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Topic: Where to buy a springboard type prototyping breadboard?  (Read 393 times) previous topic - next topic

Doug101

I'm trying to find where I can buy a prototyping breadboard which uses springs? I need it for stranded and larger wires which won't fit into the common solderless breadboards.

I found a picture of the exact one I use to have.  Anyone know where I can buy one today?  Or what they were called so maybe I could find one on eBay?

Thanks


PaulRB


I can see springs fixed to the wood blocks with screws. What are the beige blocks with the arrays of rectangular objects? Can't make out what they are for.

PerryBebbington

Last time I saw anything like that was a child's electronic teaching kit, when I was a boy in the 1960s and 1970s!

Looks pretty home made, buy some springs, a board and some screws.

TomGeorge

Hi,
This link will help;
https://makezine.com/projects/make-39/springboard/

It is a creation from a maker, after receiving some original units.
I believe it even includes construction files of his version.

Tom... :)
Everything runs on smoke, let the smoke out, it stops running....

Paul__B

It is a creation from a maker, after receiving some original units.
I believe it even includes construction files of his version.
Yeah, and circuit 3 is going to go down really well!

wvmarle

Quality of answers is related to the quality of questions. Good questions will get good answers. Useless answers are a sign of a poor question.

PaulRB

I need it for stranded and larger wires which won't fit into the common solderless breadboards.
For stranded wire, strip 5mm insulation off the ends, twist the strands neatly and tin with solder. Usually easy to insert into ordinary breadboard after that.

As for larger wires, why are you using them? If because of larger currents, then you shouldn't pass more than. 1A through a breadboard anyway. For temporary prototyping with high currents, keep those wires away from breadboard and use terminal strips instead.

Doug101

For stranded wire, strip 5mm insulation off the ends, twist the strands neatly and tin with solder. Usually easy to insert into ordinary breadboard after that.

As for larger wires, why are you using them? If because of larger currents, then you shouldn't pass more than. 1A through a breadboard anyway. For temporary prototyping with high currents, keep those wires away from breadboard and use terminal strips instead.
The reason I'm using larger wires is because they are attached to the sensors and switches I am prototyping with.  Yes I could strip the wires and solder them or solder on a solid piece of wire but that would take a lot of time and then for the finished product I would have to cut them off.

Larger wire isn't always used for higher current, sometimes it's for durability.

For my application the springboard prototyping board is the perfect solution.


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