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Topic: What makes an Arduino course worth paying for? (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

ubuffman2001

There are many free tutorials available for Arduino, but I am wondering what a course could offer that would make you pay for it?

Just brainstorming, my thoughts are:
- more detailed explanations
- complete BOM
- complete sketches that actually work
- support from instructor

Your thoughts?

CrossRoads

To expand:
- more detailed explanations of:
> simple electronics and basic methods of connecting them - see http://www.pighixxx.com/
> more complex electronics - shift registers, IO expanders, temperature sensors, etc.
> interacting with electronics: analogRead/Write, digitalRead/Write, SPI, I2C, etc.
> PC to uC comms,, uC to uC comms, uC to other devices
>> Serial, SPI, I2C, Bluetooth, simple RF (oneway 433 MHz), transceivers (nrf24L01+, Zigbee, etc.)
>networking - Ethernet, wireless, IoT - could be a whole course right there.

- complete BOM
> of what?

- complete sketches that work
> doing what? need electronics connected up to show anything besides C++ software running

- support from instructor
> in C++
> in hardware

I think my book covers a lot of the above, you should take a look. It doesn't go into hardcore C++ programming, there are already tons of books on that.
https://www.amazon.com/Arduino-Teens-Robert-Patterson/dp/1285420896/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1490722142&sr=1-1&keywords=arduino+for+teens
If you're thinking just a weekend kind of course where students connect up designs they are handed and run sketches they copy & paste, that's just following a cookbook and doesn't teach much, in my opinion, but does introduce them to basics. There will be plenty who just don't get programming and you could get bogged down in explaining how to use basic libraries (like Serial.available() and Serial.read() and Serial.write vs Serial.print), or the basic math of Ohms Law and Kirchhoff's voltage law , and there is lots of stuff you can't really get into in much depth (like why a collapsing magnetic field in a coil generates current and dissipating it with a diode can save your drive transistor), etc.

A weeklong course with required reading and practicing after class to demo & ask questions the next day, that could be useful towards getting the info understood and demonstrated.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

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