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Topic: Students getting smarter at cheating? (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

westfw

A couple of posts I've seen recently have me wondering if some students, wanting the internet to do their work for them, have caught on to "the quickest way to get an explanation for something on the internet is not to ask a question, but to post a wrong statement and wait for corrections."

el_supremo

Another approach I have seen is to post in the Exhibition/Gallery section (implying that a project is complete and working) and then either asking for comments or asking for help with one minor bit that doesn't quite work.

Pete
Don't send me technical questions via Private Message.

Robin2

I wonder when these guys will eventually be found out?

With all due respect to people who are genuine experts on history or languages or economics, a lazy student would not do too much harm by being wrong in those fields. But bridges fall down if they are not designed properly, and electronic circuits go on fire.

Maybe they are sensible enough not to look for employment that would actually require the use of their (non-existent) technical knowledge.

Maybe one of them was employed by Samsung a couple of years back :)

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

Robin2

Long story short, i dislike the term "lazy", if the person may have a learning disability.
I have no problem with that.

But people with learning difficulties are definitely a minority and I don't believe it is reasonable to start with the assumption that a question is being asked by such a person.

That would be the equivalent of giving everyone you meet on the street £1 just in case they are poor.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

Robin2

i would think a query as to what the person is trying to do, and why they need to do it would flush out a lot more quality responses .
I think that is the usual response on this Forum.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

Paul_KD7HB

I wonder when these guys will eventually be found out?

With all due respect to people who are genuine experts on history or languages or economics, a lazy student would not do too much harm by being wrong in those fields. But bridges fall down if they are not designed properly, and electronic circuits go on fire.

Maybe they are sensible enough not to look for employment that would actually require the use of their (non-existent) technical knowledge.

Maybe one of them was employed by Samsung a couple of years back :)

...R
My experience is those people eventually have government jobs. In the 1960's a highway bridge actually did fall down due to state engineer designing error.

Paul

Robin2

perhaps, but not always.
Indeed.

To err is human, to forgive is divine.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

Robin2

#7
Jan 07, 2018, 08:59 pm Last Edit: Jan 07, 2018, 08:59 pm by Robin2
i don't question the act of forgiveness, i do however question that i would know how to do so, unselfishly.
Interestingly, forgiveness is an intensely selfish act as the only person who benefits is the person doing the forgiving.

The person who committed the "offence" rarely gives a sh*t one way or the other.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

Qdeathstar

Quote
forgiveness is an intensely selfish act as the only person who benefits is the person doing the forgiving.
quotable.
A creaking creeping shadow
stiff against the freezing fog
glares at a tickless watch.

Time has failed him -- all things shall pass.

Robin2

Quote
forgiveness is an intensely selfish act as the only person who benefits is the person doing the forgiving.
quotable.
When I see it presented out of context like that it does not seem to convey the meaning I intended. I was trying to say
Forgiveness is a great benefit to the person doing the forgiving

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

linhkiendtdd

I think when they use internet more. They become depend on internet much more. Their brand won't have to think anymore. It will be stagnation. So they maybe know much more but they won't get smarter.

msssltd

#11
Jan 08, 2018, 12:48 pm Last Edit: Jan 08, 2018, 12:49 pm by msssltd
I wonder when these guys will eventually be found out?

With all due respect to people who are genuine experts on history or languages or economics, a lazy student would not do too much harm by being wrong in those fields. But bridges fall down if they are not designed properly, and electronic circuits go on fire.
:sigh

Those who think the educational establishments peaked in the 1950s with wrote learning, might not like this, however.  Things have moved on. 

The internet has been around for over a generation now.  Kids are taught to use it as a resource.  Teachers are well aware of the possibilities.  Any decent teacher will be aware of which of their pupils are handing in work which is beyond them.  They [teachers] should also be aware that 'cheating' is all a part of growing up, during adolescence especially. 

Maybe you never cheated as a child, but you will have done something equally anti-social.  Being selfish is a phase of growing up, like putting stuff in your mouth is a phase of growing up.  We all go through it, one way or another.  'They' may never be found out, as 'they,' the majority, grow out of it and develop a fair sense of empathy by ~25 years old.

Quote
Maybe they are sensible enough not to look for employment that would actually require the use of their (non-existent) technical knowledge.
Maybe 'they' are sensible enough to avoid making gross assumptions about people's character and intelligence  based on internet forum posts.

How did you learn to code anyhow Robin?  I used to copy other people's code out of magazines.  Put another way, I studied examples of code which was right, rather than by by staring indeterminately at what I had gotten wrong.  Look beyond the 1950s punitive education system and there are much better teaching methods.  Open learning and the flipped classroom are particularly effective when it comes to teaching kids to code.


Robin2

How did you learn to code anyhow Robin?  I used to copy other people's code out of magazines
Much the same for me.

I think you have taken my comments a great deal more seriously than I intended them to be taken. This is the Bar Sport section.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

ardly

A couple of posts I've seen recently have me wondering if some students, wanting the internet to do their work for them, have caught on to "the quickest way to get an explanation for something on the internet is not to ask a question, but to post a wrong statement and wait for corrections."

I sometimes wonder if there is another technique which is to make almost unbelievably "apple pie" posts. While I always give people the benefit of the doubt I sometimes wonder if the poster is laying it on thick to be sure of a response or perhaps even having a laugh by seeing what people will swallow. Maybe I am just being cynical.
"Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored" - Aldous Huxley

msssltd

I think you have taken my comments a great deal more seriously than I intended them to be taken.
I don't doubt it.  Hopefully you won't take my comments personally.  After all, this is the Bar Sport section.

BTW.  "Forgiveness is an act of revenge(!)"

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