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Topic: Unable to upload to Arduino Uno (Read 3375 times) previous topic - next topic

MrComputerIlliterate

Hey all,

Sorry in advance for what has probably been resolved dozens of times before... I've spent the last several hours trying to get this thing working, and finally came to the conclusion that I need to ask for help.

I got a "Kumon" brand Uno R3 board as a gift, and am excited to delve into unfamiliar territory, but I'm very inept. I installed the Arduino software, plugged in the board, and was elated when the on-board LED started blinking. I tried putting an LED into ground and grid 13--good so far. Then I decided to try uploading one of the "example>basic" sketches. No such luck. I've been busy trying to figure out why I can't upload a sketch, and how I might resolve this issue, but I'm completely stuck.


Under Tools>Board I have "Arduino/Genuino Uno" selected. Under Tools>Port I have "COM1" selected. After digging around online, my assumption is that it's the cliched port issue, but I can't seem to resolve it. Under Tools>Board, [serial port] is grayed out, so I can't select anything new. I opened up my Device Manager, and I don't see the Arduino Board listed. I read that it sometimes isn't properly listed under [Ports], but I don't see it anywhere else either. I read that sometimes it's improperly named and just needs to be right-clicked and updated, but again, I don't see it anywhere on here.

I thought that maybe the driver hadn't reinstalled properly, so I tried uninstalling and reinstalling the Arduino software and making sure that the checkbox for "install driver" was selected. Still nothing.


My OS is Windows 8.1, and the error message I'm receiving is:


Arduino: 1.8.3 (Windows 8.1), Board: "Arduino/Genuino Uno"

Sketch uses 928 bytes (2%) of program storage space. Maximum is 32256 bytes.
Global variables use 9 bytes (0%) of dynamic memory, leaving 2039 bytes for local variables. Maximum is 2048 bytes.
avrdude: stk500_recv(): programmer is not responding
avrdude: stk500_getsync() attempt 1 of 10: not in sync: resp=0xf7
avrdude: stk500_recv(): programmer is not responding
avrdude: stk500_getsync() attempt 2 of 10: not in sync: resp=0xf7
avrdude: stk500_recv(): programmer is not responding
avrdude: stk500_getsync() attempt 3 of 10: not in sync: resp=0xf7
avrdude: stk500_recv(): programmer is not responding
avrdude: stk500_getsync() attempt 4 of 10: not in sync: resp=0xf7
avrdude: stk500_recv(): programmer is not responding
avrdude: stk500_getsync() attempt 5 of 10: not in sync: resp=0xf7
avrdude: stk500_recv(): programmer is not responding
avrdude: stk500_getsync() attempt 6 of 10: not in sync: resp=0xf7
avrdude: stk500_recv(): programmer is not responding
avrdude: stk500_getsync() attempt 7 of 10: not in sync: resp=0xf7
avrdude: stk500_recv(): programmer is not responding
avrdude: stk500_getsync() attempt 8 of 10: not in sync: resp=0xf7
avrdude: stk500_recv(): programmer is not responding
avrdude: stk500_getsync() attempt 9 of 10: not in sync: resp=0xf7
avrdude: stk500_recv(): programmer is not responding
avrdude: stk500_getsync() attempt 10 of 10: not in sync: resp=0xf7
Problem uploading to board.  See http://www.arduino.cc/en/Guide/Troubleshooting#upload for suggestions.

This report would have more information with
"Show verbose output during compilation"
option enabled in File -> Preferences.



Any help will be hugely appreciated. I'm excited to try something new, but I am embarrassingly ignorant when it comes to anything computer related. Hopefully the Arduino Uno will be a step in the right direction for overcoming this.  ;)



Ballscrewbob2

Its hard to tell from the pictures of that board what USB chip it is using.
Could you post a decent pic of the chip near the USB port and or the text that is written on it ?

It could be using the FTDI chip but so long as it is not a CH340/341 the drivers in the Arduino install folder should do the trick.

Should be located here
C:\Program Files (x86)\Arduino\drivers


If you are running x 64 then fire up "dpinst-amd64" ignore that it says AMD if you are on an INTEL cpu as it covers both.
If you are running less than x64 fire up "dpinst-x86"

Do as ADMINISTRATOR as in some cases this can make a difference.
If you get any "driver signing" issues either ignore them or google how to remove that restriction.


It may not be the answer you were looking for but its the one I am giving based on either experience, educated guess, google or the fact that you gave nothing to go with in the first place so I used my wonky crystal ball.

MrComputerIlliterate

#2
Aug 03, 2017, 06:52 pm Last Edit: Aug 03, 2017, 06:59 pm by MrComputerIlliterate
Its hard to tell from the pictures of that board what USB chip it is using.
Could you post a decent pic of the chip near the USB port and or the text that is written on it ?

It could be using the FTDI chip but so long as it is not a CH340/341 the drivers in the Arduino install folder should do the trick.

Should be located here
C:\Program Files (x86)\Arduino\drivers


If you are running x 64 then fire up "dpinst-amd64" ignore that it says AMD if you are on an INTEL cpu as it covers both.
If you are running less than x64 fire up "dpinst-x86"

Do as ADMINISTRATOR as in some cases this can make a difference.
If you get any "driver signing" issues either ignore them or google how to remove that restriction.


Thank you for the reply, Ballscrewbob2. I gave your suggestion a try, but nothing came of it. :( If you have any other ideas on things I can try, I'd really appreciate it. Here's a picture of my board: http://imgur.com/U5Oft8H .


Ballscrewbob2

The pic isnt really good enough of the chip near the USB connector nor did you say what is written.
It does not look like a CH340 which is usually a good sign unless its a counterfeit FTDI in which case you might have to play with drivers a little more to get it to work.

Are you aware that USB 3.0 ports and cables can cause issues with Arduino ?
Best no to use them unless they are verified as working for Arduinos.
Even then they may not work for all Arduinos

It may not be the answer you were looking for but its the one I am giving based on either experience, educated guess, google or the fact that you gave nothing to go with in the first place so I used my wonky crystal ball.

MrComputerIlliterate

The pic isnt really good enough of the chip near the USB connector nor did you say what is written.
It does not look like a CH340 which is usually a good sign unless its a counterfeit FTDI in which case you might have to play with drivers a little more to get it to work.

Are you aware that USB 3.0 ports and cables can cause issues with Arduino ?
Best no to use them unless they are verified as working for Arduinos.
Even then they may not work for all Arduinos


Unfortunately I don't have a better camera at the moment. :/ It's hard to make out what the chip next to the USB connector says, so this may have some typos.

For the microcontroller directly behind the USB port, it says:

ATMEL
mega 16u2
1550 PH
A7VUMA

For the long micrcontroller on the back-left side, it says:

ATMEL
1619
ATMEGA328P-PU


I wasn't aware that USB 3.0 ports and cables can cause issues. That's good to know, thanks. It looks like my ports and cable are USB 2.0, though.

Ballscrewbob2

And the chip is the correct one too so that should not be an issue unless it has had any form of over / reverse voltage applied in which case those chips have a tendency to die much too easy for my liking which is why I stay around the 10 volt or under range.

Clones are much better in that department but tend to have higher noise factors on signals.

Under windows it wont be COM 1 (thats windows default port) so double check its not listed elsewhere in device manager. 

I would love to see Arduino have some trusted RDP experts to be able to fix some of these things as its often something quite simple.
It may not be the answer you were looking for but its the one I am giving based on either experience, educated guess, google or the fact that you gave nothing to go with in the first place so I used my wonky crystal ball.

Arduino_Beginner

Is it your first time you work with this board ?
If so, it might be drivers issue.
If it was working with you, it might be cable issue or something on the board blown up.

MrComputerIlliterate

And the chip is the correct one too so that should not be an issue unless it has had any form of over / reverse voltage applied in which case those chips have a tendency to die much too easy for my liking which is why I stay around the 10 volt or under range.

Clones are much better in that department but tend to have higher noise factors on signals.

Under windows it wont be COM 1 (thats windows default port) so double check its not listed elsewhere in device manager.

I would love to see Arduino have some trusted RDP experts to be able to fix some of these things as its often something quite simple.
Thank you so much for your persistence in helping me figure this out, Ballscrewbob2. I really appreciate it.

I think you're right that it's an issue with the wrong port being selected. Currently, the Arduino IDE has it set to COM1, the windows default port. I just had another look at the listing under Device Manager, but I really don't see my Arduino Uno device listed. I'd hoped that reinstalling the drivers would resolve this, but no such luck.

Do you have any suggestions for other things I can try? Most of the solutions I've Googled online say to reinstall the drivers, but there must be some other issue since that hasn't worked so far.



Is it your first time you work with this board ?
If so, it might be drivers issue.
If it was working with you, it might be cable issue or something on the board blown up.
Hey Arduino_Beginner. Yep! First time working with this board. I am also under the impression that it's a driver issue. The on-board LED is lighting up properly when I plug it in, so I assume the issue isn't that the board blew up or that there's a cable issue. I'm completely new to this, so perhaps I'm wrong. Is there a good way of identifying that a board is "blown up"?

MrComputerIlliterate

A small update: I tried following the instructions provided in this Q&A, got my hopes up, and then got a "code 10" error. I've spent hours trying to just get this thing running and am starting to get pretty bummed out about the whole thing.  :(  I'm out of ideas to try.


MrComputerIlliterate

Another update: I uninstalled the latest version of the Arduino IDE and installed Arduino 1.0. The good news is that a new device showed up on my Device Manager listing as COM3 under "Other devices," and has a yellow box with an exclamation point. I right-clicked it, selected "Update Driver Software," chose  "Browse my computer for driver software," and then selected the Arduino 1.0 drivers file. Then I got a message saying "Windows encountered a problem installing the driver software for your device. Windows found driver software for your device but encountered an error while attempting to install it. Communications port. The third-party INF does not contain digital signature information."

Under Device Manager, it is now listed as "Unknown device" instead of COM3. Meanwhile, when I open the Arduino 1.0 IDE, tools>serial port still only lists the COM1 windows default port, without the option of selecting anything else.

MrComputerIlliterate

I am going to continue updating with the hopes of eventually figuring this out and potentially saving some future Google-savvy person a lot of trouble should they have the same problem and happen to stumble onto this forum post.

Given the odd issue with the device not updating, I decided to reinstall Arduino 1.8.3. The device was finally recognized and was updated fully, and is now listed under Ports (COM & LPT) as "Arduino Uno (COM4)". Progress! Unfortunately, the Arduino IDE is still stuck on the COM1 default and won't let me select my device.

If anyone has any suggestions, I'd love to hear 'em. It seems that I am getting close to being able to use my Arduino (finally!!!) I have to head off to work, but I'll fiddle around with it some more when I get home and post any updates should I make any more progress with this bloody device. :)

Ballscrewbob2

Code 10 is almost always a driver issue.
Maybe you have "driver signing" enabled. You could google that quite easily and rectify that pretty quickly before trying to install or re-install any more drivers.

Maybe the bootloader is corrupt or the 16u2 is pooched ?
If you have another Arduino you can use as an ISP that too may well be worth a shot.
But so long as windows cannot see the Arduino then there isnt much that can be done.

It may not be the answer you were looking for but its the one I am giving based on either experience, educated guess, google or the fact that you gave nothing to go with in the first place so I used my wonky crystal ball.

MrComputerIlliterate

Code 10 is almost always a driver issue.
Maybe you have "driver signing" enabled. You could google that quite easily and rectify that pretty quickly before trying to install or re-install any more drivers.

Maybe the bootloader is corrupt or the 16u2 is pooched ?
If you have another Arduino you can use as an ISP that too may well be worth a shot.
But so long as windows cannot see the Arduino then there isnt much that can be done.


It's working!!!!! Thank you for your diligence, Ballscrewbob2!


So, I decided to uninstall everything (again). Then I went to PC Settings>Advanced Startup>Restart now. From there, I clicked through Troubleshoot>Advanced>Startup settings>Disable driver signature enforcement. After reinstalling Arduino 1.0, I plugged in my Arduino Uno and the device was finally recognized! From there, I just had to go into Device Manager, right click the "unknown device" listed under "Other devices," then selected  "Browse my computer for driver software" followed by "arduino-1.0-windows\arduino-1.0\drivers". The serial port setting in the Arduino IDE then defaulted to COM6, I tried uploading a sketch, and voila! It finally works!

Frustrating as this was, it's also hugely rewarding having this thing up and running after so much trial and error. I suppose I better get used to lengthy periods of troubleshooting if I'm going to become more computer savvy, huh? Hopefully it's smooth sailing for a bit though... I'm excited to start playing around with my new board. :)

Again, thank you for all your help! I really appreciate it.

Ballscrewbob2

You are most welcome and most of the users around here are just as helpful if not more.
Some very very clever people in here. (Much more so then me)
It may not be the answer you were looking for but its the one I am giving based on either experience, educated guess, google or the fact that you gave nothing to go with in the first place so I used my wonky crystal ball.

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