Go Down

Topic: Share tips you have come across (Read 133614 times) previous topic - next topic

larryd

#600
Aug 04, 2018, 04:26 am Last Edit: Aug 04, 2018, 05:03 am by larryd






To make the images more viewable, I did not show a stop plate.
You should use a stop plate to protect your bottom surface.


 
No technical PMs.
If you are asked a question, please respond with an answer.
If you are asked for more information, please supply it.
If you need clarification, ask for help.

larryd

#601
Aug 04, 2018, 04:26 am Last Edit: Aug 04, 2018, 09:17 pm by larryd


I like to use a standoff that is a bit longer than the material is thick.


Video speed has been sped up.




No technical PMs.
If you are asked a question, please respond with an answer.
If you are asked for more information, please supply it.
If you need clarification, ask for help.

Henry_Best

DCM?
I guess it's a solvent for welding plastic.

larryd

#603
Aug 04, 2018, 05:52 am Last Edit: Aug 04, 2018, 07:29 am by larryd
DCM, or 'Methylene Chloride', or Dichloromethane (takes 15 seconds to weld acrylic).

If ABS plastic is used Acetone works.

MEK works but smells bbbaadd.

You could use 5 minute Epoxy glue.

You can try PVC and ABS glues from the hardware store.

Or double sided foam tape if the plastic nut is sufficiently large.




No technical PMs.
If you are asked a question, please respond with an answer.
If you are asked for more information, please supply it.
If you need clarification, ask for help.

Henry_Best

DCM, or 'Methylene Chloride', or Dichloromethane (takes 15 seconds to weld acrylic).

If ABS plastic is used Acetone works.

MEK works but smells bbbaadd.

You could use 5 minute Epoxy glue.

You can try PVC and ABS glues from the hardware store.

Or double sided foam tape if the plastic nut is sufficiently large.
Methylene Dichloride is sold here, in the UK, under the trade name "Plastic Weld".
I keep mine in the fridge, to stop it evaporating.
MEK = Methyl Ethyl ne. I don't mind the smell. It's not as bad as Acetone.
Some of the higher nes have quite pleasant smells, one has a distinctive 'pear drops' smell.

larryd

#605
Aug 04, 2018, 07:53 pm Last Edit: Aug 23, 2018, 05:57 pm by larryd
Methylene Dichloride is sold here, in the UK, under the trade name "Plastic Weld".
I keep mine in the fridge, to stop it evaporating.
MEK = Methyl Ethyl ne. I don't mind the smell. It's not as bad as Acetone.
Some of the higher nes have quite pleasant smells, one has a distinctive 'pear drops' smell.
What bottles do you use to store your DCM?

Would you show an image of the inside of the cap.

What do you tell your spouse when you put the solvent in the fridge?  ;)

I think Weld-On 4 is DCM in the USA.

DCM in Canada can be bought under the name 'Fast Bond'.

I do a lot of plastic construction with DCM.

Hobbyists often use this applicator to weld with DCM.
https://www.modelscenerysupplies.co.uk/scratch-build/paints-adhesive-glues/Adhesives/Flex-i-file-Touch-n-flow-system-7000   





Edit:
Another supplier in Canada, "Canadian Express Line"
http://www.canadianexpressline.com/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1_2&products_id=12016   
~$6.00 for 100ml




No technical PMs.
If you are asked a question, please respond with an answer.
If you are asked for more information, please supply it.
If you need clarification, ask for help.

westfw

"Testor's Liquid Plastic Cement" - still available in most hobby stores.

Henry_Best

#607
Aug 05, 2018, 05:37 pm Last Edit: Aug 05, 2018, 05:42 pm by Henry_Best
What bottles do you use to store your DCM?

Would you show an image of the inside of the cap.

What do you tell your spouse when you put the solvent in the fridge?  ;)

I think Weld-On 4 is DCM in the USA.
I store it, upright, in the bottle it came in. 57ml (2 imperial fl oz) in a brown glass bottle with a 'childproof' cap, the type used on medicine bottles. I bought it from a model shop.
I've seen 500ml cans of it, but I don't know where to buy them and don't use it often enough to justify buying that much.
As it has minimal smell and doesn't evaporate in the fridge*, my wife hasn't complained about it in the year or so it's been there.  :)
* I suspect that there is a slight negative pressure in the bottle when it's at 5oC.
If it was causing a nuisance, I could try putting it in the freezer, but don't know if the bottle would withstand freezing.


I usually apply it with a modelling paintbrush, the type with only a few hairs. Only a very small amount is needed, as it has low surface tension and capillary action flows it along the join.

larryd

#608
Aug 05, 2018, 07:23 pm Last Edit: Aug 05, 2018, 07:26 pm by larryd
Do the caps on the bottle have a polyproplyene or aluminum tape seal?

DCM freezes at -97°C so the freezer should work.



No technical PMs.
If you are asked a question, please respond with an answer.
If you are asked for more information, please supply it.
If you need clarification, ask for help.

Henry_Best

Do the caps on the bottle have a polyproplyene or aluminum tape seal?
Inside the cap is an aluminium foil disk on a slightly compressible substrate. It appears to give a perfect seal against the glass bottle.

Henry_Best

DCM freezes at -97°C so the freezer should work.
My freezer only gets down to about -20oC, so no chance of it going solid. 

allanhurst

DCM is the basis of many commercial paint strippers, so be careful!

Allan

larryd

#612
Aug 06, 2018, 04:56 pm Last Edit: Aug 06, 2018, 04:58 pm by larryd
DCM is the basis of many commercial paint strippers, so be careful!

Allan
Agreed.
However, using DCM in these kind of applications, we are talking about 4 drops at a time.
I do highly recommend a bit of protection ;)

https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=445951.msg3475231#msg3475231   









No technical PMs.
If you are asked a question, please respond with an answer.
If you are asked for more information, please supply it.
If you need clarification, ask for help.

larryd

#613
Aug 07, 2018, 12:06 am Last Edit: Aug 07, 2018, 12:43 am by larryd
3D work platform.

Make an adjustable work surface for your work bench.
Aim the platform by adjusting pitch and yaw.
Two C clamps hold the tool's base to a bench pin or use the 4 holes in the swivel base to attach to a wooden board.

Attach cameras, sensors or other equipment.
Also great as a soldering platform with adjustable positions.
Use it for holding a powered PCB while measurements are taken.
The board can be turned to a desired position to get to test points.

You need:
- 4" X 1 3/8" Locking swivel caster wheel. ~$20.00.  Source Or Home Depot
- Two aluminum 1" X 1" angle brackets.
- Four M2 nuts, screws. standoffs and washers.
- Four #6 self-tapping screws.
- 1/8" aluminum 'first story' with corner holes to attach other surfaces.
- FR4 PCB 'second story' surface to allow clamping

The wheel lock, locks the 'pitch' axis.
A bottom front screw locks the 'yaw' axis. Screw pushes a pressure plate against the swivel base bearing bell, locking it.
Leaving the two locking controls a bit loose, allows for tuning, or you can lock the controls completely.

Two angle brackets are spaced so the wheel can fit in between.
Four self-tapping screws attach the brackets to the wheel's sides.









No technical PMs.
If you are asked a question, please respond with an answer.
If you are asked for more information, please supply it.
If you need clarification, ask for help.

larryd

#614
Aug 07, 2018, 12:06 am Last Edit: Aug 07, 2018, 12:10 am by larryd








No technical PMs.
If you are asked a question, please respond with an answer.
If you are asked for more information, please supply it.
If you need clarification, ask for help.

Go Up