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Topic: [Poll] What is your biggest problem learning Arduino? (Read 2144 times) previous topic - next topic

jmo

Hi all,

I'm gonna buy my first Arduino board very soon. Out of curiosity I wanted to know what was your biggest issue when learning Arduino?


Thanks for your participation!

Robin2

That's going to vary depending on the level of knowledge a user already has before first trying an Arduino.

What is your level of knowledge? That will help others coming from the same starting point to give you advice.

For example, if you have done no programming then my experience with learning Arduinos would probably be irrelevant.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

jmo

Hi Robin2,

Thanks for your answer.

My level of knowledge is that I'm a software engineer, so I know how to program in C/C++ but I know (almost) nothing about electronic or hardware.

Robin2

Then you must know a great deal more about programming than I do, If your experience is with programming on PCs I suggest you think carefully about the need to be very economical when you have only 2k of SRAM.

As far as the electronics and hardware is concerned I am entirely self-taught (if you could call it teaching) and I am a lot less confident with electronics than I am with programming. To my mind the scope is so enormous that it may be easier to identify a project and then learn what is needed to get it to work.

A basic knowledge of electricity - volts, amps, watts, watt-hrs, amp-hrs etc seems to me to be important. Many questions from newbies demonstrate deep ignorance of the subject and its absence can make communication difficult when people have problems.

A general understanding of components such as resistors, capacitors, transistors etc is also useful but you could probably get a great deal done without ever needing the deeper knowledge to design a transistor circuit.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

jmo

I planned to use Arduino to learn electronic in an interesting and practical way. I have some basic knowledge about electronic but I deeply lack the practice.

Thanks for your great feedback!

Johan_Ha

I know C/C++, but I know almost nothing about electronics. But nothing about that has caused any problems. My issues are about writing the code and knowing the right keywords, like analogWrite(). I'm a total noob to Arduino and I simply haven't gathered all stuff around me, when I start writing code. I need library reference pdf:s, code examples and a coup of coffee around me.
I mainly struggle with the electronics, like how to choose a capacitor and for what purpose. But as I wrote, no big problems. If I must mention one problem that I'd want solved, it's finding time for all this cool stuff.
____________________

If you ask for help and write 'u' instead of 'you' because you think it's convenient, I will write 'no' instead of 'yes'. For same reasons.


Robin2

Quote
My issues are about writing the code and knowing the right keywords, like analogWrite().
A lot depends on how you like to learn things. If you like learning by doing then the Arduino IDE comes with a lot of simple examples. Spend some time studying them and referring to the Learning section of this website.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

GolamMostafa

#8
Jun 10, 2017, 02:50 pm Last Edit: Jun 10, 2017, 06:24 pm by GolamMostafa
Quote
If you like learning by doing then the Arduino IDE comes with a lot of simple examples.
Very cool to see common line of thinking; an anonymous writer have been telling the same thing to his co-learners for many years about self-learning.


//==============================================================
Preface

First of all, you must say that you wish to learn 'things'. And only then, we may tell you something like: "Look for the things that work and play with them". This is one of the proven methods of 'Self Learning'.

This book is written for those who are willing to learn things by doing themselves. Take an experiment and 'follow' every step. Be patient and keep waiting until you are rewarded with a result.

Now, you have an experiment, which works. Repeatedly study and practice every step of the experiment. You will soon discover the reasons for including so many steps in the experiment. Try to build the experiment in your own way. Execute your experiment and monitor the result.

Good Luck!


21/4/17, 15/10/15, 15/10/14, 6/11/13, 6/1/09

//================================================================


ballscrewbob

It may not be the answer you were looking for but its the one I am giving based on either experience, educated guess, google or the fact that you gave nothing to go with in the first place so I used my wonky crystal ball.

GolamMostafa

@ballscrewbob

Scriptures of the monotheistic religions say: Men ultimately took the responsibility of taking care of themselves and the environment; but, they stood unjust!

//------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Jabur, The Toha, The Bible, and The Quran are carrying messages of utmost importance for the maintenance of human race in this world and then the after world. Traditionally, people use capital letters while writing the names of these scriptures to qualify their singularities.  For the time immemorial, people are ending their lives in this world, and none of them returned. Where do they go? No where! Everything comes to termination as one dies. The Poet, by virtue of his super intellect, denies to see his non-existence even after his death! Who is talking sensible? None or both? Everything is relatively flowing on its own course!  They interact or we make them to interact; new events appear; are they illusions? or are we hallucinated? or are they true as we are true?
//------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Robin2

Scriptures of the monotheistic religions say: Men ultimately took the responsibility of taking care of themselves and the environment; but, they stood unjust!

//------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Jabur, The Toha, The Bible, and The Quran are carrying messages of utmost importance for the maintenance of human race in this world and then the after world. Traditionally, people use capital letters while writing the names of these scriptures to qualify their singularities.  For the time immemorial, people are ending their lives in this world, and none of them returned. Where do they go? No where! Everything comes to termination as one dies. The Poet, by virtue of his super intellect, denies to see his non-existence even after his death! Who is talking sensible? None or both? Everything is relatively flowing on its own course!  They interact or we make them to interact; new events appear; are they illusions? or are we hallucinated? or are they true as we are true?
//------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
If that was a picture I would post it on the Wall Of Shame Thread :)

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

GolamMostafa

#12
Jun 11, 2017, 11:15 am Last Edit: Jun 11, 2017, 11:36 am by GolamMostafa
Who knows? We are abundantly free! :)

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