that module can run at 5V, 0.6 Amp continuously. The OP reckons they need 1 Amp.


CrossRoads

You can take the circuit out of one of these, it's pretty small
Input Voltage100V-240VAC
Frequency50-60Hz
Output Voltage5V
Output Current2A

http://www.dipmicro.com/store/DCA-0510 1A
http://www.dipmicro.com/store/DCA-0520 2A
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

leoncorleone

#11
Aug 01, 2016, 06:51 am Last Edit: Aug 01, 2016, 06:53 am by leoncorleone
Thanks everyone.
I have another question.
What kind of Transformer is used in below converter?
This is a 220v AC to 5v DC converter.

tnx

OldSteve


Ahhh, yes. It should be isolated with a step down transformer. Forgive me for the mistake, you are right, sir.
It will still go BANG. Even if the AC source in your diagram is the secondary of a step-down transformer, you have no current-limiting resistor for the Zener diode, so it will die, then the full rectified voltage will be available at the output, probably murdering anything attached.
And even with a series resistor, this circuit is nowhere near suitable for an output current of 1A.
Please do not PM me for help. I am not a personal consultant.
And others will benefit as well if you post your question publicly on the forums.

OldSteve

Thanks everyone.
I have another question.
What kind of Transformer is used in below converter?
This is a 220v AC to 5v DC converter.

tnx
Judging by the size of the transformer, that would be a switching converter, and the transformer would be a high-frequency step-down transformer.

I agree with CrossRoads, pulling the guts out of a commercial 240VAC to 5VDC 2A switching converter is probably the best way to go.
Please do not PM me for help. I am not a personal consultant.
And others will benefit as well if you post your question publicly on the forums.

Southpark

#14
Aug 01, 2016, 07:08 am Last Edit: Aug 01, 2016, 07:20 am by Southpark
Thanks everyone.
I have another question.
What kind of Transformer is used in below converter?
This is a 220v AC to 5v DC converter.
It's just a 2 coil transformer.

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