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Topic: New State machine tutorial (Read 18821 times) previous topic - next topic

GoForSmoke

Someone new to the state machine concept are not necessarily new to programming. This tutorial is not about C++. It is about implanting a state machine in Arduino's environment which happens to be written in C++.

I my mind, using a "switch" construct is not easier than using enum, since I have met on this site, a few persons that only uses "if" constructs, "since you can to everything with that construct" and won't have anything to do with "switch". But I insist in using it because the "switch" construct is , IMHO, ideal to describe a state machine's behaviour.

A switch-case state machine is a good way to break a large or long top-down process into small pieces and wait intervals. A function with a state machine can achieve a whole process by running over and over. Your void loop() may run > 60 times a millisecond, over and over can get somewhere fast at that rate.

I have a demo showing how to use switch-case to remove calls to delay(). It hit me while I was de-blocking a greenhouse automation with a lot of wait-for's that one come-back-later code before the switch could replace any number of cases with timing code (the original GSM code had 10 delays).

Code: [Select]

// add-a-sketch_un-delay 2018 by GoForSmoke @ Arduino.cc Forum
// Free for use, Apr 30/18 by GFS. Compiled on Arduino IDE 1.6.9.
// This sketch shows a general method to get rid of delays in code.
// You could upgrade code with delays to work with add-a-sketch.

#include <avr/io.h>
#include "Arduino.h"

const byte ledPin = 13;
unsigned long delayStart, delayWait;

void setup()
{
  Serial.begin( 115200 );
  Serial.println( F( "\n\n\n  Un-Delay Example, free by GoForSmoke\n" ));
  Serial.println( F( "This sketch shows how to get rid of delays in code.\n" ));

  pinMode( ledPin, OUTPUT );
};


/* The section of the original sketch with delays:
 *
 * digitalWrite( ledPin, HIGH );   --  0
 * delay( 500 );
 * digitalWrite( ledPin, LOW );    --  1
 * delay( 250 );
 * digitalWrite( ledPin, HIGH );   --  2
 * delay( 250 );
 * digitalWrite( ledPin, LOW );    --  3
 * delay( 250 );
 * digitalWrite( ledPin, HIGH );   --  4
 * delay( 1000 );
 * digitalWrite( ledPin, LOW );    --  5
 * delay( 1000 );
 */

byte blinkStep; // state tracking for BlinkPattern() below

void BlinkPattern()
{
  // This one-shot timer replaces every delay() removed in one spot. 
  // start of one-shot timer
  if ( delayWait > 0 ) // one-shot timer only runs when set
  {
    if ( millis() - delayStart < delayWait )
    {
      return; // instead of blocking, the undelayed function returns
    }
    else
    {
      delayWait = 0; // time's up! turn off the timer and run the blinkStep case
    }
  }
  // end of one-shot timer

  // here each case has a timed wait but cases could change Step on pin or serial events.
  switch( blinkStep )  // runs the case numbered in blinkStep
  {
    case 0 :
    digitalWrite( ledPin, HIGH );
    Serial.println( F( "Case 0 doing something unspecified here at " ));
    Serial.println( delayStart = millis()); // able to set a var to a value I pass to function
    delayWait = 500; // for the next half second, this function will return on entry.
    blinkStep = 1;   // when the switch-case runs again it will be case 1 that runs
    break; // exit switch-case

    case 1 :
    digitalWrite( ledPin, LOW );
    Serial.println( F( "Case 1 doing something unspecified here at " ));
    Serial.println( delayStart = millis());
    delayWait = 250;
    blinkStep = 2;
    break;

    case 2 :
    digitalWrite( ledPin, HIGH );
    Serial.println( F( "Case 2 doing something unspecified here at " ));
    Serial.println( delayStart = millis());
    delayWait = 250;
    blinkStep = 3;
    break;

    case 3 :
    digitalWrite( ledPin, LOW );
    Serial.println( F( "Case 3 doing something unspecified here at " ));
    Serial.println( delayStart = millis());
    delayWait = 250;
    blinkStep = 4;
    break;

    case 4 :
    digitalWrite( ledPin, HIGH );
    Serial.println( F( "Case 4 doing something unspecified here at " ));
    Serial.println( delayStart = millis());
    delayWait = 1000;
    blinkStep = 5;
    break;

    case 5 :
    digitalWrite( ledPin, LOW );
    Serial.print( F( "Case 5 doing something unspecified here at " ));
    Serial.println( delayStart = millis());
    delayWait = 1000;
    blinkStep = 0;
    break;
  }
}


void loop()  // runs over and over, see how often
{           
  BlinkPattern();
}


A full state machine tutorial would show a state machine embedded in a state machine to handle delays indented to the ones you just replaced.
   
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink  <-- tasking Arduino 1-2-3
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial <-- techniques howto
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts
Your sketch can sense ongoing process events in time.
Your sketch can make events to control it over time.

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