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Topic: "Fastest" Arduino compatible board (Read 22937 times) previous topic - next topic

ard_newbie


Make yourself a favor, buy an arduino DUE (~ $12).

PaulRB

#16
Jan 05, 2019, 07:50 pm Last Edit: Jan 05, 2019, 07:59 pm by PaulRB
I have been using esp8266 boards for some time and have found very few compatibility issues with libraries and sketches. The libraries and sketches that don't work usually rely on CPU registers and instructions that are unique to the ATmega series of chips. Often, they are not even compatible with the entire ATmega range, just the atmega328 and atmega1280. These libraries and sketches won't be compatible with samd21/Zero either. Over time, they will either be updated, if they are valuable, or abandoned. But sketches and libraries that don't rely on features unique to ATmega chips generally run absolutely fine on esp, samd21, stm32 etc.

Quote
I live outside the US ... A few extra pounds...
There are lots of us Brits on the forum. Yes, some US items can seem less good value for the money, especially with the value of Sterling at the moment. Have you tried Pimoroni, Pi Hut, HobbyTronics?

ningaman151

Make yourself a favor, buy an arduino DUE (~ $12).
I did. It's been out for a while though, feels outdated.

ningaman151

#18
Jan 06, 2019, 02:25 pm Last Edit: Jan 06, 2019, 03:04 pm by ningaman151
I have been using esp8266 boards for some time and have found very few compatibility issues with libraries and sketches. The libraries and sketches that don't work usually rely on CPU registers and instructions that are unique to the ATmega series of chips. Often, they are not even compatible with the entire ATmega range, just the atmega328 and atmega1280. These libraries and sketches won't be compatible with samd21/Zero either. Over time, they will either be updated, if they are valuable, or abandoned. But sketches and libraries that don't rely on features unique to ATmega chips generally run absolutely fine on esp, samd21, stm32 etc.
There are lots of us Brits on the forum. Yes, some US items can seem less good value for the money, especially with the value of Sterling at the moment. Have you tried Pimoroni, Pi Hut, HobbyTronics?
I ordered a bunch of different boards a few months ago; black/blue pills, nanos, due, megas in compact form factor and in standard, esp32, esp8266. The megas, nanos and dues are all clones from aliexpress. Trouble is that they're in Germany while I'm in the UK. I could get them here somehow, or order some Zeros or even a Teensy. As you said, the esp boards look like the best bang for buck, what do you think of the esp32 since I have one of those too? Also makes it easier to add wifi later on if needed, and I definitely require bluetooth often. Do the much higher clock speeds on the esp boards compared to the teensy, stm32, and M0 translate to better performance? Between the 32 bit boards, is there enough difference to make it matter?

I checked out the Teensy LC and Tau. They look good, but I would prefer if the boards were open source so they would be available from different vendors, and in the case of the Tau, a bigger userbase. Also, with the M0 boards each one has a different amount of RAM and flash, is this is an issue when uploading sketches?

I mentioned the price because as you know the price in dollars will be the same amount but in pounds in the UK, I've looked at different vendors and the prices are pretty much identical. For example on HobbyTronics a Teensy 3.2 is 19.80 pounds while it's 19.80 US dollars on pjrc.

PaulRB

#19
Jan 06, 2019, 04:50 pm Last Edit: Jan 06, 2019, 04:59 pm by PaulRB
I've never used an esp32 yet. I can see they have some advantages I'm sure I would find useful on some potential projects. But at the moment my focus is more towards re-designing the sensors and weather station I built previously, to make them much lower power and last ideally a year+ on modest size batteries. So I'm moving away from WiFi (never been a big fan of Bluetooth anyway) towards LoRa.

As for performance of the various 32-bit Arduinos, it all depends on what you are doing with them. For some purposes, like monitoring and controlling digital inputs and outputs, they are often no faster than the 8-bit AVRs. The AVRs are very efficient at many types of tasks. But where WiFi/Bluetooth/LoRaWAN is needed, more ram memory, flash memory and clock speed are a big plus. There are modern, resource-heavy protocols to be dealt with like network stacks and encryption. My LoRaWAN nodes based on ATMega328 are close to the limits, for example.

Of course, you can get modules which relieve a slower 8-bit MCU of these tasks, such as the commonly used Bluetooth modules or the ESP-01 WiFi adaptor. But I don't really like the idea of using a more powerful MCU as an add-on module to make up for the limitations of a less powerful MCU. To me, that feels like pulling a sports car along with a horse. Why not just use a single, more powerful MCU by itself? But that's just how I feel.

MartinL

Looks like Adafruit have just released their new SAMD51 based Arduino Mega style "Metro M4 Grand Central" board: https://www.adafruit.com/product/4064.

ningaman151

Looks like Adafruit have just released their new SAMD51 based Arduino Mega style "Metro M4 Grand Central" board: https://www.adafruit.com/product/4064.
Looks good but way too much on the pricy side and big form factor. Although looks like a good upgrade to the Mega. I'll keep it in mind.

MartinL

#22
Jan 07, 2019, 09:56 am Last Edit: Jan 07, 2019, 11:41 am by MartinL
I'd have to agree with westfw, both PJRC's Teensy boards and Adafruit's Feather/Itsy Bitsy M4 boards are great, offering very powerful microcontrollers in a small form factor.

The ESP32 is another option for Internet Of Things (IOT) projects and nowadays the Arduino IDE support is very good, although personally I wouldn't use it for any non-IOT development, despite its blistering speed. The ESP32's technical datasheet and on-chip peripherials are somewhat rudimentary and lack the more advanced features found on ARM based microcontrollers. Although in fairness this isn't the ESP32's primary focus.

Also, programming the ESP32's registers is made difficult by the lack of register definition files, files that are supplied with most other microcontrollers. Espressif instead practically force you to use their closed source ESP32 API functions. The ESP32's registers are (in my opinion) a bit cryptic and not as nice to work with either.

That said the ESP32 is great for IOT projects, or if you're just using its existing libraries.

If form factor isn't an issue, then as ard_newbie mentioned, the Arduino Due is another outstanding board. On technical specification alone it should've become Arduino's flagship product and easily outpaces the Mega in terms of performance, but was perhaps produced too far ahead of its time (back in 2012). The Due's SAM3X8E microcontroller might gradually be getting a bit long in the tooth by today's standards, but it's nevertheless still a very capable processor with a lot of on-chip peripherals and IO pins.

franekz

I have created an Arduino board for myself. 480MHz clock speed, 1MB SRAM 2MB FLASH. With some stuff already on board (like 6 servo connectors) STMH7 uC used

ningaman151

I have created an Arduino board for myself. 480MHz clock speed, 1MB SRAM 2MB FLASH. With some stuff already on board (like 6 servo connectors) STMH7 uC used
Nice! How did you do that? Like how did you get the bootloader working? Can you share the details of your project please?

franekz

Nice! How did you do that? Like how did you get the bootloader working? Can you share the details of your project please?
Yes the whole project will be OH & OSD. Still working on it. Bootloader is a bit more complicated as in the original arduino.

I will pull it to gitlab when ready :)

tf68

https://www.pjrc.com/store/teensy40.html
Teensy 4.0 features an ARM Cortex-M7 processor at 600 MHz, with a NXP iMXRT1062 chip, the fastest microcontroller available today.

ningaman151

https://www.pjrc.com/store/teensy40.html
Teensy 4.0 features an ARM Cortex-M7 processor at 600 MHz, with a NXP iMXRT1062 chip, the fastest microcontroller available today.
Wow that's amazing!! I guess I'll use this in the meantime franekz completes his project! Thanks a lot for sharing!! ☺️

ningaman151

https://www.pjrc.com/store/teensy40.html
Teensy 4.0 features an ARM Cortex-M7 processor at 600 MHz, with a NXP iMXRT1062 chip, the fastest microcontroller available today.
I'm afraid it's too pricey!! It costs 13 dollars to ship here, a shame really, but I think I'll get one regardless

Poki

STMicro has Cortex M7 boards. 480 MHz so not as fast as a Teensy 4 but it breaks out lots more pins. 2 Mbytes Flash, 1 Mbyte RAM. So many boards, so little time. The board. The uC.

This board is listed as supported by the ST Micro Arduino Core. There are other ST Micro H7 boards but they are not listed as having Arduino support. I have not tried this board yet.



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