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Topic: Share tips you have come across (Read 145757 times) previous topic - next topic

larryd

Yes, some SMD resistors can be attracted to a magnet.


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larryd

#286
Mar 05, 2017, 01:26 am Last Edit: Mar 08, 2017, 04:01 am by LarryD
It can be frustrating to use Arduino Pro Minis and Bobweeny type boards with a breadboard because these cards take up a lot of real-estate.
Add two 1.75" standoffs to a breadboard thereby raising the controllers to a second story.
This way you do not lose any breadboard column connections.
The standalone controller card is mounted on a 'proto board' as seen in the images.
The header pins are a 1:1 relation to the controller card pins.
I flared the header pins out at the top so the controller PCB does not interfere with the jumper pins.

Using DuPont male to male wires, you jumper the upstairs headers to the breadboard below.









The pièce de résistance comes when we get Crossroad's new Mega breadboard friendly board Megaweeny.






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larryd

#287
Mar 05, 2017, 01:27 am Last Edit: Mar 05, 2017, 01:30 am by LarryD





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CrossRoads

Assembled MegaDip pics in a few days.  I didn't have voltage regulators or diodes in the packages needed; parts have been ordered.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

larryd

With your new Mega card, we will not need the proto card carrier.
The standoffs will attach directly to your card, then solder on headers.


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larryd

#290
Mar 05, 2017, 06:57 pm Last Edit: Mar 05, 2017, 09:18 pm by LarryD
It can be frustrating to find the correct sized insulated washer when you need to add a metal screw to a PCB.
The plastic in an old gift card is great for making the size of washer you require.
First make sure you cash the card in.   ;)
Align one card perfectly with the other card.
Clamp the two cards together with a bulldog clip.
Drill two registration corner holes.
Make sure these holes are a tight fit with registration screws, example for a 2-56 screw, use drill bit #43, in fact I would go as low as #45.
Screw the two cards together, drill random 1/2 mm holes through both cards.
Space these holes at reasonable spacing for making the outside diameter of the washer.
Separate the two cards.
Note: Each punch has a center brad point.  Use this point to center the punch on the 1/2 mm holes made above.
On one card, at each 1/2 mm hole, punch holes for the inside diameter required.
On the second card, at each 1/2 mm hole, punch holes for the outside diameter required.
Place the two cards together again with the two registration screws.
Using the same punch that you used for the outside diameter holes, punch the inside diameter card.









Edit:
If you lean towards the obsessive, tape a piece of paper with a 2D array of dots on the card before you drill the 1/2 mm holes.
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larryd

#291
Mar 05, 2017, 07:01 pm Last Edit: Mar 05, 2017, 07:01 pm by LarryD
Put some thought into your work area surfaces.
This is what I am using.




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Watcher

#292
Mar 06, 2017, 01:56 pm Last Edit: Mar 06, 2017, 01:59 pm by Watcher
If anyone is interested in an arduino controlled electronic load, I recently made this one.



The total cost doesn't exceed 80 Euros including the box and it works real well. By changing a few components in the original design you can even upgrade the specs. Mine now can handle  upto 75V as opposed to the original 24V. I have also added additional software features such as complete remote control from the serial port, thermal shutdown etc.

NB: Photo above is from the original article and comments that follow.


TomGeorge

#293
Mar 06, 2017, 02:11 pm Last Edit: Mar 06, 2017, 02:12 pm by TomGeorge
Hi,

If anyone is interested in an arduino controlled electronic load, I recently made this one.

The total cost doesn't exceed 80 Euros including the box and it works real well. By changing a few components in the original design you can even upgrade the specs. Mine now can handle  upto 75V as opposed to the original 24V. I have also added additional software features such as complete remote control from the serial port, thermal shutdown etc.

WOW an Destructible project that actually works and is presented in a full and comprehensive manner.
Congrats.. Looks good with diagrams and pictures.

Tom... :)
Everything runs on smoke, let the smoke out, it stops running....

Watcher

#294
Mar 06, 2017, 02:17 pm Last Edit: Mar 06, 2017, 02:17 pm by Watcher
Quote
WOW an Destructible project ...
Guess you mean constructable... :)

larryd

I have wanted to make a load like that but have never got around to it.  :(

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larryd

#296
Mar 06, 2017, 04:28 pm Last Edit: Mar 06, 2017, 05:45 pm by LarryD
I often use a proto board as a template for drilling equally spaced holes.
Conveniently, the proto board has holes drilled at .1-inch spacing.
Use a bulldog clip to clamp the proto board to your work.
On the back of the proto board, mark the location where each required hole is to be drilled.
Drill a 1 or 2 mm pilot hole at each location.
Remove the drilling template (proto board).
Enlarge the pilot holes to their final size.



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larryd

#297
Mar 07, 2017, 08:53 pm Last Edit: Mar 10, 2017, 04:41 pm by LarryD
Sometimes it is difficult to marry up a motor to hardware.

Standoffs can be a good way to attach a motor shaft to a threaded rod.

Standoffs come in 2-56, 4-40, 6-32, 8-32, 3 - 4 mm and others.

The following shows one way to accomplish the above.







Edit:
See post 307 also.
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larryd

#298
Mar 07, 2017, 08:57 pm Last Edit: Mar 07, 2017, 09:01 pm by LarryD
You can of course add extra items to detect when the traveler reaches limits.






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westfw

Quote
work area surfaces.
As shown, don't you wind up with static-prone (silicone, teflon) plastics next to your actual chips?
(I guess silicone and teflon are right next to each other in the triboelectric series, but...  All those different materials make me really nervous!)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triboelectric_effect

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