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Topic: Share tips you have come across (Read 136784 times) previous topic - next topic

larryd

#690
Oct 20, 2019, 10:29 pm Last Edit: Oct 21, 2019, 07:56 am by larryd
If you use an oval hole, you will have to form the cable end into shape with pliers.
Make sure you get a good fit and the cable does not turn in the oval hole.
You still need a cable tie to prevent the cable from pulling out of the chassis.

The oval method does not need a standoff, however, the strain relief it offers is not very good.








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larryd

#691
Oct 21, 2019, 04:02 am Last Edit: Oct 21, 2019, 04:16 am by larryd
The brass standoff is probably the easiest method, it provides a strong hitching post for your cable.

If you like working with plastics and have access to Methylene Chloride, you can forgo the standoff and just use plastic.



Since you are welding the plastic to your chassis, there is no visible screw on the outside of the case.



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larryd

#692
Nov 15, 2019, 10:49 pm Last Edit: Nov 21, 2019, 06:12 pm by larryd
While doing some lapidary work, it became obvious the bits I was using could be repurposed into the electronics area.

Wet/dry 'Diamond Core Bits' are used in making jewelry and in cutting holes in glass; for example making a hole in a bottle for a power cord to go through. These bits come in many diameters and are relatively inexpensive.

Core bits are hollow and nicely make solder pad shapes in PCB FR4 material.

The following discussion shows how these bits can be used to manufacture a point to point wiring circuit board.  The process is easy and produces a very nice finished product.

Equipment:
1. Diamond core bits, I use mostly .110" and .070" inside diameter.
2. Foredom/Dremel drill press.
3. Other tools and parts as see in the following images.

A drill press is highly recommended for this process as you have full control over positioning and drill depth.

Since a core bit has diamonds in its surface, the bit last a very long time.

Using a .070" core bit, you can easily place pads at .1" centers (you may have to wear a head/eye magnifier).

Not shown in the images is the pad interconnections using 30AWG Kynar wire wrap wire.










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larryd

#693
Nov 15, 2019, 10:49 pm Last Edit: Nov 15, 2019, 11:45 pm by larryd















 
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larryd

#694
Nov 15, 2019, 10:49 pm Last Edit: Nov 15, 2019, 11:01 pm by larryd












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larryd

#695
Nov 15, 2019, 10:50 pm Last Edit: Dec 04, 2019, 01:44 am by larryd
















I have not done this yet, you could chuck the bit in the cutting head of a CNC machine and have it do all your pad placements!

Now on my 'Things To Do' list.


Edit see also post #697.


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dougp

Not a tip per se.  Found this via AVR Freaks.  Lots of specialty tools, mostly for working with wire/cable.

Jonard
Everything we call real is made of things that cannot be regarded as real.  If quantum mechanics hasn't profoundly shocked you, you haven't understood it yet. - Niels Bohr

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larryd

#697
Dec 04, 2019, 01:39 am Last Edit: Dec 04, 2019, 01:43 am by larryd
Referring back to post #692?

Example of using the diamond core bur method.












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larryd

#698
Dec 04, 2019, 02:29 am Last Edit: Dec 04, 2019, 02:33 am by larryd
If you have experience at assembling and gluing plastic structures, you can make your own cases/boxes for your Arduino projects.

Below describes a method that produces a reasonable product.













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larryd

#699
Dec 04, 2019, 02:29 am Last Edit: Dec 10, 2019, 06:03 am by larryd













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JohnRob

@larryd   I love your post #692.  Brilliant!  And when I saw your photo of the capacitor going to the ground plane I thought this would be a great EMI barrier for projects in an noisy environment.  One could drill a hole in the center of the isolated pad, bring a wire through and bypass it with a cap. 
Please do not PM me with thread based messages.  If your thoughts are worth responding,  the group should benefit from your insight.

larryd

#701
Dec 10, 2019, 06:02 am Last Edit: Dec 10, 2019, 05:10 pm by larryd

I am not a super fan of using 'hollow desoldering needles', but they have their place.

You do have to be careful not to damage the plated through hole when using these.

A set of needles can be found on eBay at reasonable prices.



However, I find an assortment of stainless steel 'Blunt Dispensing Needles" are reasonably priced, come in a variety of diameters, are easy to manipulate and they do a good job.



Of course, the solder wick 'with' solder flux technique is also useful but your pads can be lifted if you are not careful.



An SC-7000 desoldering gun is always nice to have, but it is expensive.









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larryd

@JohnRob
The technique is useful for prototyping circuits.

As mentioned previousely in the thread, you can also punch out copper pads form 1/32" PCB material to do something similar (or even combine the two methods together ;) ).







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