Go Down

Topic: Opinions on 'Candle' color LEDs? (Read 2112 times) previous topic - next topic

PeterPan321

Having designed what I humbly believe is a very good candle flame simulation class, I wonder if anyone else who has tried to mimic candles has run into the difficulty of finding a good "warm white" LED color for this use. I've gotten good results (to my eyes anyway) just using small clear (non colored) incandescent Lamps from Holiday light sets. But of course LEDs would be better for power considerations.

So... it seems to me that among the store bought LED bulbs for home lighting use, the color designated "Soft White" seems to come closest to a Candle. So I'm tempted to take one apart and see if I can separate the internal LEDs. I've done some research and found one article describing Candle light as 1900 degrees on the Kelvin scale, and an RGB combination of 255, 147, 41, respectively. 1900 is a bit lower than even "Soft White" LEDs are rated, color wise. But considering the many "electronic candles" I've seen sold who's color looks completely wrong, I don't know if I could trust that figure either.

Anyway, I figure it might be a good time to see if anyone else has discovered a GOOD "of the shelf" warm white LED that does a better job. Or, if anyone has found that rolling their own with an RGB LED, along with appropriate resistor combinations has offered better success.



larryd

No technical PMs.
If you are asked a question, please respond with an answer.
If you are asked for more information, please supply it.
If you need clarification, ask for help.

PeterPan321

Jack Christensen has a good example here:
https://github.com/JChristensen/ledFire_HW   

https://vimeo.com/110424346   


Edit, software.

https://github.com/JChristensen/ledFire_FW   


Thanks for the input. This doesn't really address my questions though. I've already designed a simulation I'm satisfied with, as far as mimicking the expected variations in brightness you'd expect from a burning candle flame. But its the light source I'm looking for advice for, and I could not really see that in the video. Either the inside of the container is painted orange to look like the inside of a pumpkin, or the light source itself is much to orange to resemble the typical light from a candle. but again, the actual light source is not being shown to the camera.

larryd

#3
Dec 26, 2017, 03:15 am Last Edit: Dec 26, 2017, 03:16 am by larryd
He uses amber LEDs.
I have one of these, I added a white LED to the group.




.
No technical PMs.
If you are asked a question, please respond with an answer.
If you are asked for more information, please supply it.
If you need clarification, ask for help.

larryd

No technical PMs.
If you are asked a question, please respond with an answer.
If you are asked for more information, please supply it.
If you need clarification, ask for help.

PeterPan321

He uses amber LEDs.
I have one of these, I added a white LED to the group.




.
Thanks again. Yeah see what I mean... even you decided to add a white LED to the group. Like I said, I have my own code simulation I'm happy with (I'll eventually post it somewhere). But right now I'm just looking to see what single LED sources are available that offer close to candle color. If I were to do as you did, combining multiple LEDs, I might as well just get one RGB LEDs and tweak the exact color I feel matches a candle with trim pots. But I was hoping some manufacturer already made such shade of white LED.

artisticforge

Thanks again. Yeah see what I mean... even you decided to add a white LED to the group. Like I said, I have my own code simulation I'm happy with (I'll eventually post it somewhere). But right now I'm just looking to see what single LED sources are available that offer close to candle color. If I were to do as you did, combining multiple LEDs, I might as well just get one RGB LEDs and tweak the exact color I feel matches a candle with trim pots. But I was hoping some manufacturer already made such shade of white LED.
The answer depends on which type of LED you are looking for.
The through-the-hole two-lead LED gets its color from the plastic.
The through-the-hole four-lead LED is an RGB LED. The Color is a combination of the individual Red, Blue and Green LED.

The majority of Surface-mounted LED are RGB. Whether they are inidividually addressable has to be determined.
There are more Surface-mounted LED which are WRGB. These have an actual White LED along with the Red, Blue and Green LED.

The type of LED you are searching for are used in Wedding and Gala Party lighting.
There are many Chinese manufacturers of this type of LED lighting.

the Softer whites are better than the stark bright White.

You seem to be searching for a yellow hued LED. perhaps even orange hued.

The type of LED you seek may exist. The one place to check is Aliexpress .

I have seen corncob LED lights which mimic the older Halogen Vapor Lights used in Street Light.
These are specialized LED for high output. I have been looking at these to replace the Security Lights around the farmland. The current Mercury Vapor lights emit far much UV. Not good for hUmans nor wildlife.



><>

PeterPan321

The type of LED you are searching for are used in Wedding and Gala Party lighting.
There are many Chinese manufacturers of this type of LED lighting.


Ahh... that's an interesting possibility! I Do know for sure that so far, my own candle simulation looks best with the small incandescent clear "holiday lights". You can see why when you consider that in addition to brightness changes, a lamp filament will change color through several variations that are much like a candle flame, as it goes from dim to bright. 


A close second has been some 12 volt LEDs designed to be a direct replacement for some fixtures that formerly accepted only AC incandescent/halogen lamps. Based on seeing them with my own eyes, and the LONG paragraphs the manufacturer's ads boasting about their research into getting the color right.

Then here's another recent find... Walmart of all places has been selling outdoor Solar powered lamps intended for bordering gardens and such, for 99 cents, and they really do have a very candle-like color even though they are not boasting about it. Since they are solar powered, they are likely highly efficient, and for such a reasonable price, I just might buy up a few to cannibalize. :-)

larryd

Some commercial products are cheaper than the some of there parts too.


.
No technical PMs.
If you are asked a question, please respond with an answer.
If you are asked for more information, please supply it.
If you need clarification, ask for help.

artisticforge

Ahh... that's an interesting possibility! I Do know for sure that so far, my own candle simulation looks best with the small incandescent clear "holiday lights". You can see why when you consider that in addition to brightness changes, a lamp filament will change color through several variations that are much like a candle flame, as it goes from dim to bright. 


A close second has been some 12 volt LEDs designed to be a direct replacement for some fixtures that formerly accepted only AC incandescent/halogen lamps. Based on seeing them with my own eyes, and the LONG paragraphs the manufacturer's ads boasting about their research into getting the color right.

Then here's another recent find... Walmart of all places has been selling outdoor Solar powered lamps intended for bordering gardens and such, for 99 cents, and they really do have a very candle-like color even though they are not boasting about it. Since they are solar powered, they are likely highly efficient, and for such a reasonable price, I just might buy up a few to cannibalize. :-)

I have numerous battery tea lights. they have a small led which "flickers" like a candle flame. some are actually very realistic  you have to get close to see that it is a fake tea light. The fake tea lights are like 25 cents to 50 cents USD.


I personally like actual candles. Christmas sugar cookie is this year's candle. Balsam and clove are a close 2nd.
><>

PaulRB

Christmas sugar cookie is this year's candle. Balsam and clove are a close 2nd.
Those aren't real candles. Any more than "Strongbow Dark Fruits" is real cider.

Scents aside, real candles change their temperature as they flicker. To mimick that, you need at least two colours of LEDs. Warm white and amber or yellow should give a reasonably convincing effect.

artisticforge

Those aren't real candles. Any more than "Strongbow Dark Fruits" is real cider.

Scents aside, real candles change their temperature as they flicker. To mimick that, you need at least two colours of LEDs. Warm white and amber or yellow should give a reasonably convincing effect.
Why do you say that Christmas sugar cookie candle is not a "real" candle?
It is a Yankee Candle Company candle purchased at Bed, Bath & Beyond.

I have no idea what "Strongbow Dark Fruits" is.
Tea-total-er  here.
Morphine and alcohol do not mix well.
Type I diabetic and alcohol also do not do well together.
><>

PaulRB

#12
Jan 01, 2018, 12:08 am Last Edit: Jan 01, 2018, 12:16 am by PaulRB
Just that candles aren't supposed to smell of anything except wax. And cider is not supposed to smell of anything except apples. Anything else they put in is probably there to cover up the fact that the product is poor quality.

Quote
I have no idea what "Strongbow Dark Fruits" is.
You're better off that way!

Happy new year!

runaway_pancake

candles aren't supposed to smell of anything except wax.
"Wax"? How moderne.
Everyone but everyone knows that real candles are made from tallow.
"Who is like unto the beast? who is able to make war with him?"
When all else fails, check your wiring!

Go Up