Go Down

Topic: how to wire up 36W 12V LED Spot Lights with external 12v battery on arduino ? (Read 988 times) previous topic - next topic

MEKACI

For my robotic project, I bought x2 " 36W Car 12V LED Work Spot Lights Spotlight Lamp 4x4 Van ATV Offroad SUV Truck" from ebay: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/401096541631?_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

Firstly,
What kind of battery do I need to buy for this spotlight and it will work on arduino without any problems ? It will be nice if you can give a link for the needed battery that is suitable with these options. Rechargeable version should be nice for the battery.

Secondly,
Would you show me / teach me how to connect, wire up and what do I need to achieve to control leds with better brightness for this spot lights ( with this external power supply battery ) to arduino ?

I don't want to burn my original arduino mega 2560 r3  and I never tried such a thing before with arduino too; so I came here to ask your guidance.

I will be very happy if you anyone help me, I look forward your precious comments here. Take care yourself and have a nice day, thank you very much.

Paul_KD7HB

What exactly do you have in mind for the Arduino to do? Since the light is designed for a car battery, I guess you should first try a car battery and get the light to work. Surely the light came with some wiring instructions.

Paul

DrAzzy

That one specs input voltage 10~36v, implying that it has it's own switching converter and power supply inside.

You can switch the power to it on and off under arduino control with a MOSFET, but unless it has dimming control within the light (ie, an extra wire brought out to set the brightness), which the listing makes no mention of, you can't adjust the brightness of those - as the module's built-in switching power supply is trying to keep the light running at the fixed brightness.
ATtiny core for 841+1634+828 and x313/x4/x5/x61/x7/x8 series Board Manager:
http://drazzy.com/package_drazzy.com_index.json
ATtiny breakouts (some assembled), mosfets and awesome prototyping board in my store http://tindie.com/stores/DrAzzy

DVDdoug

36W at 12V is 3 Amps  (36/12). 


If they are 36W each, that's 7 Amps total (if you believe any specs from random-unknown suppliers on eBay ;) ).

Quote
What kind of battery do I need to buy for this spotlight and it will work on arduino without any problems ?
Obviously, you need a 12V battery.  A 3 Amp-Hour (3000mAhr) would last about an hour with one light and about 1/2 hour with both lights.   A 100 Amp-Hour car battery would last "all day".

If you're using a power supply, you need a 12V power supply rated at 7 Amps or more.

Depending on the design of the power supply built-into the lamps the lights may begin to dim as the battery discharges (and you may get less time than the calculated "amp hours") or they may remain bright slightly beyond the rated/calculated battery time.

Quote
Would you show me / teach me how to connect, wire up and what do I need to achieve to control leds with better brightness for this spot lights ( with this external power supply battery ) to arduino ?
The brightness you get at 12V is as bright as it's going to get.   

If your battery (or power supply) can't put-out the full 3A or 7A, the voltage will "sag" and they might be dim.   (And, you might burn-up your power supply.)   Do you have a multimeter to measure the voltage from the battery with the lamps connected?

Quote
I don't want to burn my original arduino mega 2560 r3  and I never tried such a thing before with arduino too; so I came here to ask your guidance.
You cannot connect the lamps directly to the Arduino.   You can use a relay or a MOSFET driver circuit.   A "regular" relay will need a driver, or you can get little relay boards with the driver already built-in.



MEKACI

36W at 12V is 3 Amps  (36/12).  


If they are 36W each, that's 7 Amps total (if you believe any specs from random-unknown suppliers on eBay ;) ).
Obviously, you need a 12V battery.   A 3 Amp-Hour (3000mAhr) would last about an hour with one light and about 1/2 hour with both lights.   A 100 Amp-Hour car battery would last "all day".

If you're using a power supply, you need a 12V power supply rated at 7 Amps or more.

Depending on the design of the power supply built-into the lamps the lights may begin to dim as the battery discharges (and you may get less time than the calculated "amp hours") or they may remain bright slightly beyond the rated/calculated battery time.
 The brightness you get at 12V is as bright as it's going to get.  

If your battery (or power supply) can't put-out the full 3A or 7A, the voltage will "sag" and they might be dim.   (And, you might burn-up your power supply.)   Do you have a multimeter to measure the voltage from the battery with the lamps connected?
You cannot connect the lamps directly to the Arduino.   You can use a relay or a MOSFET driver circuit.   A "regular" relay will need a driver, or you can get little relay boards with the driver already built-in.



At my project, I am using a RC radio controller and what I want to do is this " when I click to switch it will turn on the lights as extra effect^^ ".

Would you tell me please which relay board or Mosfet driver circuit do I need that would you give me some links where to buy them ( I don't want to buy a wrong product ) ? and maybe even some tutorial links for that product ? I never used the things you said before. And how we do code a relay board too on arduino ? thank you very much.

what kind of battery do I need to buy for the spot light I bought to get best brightness ( there are lot's of battery types so I want to buy a good one for that spot lights as extra too ), it will be nice if you give me some links for that too if it is possible ? tyvm.

Many things appear in the internet so as a newbie, I don't want to learn wrong things. I will be happy if you give some links to guide me much further.

And if it is possible, would you show me a diagram how to wire all of these into arduino too please ? tyvm.


MEKACI

I ordered this relay board for arduino : 16-Channel 12V Relay Module ( http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/261370539080?_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT ).

For the questions I asked in my comment above, still noone replied back to them. I hope that someone reply back and I learn this subject good and then I can apply it to my project successfully myself too. I will use external power supply and I plan to use this : Yuasa NP7-12, 12V 7Ah lead acid battery NP7-12 ( https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B000V3QT42/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_3?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A26QVCZKBXZDON ).

Then with buttons I want to power on and off my spot lights ( http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/401096541631?_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT ) with the help of this 16 channel relay board Arduino.



Note ( as extra question ):
For this spot light ( a different version ) " 2 x 125W Motorcycle Motorbike LED U5 Headlight Driving Fog Spot Lights ", what kind of battery do I need in volts and ampers ? thank you very much.
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/282210814700?_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

MEKACI


Wawa

Note ( as extra question ):
For this spot light ( a different version ) " 2 x 125W Motorcycle Motorbike LED U5 Headlight Driving Fog Spot Lights ", what kind of battery do I need in volts and ampers ?
Read the fine print.
These are 15watt LED spot lights (not flood lights) that might produce the same light as a 125watt lightbulb (if you believe that claim). They need 12volt (minimum), so also work on a 12volt car battery.
Current draw is 15watt/12volt = 1.25Amp.
You shouldn't drain a lead/acid battery more than 50%.
So you get about 3hours with one of these lights and a 7Ah lead/acid battery.

Lots of tutorials out there how to connect a relay board to an Arduino.
Most 16-channel boards also have a switching 5volt supply fitted, so can power your Arduino at the same time.
Post a diagram of how YOU think you should wire it up, and we will check it.
Leo..

MEKACI

At the end, I have done it successfully, this is the video I made: https://youtu.be/1-F3Nd9OLrA


Go Up