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Topic: what i have been up to, thus far. (Read 51032 times) previous topic - next topic

GoForSmoke

1) http://gammon.com.au/blink  <-- tasking Arduino 1-2-3
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial <-- techniques howto
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts
Your sketch can sense ongoing process events in time.
Your sketch can make events to control it over time.

GoForSmoke

1) http://gammon.com.au/blink  <-- tasking Arduino 1-2-3
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial <-- techniques howto
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts
Your sketch can sense ongoing process events in time.
Your sketch can make events to control it over time.

TKall

Congratulations on a successful first run!

TKall

The first thing I used my CNC for was to cut acrylic sheets that I used to mount MEGA's to DIN rail.  It worked quite well.

TKall

The acrylic has a tendency to gum up.  I'm still a total newbie.  LarryD is a good resource.

Qdeathstar

you could potentially add counterweights on the z axis. People do that with deltas for flying extruded mods. Alternatively, you could get some pulleys and use them to drive the z axis to gain some mechanical advantage. Springs seem like they might increase backlash, but if you don't do any/a lot of z-lifts then it doesn't matter to much, maybe.
A creaking creeping shadow
stiff against the freezing fog
glares at a tickless watch.

Time has failed him -- all things shall pass.

GoForSmoke

If anything is being harvested maybe get a bunch cheap? Peas maybe, they taste so good fresh.

Or get down the coast and buy lobsta off the pier?

There's someone in Franklin Co. with a laser tag arena but I dunno if it's up and going yet.

Some time look on youtube for warping concrete. It's glass fiber reinforced (GFRC), they pour out flat shapes, wait for it to set a bit then bend the crete like you would steamed wood.

Look a bit more into fiber-crete with wood shavings or paper pulp. If you like it, you might take it somewhere.
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink  <-- tasking Arduino 1-2-3
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial <-- techniques howto
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts
Your sketch can sense ongoing process events in time.
Your sketch can make events to control it over time.

GoForSmoke

i also have to work on the Hall-Effect home/limit switches for my CNC, as well as devise a way to help support the Z-axis.

~Travis
If you set the linear Hall sensor and magnet up and then slide a piece of steel (can metal will do) in between, it should read less to nothing.

If you can read the magnet through a hole in one piece of steel and slide another in to shut it off then you have diminished the sense area. I have no real idea of how small a hole can work.

If you move the magnet across the direction that the Hall sensor points, the read values should peak when they are directly across from each other as long as the magnet is pointing at the Hall switch right then.

Make yourself a Hall sensor wand and have fun probing magnets and EM fields. If you combine a magnet and Hall sensor then you should be able to detect moving non-magnetic metals. You can use the wand to detect EMF in your own projects.
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink  <-- tasking Arduino 1-2-3
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial <-- techniques howto
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts
Your sketch can sense ongoing process events in time.
Your sketch can make events to control it over time.

GoForSmoke

You need a Linear Hall Sensor, not a Hall Switch. The Hall Effect is used in many different devices, just because it says Hall doesn't mean it's the Hall you want. For your limit switch, maybe good but for probing EM fields and finding out what's going on you'll want the linear sensor and probably some kind of sensitivity control circuit.

You might want the linear Hall finding where the magnet field is strongest as that may provide your best zero.

A linear Hall sensor has a direction along which it measures field strength. You get strength and direction. If you make a wand that points in the direction and lets you get the sensor away from your hand then you can find the invisible shape of the field.

You can get more precise stops with light and use the Hall or cap sense to tell the motor to slow down, fwiw.

With 2 slits and a red led you can probably get an interference pattern. That will gives bands of light to sense and if the distance from slits to sensor is small, the distance between bands wil be smaller... you'd need to mask the sensor to see only narrow light or dark band alone.  And no, you don't have to have a laser to do the double-slit experiment, it's just more clear with one.
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink  <-- tasking Arduino 1-2-3
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial <-- techniques howto
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts
Your sketch can sense ongoing process events in time.
Your sketch can make events to control it over time.

GoForSmoke

Quote
I was steered away from optical (on CNCzone), as the router dust may obstruct the sensor, unless i build it into a sealed mechanical sensor that passes a vane through the sensor. seemed like hall would be easier to implement, of the non-mechanical sensors.
So true about the dust and all.

With the linear Hall you can delineate mag field through or not holes or slots in sheet steel, or how moving metal affects an existing field (gear tooth counter) or whatever else might seem neat for whatever use it may have.

1) http://gammon.com.au/blink  <-- tasking Arduino 1-2-3
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial <-- techniques howto
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts
Your sketch can sense ongoing process events in time.
Your sketch can make events to control it over time.

larryd

You will have to throw the saw away now!

Once they taste blood, they become to habituated to it.



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No technical PMs.
If you are asked a question, please respond with an answer.
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If you need clarification, ask for help.

GoForSmoke

Did anyone else show up before you got clear of the intersection?
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink  <-- tasking Arduino 1-2-3
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial <-- techniques howto
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts
Your sketch can sense ongoing process events in time.
Your sketch can make events to control it over time.

GoForSmoke

What wattage is your iron? Mine's got a dial.
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink  <-- tasking Arduino 1-2-3
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial <-- techniques howto
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts
Your sketch can sense ongoing process events in time.
Your sketch can make events to control it over time.

Paul_KD7HB

I thought my soldering skills were at least passable, until i tried to solder a PL-259 connector on to RG-8X cable.  :o
first try: melted the foam core, shorted.
second try: works, no shorts.
third try: melted the foam core, shorted.

i tried my electronics soldering iron first, and got a lot of gobs of cold solder due to the thermal mass of the PL-259. then i tried a small butane torch. no more cold solder, but the heat is a bit too intense. the you-tube videos make it look so easy. and i tried desoldering the connectors for re-use, and only managed to completely melt the insulator.

~Travis
Bet you got the cheap nickle plated units.

Paul

GoForSmoke

my linear Hall sensors should arrive tomorrow :D
Time to investigate magnetic fields?
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink  <-- tasking Arduino 1-2-3
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial <-- techniques howto
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts
Your sketch can sense ongoing process events in time.
Your sketch can make events to control it over time.

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