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Topic: Distress Beacon for Search and Rescue bot (Read 664 times) previous topic - next topic

kdawg10

Hello all,

I'm trying to build an autonomous search and rescue robot that finds its target via a compact distress beacon that someone would turn on in the event they ever got lost. The plan here is to have the beacon output a radio signal (for long range) that the robot can recognize and then try to get closer to, by using a variety of ultrasonic sensors, limit switches, etc. The problem is that I'm new to this whole arduino/radio communication situation. If anyone could help me get started and give me some pointers on this goal, that would be much appreciated.

Thanks :)

PaulS

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then try to get closer to, by using a variety of ultrasonic sensors
I can not imagine how an ultrasonic sensor (how close is there something in front of me?) is going to be useful to find some specific object/person in some unknown location.

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limit switches, etc.
Another useless piece of equipment. Stopping because you hit something is not how you are going to find a lost hiker.

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The problem is that I'm new to this whole arduino/radio communication situation.
The problem is that you haven't a clue how to find a beacon that is sending a signal. Nothing you have suggested is even close to useful.

The art of getting good answers lies in asking good questions.

kdawg10

The limit switches and ultrasonic sensors are there so that the robot doesn't crash into the environment while it's trying to get closer to the signal. I apologize for confusing you, as I may not have been as clear in my original post. And my plan to get the robot to the beacon involves the robot wanting to pick the path where the signal is strongest, and just going forward from there. Then the sensors will kick in, making sure to take alternative routes to the beacon involving the least collateral damage. Of course, there are situations in which the logic of the algorithm will fail, but this is just a school project and harshness of the environment will be limited.

Any constructive criticism and advice would be useful.

PaulS

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And my plan to get the robot to the beacon involves the robot wanting to pick the path where the signal is strongest,
You realize, I hope that many, many factors affect signal strength. A reflection may be stronger than a direct signal. The reflection may come from a surface that is 180 degrees from the direct signal. You would be heading in the wrong direction, based solely on signal strength.

Airplanes have distress beacons that are activated in the event of a crash. You need to research how those beacons are located. It is not based on signal strength at one receiver.
The art of getting good answers lies in asking good questions.

kdawg10

#4
Oct 16, 2016, 01:10 am Last Edit: Oct 16, 2016, 01:26 am by kdawg10
Wow, that is some very useful information. Now I know where to start looking looking, thank you! Just one thought crosses my mind though; would this require an industrial microcontroller, due to the potential complexity here?

PaulS

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would this require an industrial microcontroller, due to the potential complexity here?
The complexity is not in what the microcontroller is doing. Even if it were, "an industrial microcontroller" is simply one that has extra circuitry to idiot-proof its input and output pins. Unless you are an idiot, I don't think you need an industrial microcontroller. 8)
The art of getting good answers lies in asking good questions.

jremington

#6
Oct 17, 2016, 05:46 pm Last Edit: Oct 17, 2016, 05:47 pm by jremington
The best way to find a lost person is to have that person send GPS coordinates. You can buy personal satellite beacons that do that anywhere in the world, e.g. SPOT.

If in some situation SPOT doesn't work, anything using any other type of radio is also unlikely to work.

INTP

You can probably start off by first figuring out how to blink an led. Building a robot (presumably flying?) is far far far faaaaar down the list of things you should be considering.

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