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Topic: Share tips you have come across (Read 134665 times) previous topic - next topic

larryd

#690
Oct 20, 2019, 10:29 pm Last Edit: Oct 21, 2019, 07:56 am by larryd
If you use an oval hole, you will have to form the cable end into shape with pliers.
Make sure you get a good fit and the cable does not turn in the oval hole.
You still need a cable tie to prevent the cable from pulling out of the chassis.

The oval method does not need a standoff, however, the strain relief it offers is not very good.








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larryd

#691
Oct 21, 2019, 04:02 am Last Edit: Oct 21, 2019, 04:16 am by larryd
The brass standoff is probably the easiest method, it provides a strong hitching post for your cable.

If you like working with plastics and have access to Methylene Chloride, you can forgo the standoff and just use plastic.



Since you are welding the plastic to your chassis, there is no visible screw on the outside of the case.



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larryd

#692
Nov 15, 2019, 10:49 pm Last Edit: Nov 15, 2019, 11:40 pm by larryd
While doing some lapidary work, it became obvious the bits I was using could be repurposed into the electronics area.

Wet/dry 'Diamond Core Bits' are used in making jewelry and in cutting holes in glass; for example making a hole in a bottle for a power cord to go through. These bits come in many diameters are relatively inexpensive.

Core bits are hollow and nicely make solder pad shapes in PCB FR4 material.

The following discussion shows how these bits can be used to manufacture a point to point wiring circuit board.  The process is easy and produces a very nice finished product.

Equipment:
1. Diamond core bits, I use mostly .110" and .070" inside diameter.
2. Foredom/Dremel drill press.
3. Other tools and parts as see in the following images.

A drill press is highly recommended for this process as you have full control over positioning and drill depth.

Since a core bit has diamonds in its surface, the bit last a very long time.

Using a .070" core bit, you can easily place pads at .1" centers (you may have to wear a head/eye magnifier).

Not shown in the images is the pad interconnections using 30AWG Kynar wire wrap wire.










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larryd

#693
Nov 15, 2019, 10:49 pm Last Edit: Nov 15, 2019, 11:45 pm by larryd















 
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larryd

#694
Nov 15, 2019, 10:49 pm Last Edit: Nov 15, 2019, 11:01 pm by larryd












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larryd

#695
Nov 15, 2019, 10:50 pm Last Edit: Nov 16, 2019, 07:16 am by larryd
















I have not done this yet, you could chuck the bit in the cutting head of a CNC machine and have it do all your pad placements!

Now on my 'Things To Do' list.





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