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Topic: Share tips you have come across (Read 190176 times) previous topic - next topic

larryd

#825
Jan 03, 2021, 11:21 pm Last Edit: Jan 04, 2021, 03:13 am by larryd
Hi Terry

See post #684-686


https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=445951.msg4324042#msg4324042      




Heat shrink adjusts to the 'nut' diameter. :)

Maybe include a nail, some heat shrink and a link to 684; teaches people to be inventive.

You need to catch up ;).



Also might be interested in post 777.

https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=445951.msg4689031#msg4689031      







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ballscrewbob

#826
Jan 04, 2021, 02:40 am Last Edit: Jan 04, 2021, 02:40 am by ballscrewbob
It may not be the answer you were looking for but its the one I am giving based on either experience, educated guess, google (who would have thunk it ! ) or the fact that you gave nothing to go with in the first place so I used my wonky crystal ball.

terryking228

Hey Larry. That was a fast solution!  And very Elegant. As my friend Peng would say...  很好看


I will try to get the supplier to package the nuts that way.  They have done a nice job, basically, with 12 small labelled ziplock bags for the fasteners.  

Suggestion: Edit the original post to add the phrase "Nut Starter" somewhere. So I can find it with a search next time.

Quote
You need to catch up ;).
I've been trying to catch up.  Almost forever.  I remember well running to catch up to my parents in the evening in August 1945, in my short pants with my American Flag.  






Regards, Terry King terry@yourduino.com  - Check great prices, devices and Arduino-related boards at http://YourDuino.com
HOW-TO: http://ArduinoInfo.Info

larryd

#828
Jan 04, 2021, 03:03 am Last Edit: Jan 04, 2021, 03:34 am by larryd
" Suggestion: Edit the original post to add the phrase "Nut Starter" somewhere. So I can find it with a search next time. "

Done :).



Actually, it should be easy to make those nut starters using 4:1 glue lined heat shrink tubing.

i.e. 4mm on one side and 5.5mm on the other.



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larryd

#829
Jan 04, 2021, 06:43 am Last Edit: Jan 06, 2021, 07:03 am by larryd
Nut starter for Terry :)

Use 4:1 glue lined heat shrink to make nut starters.

You can make these to accommodate 1 or 2 nuts as seen in the images below.

Make a nut starter tool sized M3, M2, 2-56, etc. ahead of time so they are ready to use when they are needed.








Edit.

Just tried 2:1 regular heat shrink (no glue).

This works quite well; you need a 3/16" pre-shrunk diameter to get a final rigid tool for M2 nuts.

M2 not 2M  :smiley-confuse:


BTW, when finished using the driver, leave nuts in the tool, prevents the end from flattening.





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westfw


I remember the Heathkit tools...
Quote
I have supplied small pieces of plastic straw from the supermarket that worked OK on small 6-32 hex nuts.  But they are just wrong for 2mm hex (4mm across flats) or 3mm hex (5.5mm across flats).
Straws are available in a really wide variety of sizes, from "coffee stirrers" with ID ~1/16 inch up to "boba" straws ~1/2 inch.  Unfortunately, exact diameters aren't usually listed in the product information on Amazon :-(



Quote
Can you suggest anything I might be able to put in these kits??  I hate to suggest to a young kid that they use a small lump of Toilet Ring Wax.  Although that DOES work
Silly Putty?  Blue-tack?  (Silly putty does tend to "sag")

larryd

#831
Jan 09, 2021, 09:53 pm Last Edit: Jan 11, 2021, 03:55 am by larryd
Soldering a bent pin header to the top of a PCB is frustrating at the best of times.

The header does not usually sit flush.

The parallel jaws of cross-locking tweezers help make these soldering jobs quick and easy.

As seen in the image below, depending on the size of your PCB, either straight or curved tweezers can be used as a soldering aid.

You will get great 'flush header' results which is what we always look for.

If the header is quite long, use two tweezers.












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larryd

#832
Jan 17, 2021, 10:47 pm Last Edit: Jan 17, 2021, 10:47 pm by larryd
A wire splice is a reasonable solution to connect a large gauge wire to DuPont pin connectors.

If you need a higher current connection, use two DuPont pins.

The reverse is also true; a 30 AWG sensor wire can be spliced to a more reasonable 22/24 AWG wire.






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larryd

#833
Jan 21, 2021, 06:32 am Last Edit: Jan 22, 2021, 06:59 am by larryd
Further to post #659.

Use a syringe to make a tool for cutting equal length pieces of heat shrink or wire.

You can usually get syringes in 1, 1.5, 3, 5, 10 and 20 ml sizes.

A 1.5 ml syringe can be used for different sized heat shrink from 1/16" to 3/16" in diameter.

A 3 ml syringe is good for 1/4" to 5/8".

I use the 1.5 and 3 ml sizes for 90% of projects.

Cut off the hub end of your syringe with a razor saw or utility knife; a flame will get rid of burrs.

Move the plunger to the cut off end.

The barrel flange makes a nice flat surface to rest your nippy cutters on.


















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larryd

#834
Jan 22, 2021, 05:49 am Last Edit: Jan 22, 2021, 08:29 am by larryd
Further to post #730.

Replacing a potentiometer with two SMD resistors has been covered earlier in this thread.

Now we are using machine pin headers to raise the SMD resistors above the board rather than mounting them on Kapton tape.

Use 3 header pins with the top pins cut off flush to the surface.

Solder the 3 pins at the old potentiometer location.

As before, after measuring the potentiometer setting, select 'actual' standard SMD resistors and confirm they will
work in place of the pot.

Since the SMD resistors are ceramic, it would be best to add UV or hot glue over these to prevent breakage.











Old version:



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larryd

#835
Jan 25, 2021, 07:57 pm Last Edit: Jan 25, 2021, 07:59 pm by larryd
There are times when you need a firmer grip on life.

Add a binder clip on the end of a clamp arm gives you a stronger pinch.

An M2 threaded end on the arm allows you to change to a different size clip.

A locking knurled nut holds the clip at the orientation needed.














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Henry_Best

There are times when you need a firmer grip on life.

Add a binder clip on the end of a clamp arm gives you a stronger pinch.
They are known as bulldog clips in the UK.

larryd

#837
Jan 25, 2021, 08:42 pm Last Edit: Jan 25, 2021, 08:47 pm by larryd
 :o  I am in love ;)  . . .










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westfw

Tell me more about "silver soldering" stainless steel...
I have some stainless I'd like to solder, and it's being a real pain.

MAS3

Have a look at "blink without delay".
Did you connect the grounds ?
Je kunt hier ook in het Nederlands terecht: http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/board,77.0.html

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