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Topic: [answered] Servo signal voltage (Read 499 times) previous topic - next topic

manor_royal

Jan 13, 2017, 06:18 am Last Edit: Jan 13, 2017, 10:26 am by manor_royal
I've only ever used a servo on an Uno (might have used a 5V Trinket too, can't remember.) A scope trace from the Uno shows the servo signal (not the power, I know the difference ;) and know to power a servo from its own 5-6V supply) as a tad under 5V.

Question is then, if one uses a 3V3 micro like a 3V3 Trinket or a Due, is the servo signal then only at 3V3, and if so, is that enough to control a 5-6V servo?
If this was a Civil Engineering forum would there be posts like "I need to build a bridge. Someone send me drawings."

AWOL

That depends on the servo

manor_royal

That depends on the servo
Probably, but I wonder how one would know, other than by experiment? The servodatabase doesn't seem to have the signal voltage as a field.

If this was a Civil Engineering forum would there be posts like "I need to build a bridge. Someone send me drawings."

manor_royal

I found this at Pololu, posting for others' benefit:

Quote
... the pulse voltage can vary quite a bit. Modern receivers have 3.0 V signals, but many servo controllers use 5.0 V or more. For the most part, this signal amplitude does not matter too much, as a long as it is high enough for the servo to register the pulses, and the valid range is perfect for interfacing directly to a microcontroller that is running at 3.3 V or 5.0 V
If this was a Civil Engineering forum would there be posts like "I need to build a bridge. Someone send me drawings."

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