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Topic: Oscilloscope (Read 2707 times) previous topic - next topic

jackmanjls

I'm looking for an inexpensive 2-ch oscope that would be sufficient for arduino development.

Any suggestions?

Southpark

I'm looking for an inexpensive 2-ch oscope that would be sufficient for arduino development.

Any suggestions?
Price range? Expensive for some might be inexpensive for some (and vice versa).

CrossRoads

USB scope or a standalone unit?
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

groundFungus

#3
Nov 24, 2017, 12:44 am Last Edit: Nov 24, 2017, 12:55 am by groundFungus
Not an oscilloscope but there are the clone 8 bit logic analyser.  Nearly as useful (for Arduino stuff) and inexpensive.   Use with the Pulseview software from sigrok.org.

larryd

#4
Nov 24, 2017, 12:58 am Last Edit: Nov 24, 2017, 04:21 am by larryd
I'm looking for an inexpensive 2-ch oscope that would be sufficient for arduino development.

Any suggestions?
What is your budget?

If it's only for Arduino, all you need is a logic probe (LED with resistor maybe) and a DVM.

.
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MorganS

A standalone scope used to be very expensive (for a hobby budget.) Now you can get something quite good for the same cost as an expensive soldering iron. You really don't need much more than the bottom of the range, cheapest scope. You don't need to measure GHz on any Arduino project.

I would definitely look for a "mixed signal" one though. Something which has both analog and logic inputs. Then you can put one important analog signal on the analog channel and see a good amount of digital data on the same screen.

I don't like USB-based scopes. Most of the inexpensive ones have extremely limited voltage inputs. You can't measure your 12V power supply directly and that's a job I always need to do, to check the sag on my voltage input before troubleshooting the rest of the circuit. Even if you buy an expensive one, then you really need a second monitor, so you don't have to juggle the Serial Monitor and your Arduino code on the same screen.
"The problem is in the code you didn't post."

cmiyc

#6
Nov 24, 2017, 04:53 am Last Edit: Nov 24, 2017, 04:54 am by cmiyc
You need to decide on a budget, then if you want go to standalone or tethered (USB, Bluetooth, or WiFi.)

I recently reviewed the 2-channel 10MHz PicoScope. It's the first USB-based scope I liked. It's $140USD and includes a basic arbitrary waveform generator. The software's feature set is on-par with scopes that cost thousands of dollars.

Here's my full review on it: https://www.element14.com/community/roadTestReviews/2530/l/picoscope-2204a-usb-oscilloscope-review

If you want standalone, I'd recommend a 50MHz Rigol. You'll be spending in the $350 range. They have decent specs and a reasonable feature set.
Capacitor Expert By Day, Enginerd by night.  ||  Personal Blog: www.baldengineer.com  || Electronics Tutorials for Beginners:  www.addohms.com

6v6gt

I am only an occasional user so I bought one of these $49 USB oscilloscopes.

For hobby use, these are OK. I have also done some things that I could not do with a logic analyser like checking the output of an OPamp for clipping in a signal processing application and working out why a mosfet was getting hot in a Nixie power supply.

Of course, these are limited. The voltage range has been mentioned so you'd need an external voltage divider if you go over 5 volts. The recording/playback function is also poor where only odd snatches of the signal get recorded. Also , I am not sure what happens if there is a new release of Windows (currently Windows 10).

You can also check out online reviews (Youtube) to get other opinions.

pi_and_chips

I purchased my scope about a year ago. It was what I would call cheap when compared with top quality lab equipment. I didn't want something too simple nor overly complicated. But I did want features I could "grow" into using later on without having to spend out again on upgrading.

So I went with the Hantek DSO5102 which has more than enough in it for my needs. They can be had for around £200 these days but were a tad more expensive when I got mine.

I didn't think I'd use my scope as much as I do or use half the features it has but since I've had it, it has been invaluable to me. It has made debugging my circuits a lot easier and because I've got a scope with all these neat features, I am pushing my learning a lot more to make use of them.

Sure it's probably under-used in terms of the features I've not yet explored but the scope allows me room to progress into them and I wouldn't be without my scope now. My Hantek has never let me down and in just over a year has proven to be reliable and as accurate as I could hope it to be. I look after it like its one of my children lol

All I need now to complete my lab to satisfaction is a Spectrum Analyser and a Network Analyser and I'm all set for anything and everything I'm likely to find myself experimenting with.



tibtib

#9
Nov 25, 2017, 06:43 pm Last Edit: Nov 25, 2017, 06:53 pm by tibtib
This company has (free) software that  looks interesting but I have not had a chance to try it yet so ymmv.

https://ar-oscilloscope.com

When I have time, I plan to install  it on an android phone which I recently retired from active service. If someone here has already tried that software I would like to know how well it is able to monitor and decode SPI and I2C protocols.

<edit> you don't have to buy  their hardware; it uses the earphone/mic connector - connect to  ground and mic input using an appropriate series resistor

DVDdoug

I use an oscilloscope at work, but so far I've gotten-by without one at home.   (I have brought one or two home-projects into work a couple of times to use the 'scope.)

If I were buying one, I'd buy a "real" benchtop oscilloscope capable of at least 20MHz (for the Arduino clock).   That would cost a few hundred dollars.  There are too many limitations to a little gadget that connects to the computer, and you've got to connect it to the computer, start & configure the software etc.   It's "nice" if the computer can connect to the computer too, but I want it to work by itself.   (Our Tektronix 'scopes at work don't have a computer interface, but some  have a floppy drive, and the other a socket for a thumb drive so I can capture images.)  

Typically, I'll use the 'scope at work to check for the presence of a clock (or sometimes to check the frequency) or to check data lines, address lines, chip enable lines, etc.    You can't tell a lot from looking at address/data lines, but you can usually tell if you have an open or short or "no data", etc.   Typically, I'm just looking for signal or no-signal, or high/low.

larryd

#11
Nov 26, 2017, 12:35 am Last Edit: Nov 26, 2017, 12:35 am by larryd
"floppy drive"  ???
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sprinkfitter

I am a newbe when it comes to this field. I wanted to by an oscilloscope to learn how to use it in my little projects.  I was hoping to pick up a use one but all the people having descent scope wanted a buch of money. 250 -500 bucks and who knows if they work or how long they will work. Now that's my story and I am sticking to it.  So I told Mommy that Amazon had a deal on a Siglent Technologies SDS1202X-E 200 mhz Digital Oscilloscope.  Suppose to get it Monday!!!  I was told it was a good newbe Oscilloscope.  A little bit more than I wanted to spend but did I say it was coming Monday.   :)  :)  :)  :)  :)  :)

Sprinkfitter

dougp

If the logic analyzer intrigues you, Ralph Bacon has YT demo video.
I don't trust atoms.  They make up everything.

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pi_and_chips

I am a newbe when it comes to this field. I wanted to by an oscilloscope to learn how to use it in my little projects.  I was hoping to pick up a use one but all the people having descent scope wanted a buch of money. 250 -500 bucks and who knows if they work or how long they will work. Now that's my story and I am sticking to it.  So I told Mommy that Amazon had a deal on a Siglent Technologies SDS1202X-E 200 mhz Digital Oscilloscope.  Suppose to get it Monday!!!  I was told it was a good newbe Oscilloscope.  A little bit more than I wanted to spend but did I say it was coming Monday.   :)  :)  :)  :)  :)  :)

Sprinkfitter
The SDS1202X-E sure is a fine looking and sounding scope and 200Mhz is a great amount of bandwidth.

I think the SDS1202X-E is a tad bit more (maybe £50 - £60) expensive than my Hantek was when it was new about a year or so ago - BUT with the SDS1202 you're getting DOUBLE the bandwidth for your money which is what I would have done if it was around at the time I was looking for a starter scope.

I do a great deal of experiments with VHF Amateur Radio and a 200Mhz scope would natively put me right in the frequency ranges I mainly work with... 140 - 160Mhz.

I am sure you will be very very happy with your SDS1202 when it arrives and if you're like me, you will be making any excuse you can just to use it - even when a simple test meter will do. hehe.

When I ordered my scope last year, I can remember counting the days until it arrived and I spent as much time as I could watching YouTube videos about how it worked, what it could do, how to do it - which of course heightened the anticipation of it finally arriving on my doorstep. And when it finally did arrive, I wasn't disappointed.

One of the best (and worst) buttons on my scope is Auto Set... It gets me out of trouble when I screw up but it shouldn't be relied on as a go to for all button. It's best to learn how to use the features and measurements manually - but none the less, it is a very helpful button.


I hope your scope brings you as much pleasure and reliable service as mine has.


Happy Probing!!! ;) :)





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