Go Down

Topic: Best soldering tip FYI (Read 2877 times) previous topic - next topic

larryd

No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

INTP

I think you just solved a problem I didn't really know I had. I always wondered why I'd clean my tip and immediately have junk on it again.
I gave the brass mesh sponge in a tin a try after the damp sponge method. Brass mesh sponge is indescribably better.

Boardburner2

@DocStein99
If you are considering SMD devices, a hot air rework station may be your answer.

I just get the mother in law to breath on it  :)

larryd

Yes that would work :)

You can get solder to quickly solidify by submitting it to the cold shoulder from the wife.

.
No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

DocStein99

I am NOT considering SMD.  All of those tools will not help me hold, place those tiny components.  I already have a tough enough time reading labels on DIP sized chips.

larryd

No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

larryd

#21
Oct 29, 2016, 09:05 pm Last Edit: Oct 29, 2016, 09:08 pm by LarryD
@DocStein99
Hot Air soldering:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iWjJ-lsUQ30



.
No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

Boardburner2

I am NOT considering SMD.  All of those tools will not help me hold, place those tiny components.  I already have a tough enough time reading labels on DIP sized chips.
I find a cheap USB microscope useful for this.
Placing smd components i find increasingly difficult (shakes).

I wonder how the upcoming generation and new students handle this with fewer components being available in thriough hole packages.

larryd

#23
Oct 29, 2016, 10:02 pm Last Edit: Oct 30, 2016, 01:07 am by LarryD
Here is a good idea to get one stable hand ;)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_iOKOnbmJXA



Edit:
In the version I made, I added a third, middle alligator clip at the center of the rod therefore there are 3 of them.
.
No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

Boardburner2

#24
Oct 30, 2016, 12:53 am Last Edit: Oct 30, 2016, 01:00 am by Boardburner2
i use something like this.

https://www.machinemart.co.uk/p/clarke-3-inch-vice-cdv30c/?da=1&TC=GS-040314019&gclid=COWAhveMgdACFdTNGwodrDEEsg

That has parallel jaws though, mine has a 2mm lip for sheet metal which is ideal for solderig PCBs.

Very solid  so only twitch is the soldering iron.

Better pic, but mine is better. 2 quid from a boot sale

https://www.wonkeedonkeetools.co.uk/media/wysiwyg/27V-Vices-Meg/27V69/V-69-2_TBI_Drill_press_vice_.jpg


DocStein99

I use a rotisserie jig to hold circuit boards, is nice.  Has a spring to move in and out to hold the board, flips around, and holds position.  I would show a picture of it here, except the forum won't allow me to insert pictures (with ease).  I bought it at a flea market for like $5.00 and had no idea what it was until I looked it up when I got home.  It's old and indestructible.  They are rare, I've never seen one for sale on any modern electric tool supply.

ilguargua

I have the panavise at work, with this pcb holder :



and is indeed useful for pcb repair/rework. For assembly I have this one from Weller :



nice to own, but I have not used it so much.
Both are not so cheap, but not very expensive.


Ciao, Ale.

larryd

#28
Oct 30, 2016, 04:28 pm Last Edit: Oct 30, 2016, 05:25 pm by LarryD
I have seen these around but have not used them:
omni vice.






.
No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

DocStein99

Yes, mine looks like the "panavise" on Larryd's post at the top.  I havent seen any of the other tools, they are interesting.

Go Up