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Topic: Share tips you have come across (Read 136287 times) previous topic - next topic

larryd

#615
Aug 07, 2018, 12:07 am Last Edit: Aug 07, 2018, 12:11 am by larryd







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larryd

#616
Aug 13, 2018, 10:58 pm Last Edit: Aug 13, 2018, 11:11 pm by larryd
You can effectively use your drill press to cut straight strips of material.
A carbide CNC routing bit, a jointed routing fence and a sled to hold the work is all that's necessary.
The 'work' is stuck to the sled with double stick tape.
The overhang minus the diameter of the bit will be the final width of your strips.

Let's say you want a 1 inch strip of material.
If the cutting bit is 1/8" you must have an overhang of 1.125"

This method is faster and gives a neater edge than using a saw.

Always use eye protection and wear a dust mask when cutting materials.








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larryd

#617
Aug 13, 2018, 10:59 pm Last Edit: Aug 13, 2018, 11:09 pm by larryd
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larryd

#618
Aug 17, 2018, 07:24 pm Last Edit: Aug 18, 2018, 04:43 pm by larryd
Every workshop should have a have a pair of digital calipers.
They are very inexpensive nowadays ~$25.00.

https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B00KDMZQEK/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Even the cheap ones are good as they give repeatable results.
My old vernier calipers were thrown away years back.
If, however, you need to send measurements to others, consider using a micrometer.
You might want to carry a pair in a holster like they did in the 60s with slide rules  ;) .

If you haven't used a pair of calipers, these images might be of interest.







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larryd

#619
Aug 17, 2018, 07:25 pm Last Edit: Aug 17, 2018, 07:29 pm by larryd







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larryd

#620
Aug 17, 2018, 07:25 pm Last Edit: Aug 17, 2018, 07:30 pm by larryd







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allanhurst

Yes, modern digital calipers are excellent - but don't buy a dirt cheapo one , which, in my experience are poorly made and inaccurate - jaws not parallel, outer and inner jaws not aligned correctly etc ...

Allan

larryd

#622
Aug 18, 2018, 01:03 am Last Edit: Aug 18, 2018, 06:33 am by larryd
A suggestion to create a busbar.
See discussion here:
https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=563703.0  

A long male header pin can change the gender of the Dupont connector.

If +5v and GND are both needed, use red and black wires.
Red would go the even number pins.
Black would go to odd number pins.
A two pin header would then be the supply connector.




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larryd

#623
Aug 18, 2018, 03:39 pm Last Edit: Aug 19, 2018, 04:12 am by larryd
I have one bad eye and one that's not great :( .
Add a 6" X 13" X 1/8" Plexiglas safety shield to your workbench.
Two magnets hold the shield to a 403 stainless steel sheet under a silicone mat.
With the shield being 6" wide, your hands can easily get around to hold tools, etc.
Wearing a 1.5X and 2X head magnifier might be a good thing also.
And CrossRoards says wear a dust mask.

BTW, removing the drill press head, gives the full column length to adjust the height of the table work surface.

Foredom P-DP30 Drill Press:
https://www.foredom.net/pdp30drillpress.aspx










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larryd

#624
Aug 18, 2018, 03:39 pm Last Edit: Aug 18, 2018, 03:42 pm by larryd










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larryd

#625
Aug 24, 2018, 07:03 pm Last Edit: Aug 25, 2018, 07:51 am by larryd
Surgeons use snaring tools to capture and cut tissue from the body.
Taking a cue from this, make a snaring tool to hold screws while inserting or removing them.
The second image shows how to hold the tool. Separating the bead from the ball tightens the snare.
The split ring at the end of the snare prevents the snare wire from going in the tube.
The tube is filled with a 'silicone rubber wire' to add friction, so the pull wire is taut.

My older version used a spring to keep the pull wire taut.
It does have the advantage of not needing the split ring.

Tiger tail wire:
https://www.firemountaingems.com/shop/tigertail










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larryd

#626
Aug 24, 2018, 07:03 pm Last Edit: Aug 24, 2018, 07:24 pm by larryd


Takes ~10 minutes to make one of these.




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larryd

#627
Aug 24, 2018, 07:03 pm Last Edit: Aug 24, 2018, 08:23 pm by larryd










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allanhurst

For inserting steel bolts a magnetised screwdriver or little magnet is handy.

For non ferrous a little blob of stiff grease...


Allan

larryd

#629
Aug 24, 2018, 07:22 pm Last Edit: Aug 24, 2018, 07:26 pm by larryd
For inserting steel bolts a magnetised screwdriver or little magnet is handy.

For non ferrous a little blob of stiff grease...


Allan
Magnet  :o  :smiley-draw:

Yes.

It's those damn little M1, M2 and 2-56 screws that are a pain for me.
Arthr in hands doesn't help. :(

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