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Topic: Test equipment (Read 3178 times) previous topic - next topic

tinman13kup

I might have to go grab one of those pumps. Mine is working for now, but it's old and the rubber cups are showing it. One has a hole in it. I had to run up to the local mom-n-pop store up the road (I'm in the country) and they have some surplus/return tools they get at auction and resell. One of the items they had happened to be a vacuum pump for $50. Of course it moved 2.5cfm which could be problematic, but I could use it to clean off my desk too.
  Nahh. I guess I'm going to town tomorrow.

Yes, I can understand what you are saying about designing switch mode converters. I have quite a few different chips, and some of the datasheets seem to leave you hanging in the breeze for utilizing it. The one I'm using is an intersil ISL6341, which seems to have a detailed datasheet with all the equations needed. The pin descriptions seem to be pretty easy to follow as well. I'm not saying it's a 5min job, but it's doable.
Tom
It's not a hobby if you're not having fun doing it. Step back and breathe

raschemmel

#31
Oct 23, 2016, 03:10 am Last Edit: Oct 23, 2016, 03:15 am by raschemmel
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I think he heats his house with old vacuum tubes.
Actually, when I lived in Southern California, I did have an old Tektronix tube scope that I used to heat my room. I sold it for $100 to another DeVry Student in 1995. I bought a Leader 20 Mhz for $95 at Halted Specialties in Sunnyvale, CA.



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Are you saying Raschannel designed the first TTL computer?"
Yes. Here it is...


gpsmikey

In this case, I guess TTL stands for Twisted Tangled Leads  :)
mikey
-- you can't have too many gadgets or too much disk space !
old engineering saying: 1+1 = 3 for sufficiently large values of 1 or small values of 3

tinman13kup

Ahhh, that's why the electron microscope....To see the bottom of that :o


DON'T TOUCH IT!!!! I know where each wire is!
Tom
It's not a hobby if you're not having fun doing it. Step back and breathe

raschemmel

#34
Oct 23, 2016, 03:13 pm Last Edit: Oct 23, 2016, 03:18 pm by raschemmel
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DON'T TOUCH IT!!!! I know where each wire is!
Actually , if you look closely, each wire is labeled. The circuit worked flawlessly on the first test.

(it was really a CMOS circuit)

tinman13kup

Actually , if you look closely, each wire is labeled. The circuit worked flawlessly on the first test.

(it was really a CMOS circuit)
Don't for one second believe that I don't think you know what you are doing.

It did remind me on some of the wire bundles in the racks in the Navy. A million white wires running everywhere (neatly bundled) with a little tag on both ends.
Tom
It's not a hobby if you're not having fun doing it. Step back and breathe

larryd

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A million white wires running everywhere
Navy whites.



.
No technical PMs.
If you are asked a question, please respond with an answer.
If you are asked for more information, please supply it.
If you need clarification, ask for help.

raschemmel

#37
Oct 23, 2016, 04:15 pm Last Edit: Oct 23, 2016, 04:32 pm by raschemmel
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It did remind me on some of the wire bundles in the racks in the Navy. A million white wires running everywhere (neatly bundled) with a little tag on both ends.
It looks scarier than it really is. It's mostly just tedious. That circuit was built in 1982, the year IBM released the IBM PC. and only a few years after Intel released the first microprocessor chips. Obviously it would be done differently today. It was a complex timing controller requiring many different monostable and astable vibrators, (one shots and oscillators) The pots were for setting the time delay of the one shots or the frequency of the oscillators. All of that was done with LM555 chips (a whole BUNCH of them. Don't recall exactly how many but it was too many any way you look at it) The main concern with that particular controller is that it HAD to work PERFECTLY the first time because it was for special event contracted by the Los Angeles Museum of Fine Arts in Paramount Studio's Sound Stage 13 (where the first Star Trek movie was filmed). Leanard Nemoy and William Shatner were guest speakers for the event and the controller had to work. There would be no time to troubleshoot it if it didn't and the Hollywood city regulations required that the equipment pass a functional test for the Fire Marshall at noon on the day of the party (which was in the evening) Failure to pass the test means the owner of all the equipment is immediately evicted from the premises with all their equipment. Thay are given several hours to vacate the premises and then the police are called to drag them out kicking and screaming. So , yeah, no pressure.

Oh, and please don't ask for the Fritzing for that circuit like Larry did.... ;D
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Navy whites.
No . Air Force Hospital Whites. (I was an Air Force Hospital corpsman- ICU, Tachikawa, Japan, 1969 -1971)

ChrisTenone

@LarryD,

You ROCK !

I just got one of these...

Your's is much bigger than mine.


What, I need to say something else too?

raschemmel

I don't trust anyone with a clean desk...

gpsmikey

I don't trust anyone with a clean desk...
Agreed !!  A clean desk is the sign of a sick mind (I'm safe).

mikey
mikey
-- you can't have too many gadgets or too much disk space !
old engineering saying: 1+1 = 3 for sufficiently large values of 1 or small values of 3

tinman13kup

I don't trust anyone with a clean desk...
True, but he gets a little credit for having a cup of coffee next to the gear

As for me, it seems no matter how large my desk is, my actual work area will be diminished to a 12"x12" area, but I still know where everything is!!
Tom
It's not a hobby if you're not having fun doing it. Step back and breathe

raschemmel

#42
Oct 23, 2016, 07:13 pm Last Edit: Oct 23, 2016, 07:16 pm by raschemmel
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As for me, it seems no matter how large my desk is, my actual work area will be diminished to a 12"x12" area, but I still know where everything is!!
If you photograph a cluttered desk, it looks like random access memory, but if you blindfold the desk owner and interrogate him about the location of specific items , their accuracy is usually within 1 or 2 inches of the object in question. using other objects as reference points :
ie: the notebook is underneath the pile of receipts in the right upper quadrant of the desk ...etc"

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True, but he gets a little credit for having a cup of coffee next to the gear 
Ok, but if he is right-handed as appears in the photo, why is the cup closest to his right hand instead of on the left side of the desk so he can pick it up without taking his hand off the mouse ?

tinman13kup

Ok, but if he is right-handed as appears in the photo, why is the cup closest to his right hand instead of on the left side of the desk so he can pick it up without taking his hand off the mouse ?
Maybe he doesn't multitask well. Perhaps he took a bite out of his mouse while simultaneously smearing his doughnut on the desk???

  For me, the coffee goes wherever it fits.
Tom
It's not a hobby if you're not having fun doing it. Step back and breathe

raschemmel

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For me, the coffee goes wherever it fits.
I sip coffee while driving on the freeway so it's natural to do it while surfing the web...

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