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Topic: Smoke out of motor shield when using a optocoupler (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

TonyWilk

A suggestion.
Find some old discarded PCB and practice soldering.

The pref board looks rough.
Yes, I think so too. Some parts were for me really difficult to solder.
Good advice there re: soldering

Perf board can often be difficult to solder (especially if it's been sat on the shelf a while) - consider investing in some liquid reworking flux, just a tiny amount wiped on can make it so much easier. like:  Liquid Soldering Flux

Yours,
  TonyWilk

artisticforge

Thanks for the suggestions!

I probably will have to do this. Learning to solder properly will take quite some time? I think it may be easier to keep my motivation up by doing real projects... perhaps the easier solution for now is to find perfboards that are easier to solder.

<snip>

I use very thin solder. The solder I use is perhaps the width of 2 human hairs.
When soldering perf board I use a fine point soldering tip.
My soldering station has temperature control I can dial in the temperature.

Use the least amount of solder that you possibly can.

use solder flux when un soldering parts.
a good vacuum solder sucker is necessary
use solder wick if you do not have a solder sucker.

><>

TomGeorge

Hi,
I know I'll get some reaction to this BUT;
[soapbox]
Try and get lead based solder, rather than lead-free solder.

Lead-free solder works, BUT, the joint whether it is a good joint or bad joint, ALWAYS looks like a bad joint. (I could use stronger language.. :o )

Lead solder works great, it FLOWS easily and is great to learn how to solder, a good joint looks nice and shiny, a bad joint looks bad.

I try to avoid lead-free solder if I can.

If I am fixing dry lead-free joint, if I replace it with lead solder, it makes the rest of the PCB look like every joint is dodgy.

ALL my new PCB construction and prototypes are soldered using Lead - Tin base resin cored solder.
[\soapbox]


My supplier;

https://www.wiltronics.com.au/product/8976/tinlead-solder-56mm-6040-500gm-roll/

Tom... :)
Everything runs on smoke, let the smoke out, it stops running....

TonyWilk

Try and get lead based solder, rather than lead-free solder.
[outrage]

lead ?

LEAD !!!!

OMG! THINK OF THE CHILDREN !!!!

[/outrage]

...sorry

Yeh, I've got tons of the stuff after the factory had to go lead-free, works well  :D

Yours,
  TonyWilk


artisticforge

Hi,
Try and get lead based solder, rather than lead-free solder.

Tom... :)
absolutely NOT!!!

there is enough pollution in the environment without adding more lead.

spend a little more for proper lead-free solder.
practice using lead-free solder.

On larger metal working projects I use silver solder.
I rather have silver solder in the water pipes than lead solder in the water pipes.

I am a firm believer in imposing stiff excise taxes on lead solder.
><>

mikko

Perf board can often be difficult to solder (especially if it's been sat on the shelf a while) - consider investing in some liquid reworking flux, just a tiny amount wiped on can make it so much easier.
Thanks! I'll look into this one too.

mikko

I use very thin solder. The solder I use is perhaps the width of 2 human hairs.
The one I use is 0,8mm. I now browsed our local component store, and they stock 0,38mm. The thinnest I found online was 0,3mm. What is the size of the one you are using? Are you ordering it online?

Quote
When soldering perf board I use a fine point soldering tip.
I have this solder,

http://www.mpja.com/Mini-Solder-Station-ZD-99/productinfo/15860+TL/

it was recommended by somebody for this kind of work when I started few years ago.  (Had a break after initial bad experiences of soldering.) It seems to have a 1/32" tip, which is 0,8mm. It seems this model does not have finer replacement tips available.

What would be fine point tip? It seems Weller has 0,25mm tips.

Quote
My soldering station has temperature control I can dial in the temperature.
Mine has temperature control too, but I find it difficult to find what would be the exact temperature I should use. Now it is set to approx 325'C. This seems high for me, but with lower it seems that the tin is not liquidifying.

Quote
Use the least amount of solder that you possibly can.
Here I guess some practice will help...

Quote
use solder flux when un soldering parts.
a good vacuum solder sucker is necessary
use solder wick if you do not have a solder sucker.
Flux I have not used, will have to look into that. I have both wick and a sucker. I don't know if my sucker is good or not. Here practice will probably also help. It seems that using the solder to liquidify and then using the sucker at the same time is not very easy to do. It seems I am missing hands. (Sure, I have helping hands. Maybe my real problem is working lights). Applies for wicking too.

artisticforge

The one I use is 0,8mm. I now browsed our local component store, and they stock 0,38mm. The thinnest I found online was 0,3mm. What is the size of the one you are using? Are you ordering it online?

I have this solder,

http://www.mpja.com/Mini-Solder-Station-ZD-99/productinfo/15860+TL/

it was recommended by somebody for this kind of work when I started few years ago.  (Had a break after initial bad experiences of soldering.) It seems to have a 1/32" tip, which is 0,8mm. It seems this model does not have finer replacement tips available.

What would be fine point tip? It seems Weller has 0,25mm tips.

Mine has temperature control too, but I find it difficult to find what would be the exact temperature I should use. Now it is set to approx 325'C. This seems high for me, but with lower it seems that the tin is not liquidifying.

Here I guess some practice will help...

Flux I have not used, will have to look into that. I have both wick and a sucker. I don't know if my sucker is good or not. Here practice will probably also help. It seems that using the solder to liquidify and then using the sucker at the same time is not very easy to do. It seems I am missing hands. (Sure, I have helping hands. Maybe my real problem is working lights). Applies for wicking too.
I use this solder.
Mudder 0.3 mm Lead Free Solder Wire Sn99 Ag0.3 Cu0.7 with Rosin Core for Electrical Soldering
I have a spool of thinner Lead Free Solder but the label has fallen off. it is the same alloy.
Sn99 Ag0.3 Cu0.7
I had a friend who was jeweler and he would give me his remnants of jeweler solder and silver solder.
He died last year.

this is one of my soldering stations
Aoyue 866 SMD Digital Hot Air Rework Station

This is the other one
Aoyue 968A+ SMD Digital Hot Air Rework Station

I like the flexible arm magnifying glass with the ring of LED around it.

Magnifier Task Lamp with 3 Diopter Glass Lens
><>

TonyWilk

I use 0.8mm solder for quite a lot of things (I do repair older electronics) and 0.46mm for newer projects - that's only for thru-hole. For surface-mount it's always paste from a syringe.

Personally, I don't think I could work with anything thinner than 0.46mm - but it really is a preference and 'preferred technique' sort of thing.

I've seen guys using really thin solder and they seem to do a 'heat it up and feeeeed it in', whereas I think I'm a 'heat it up and dab some on' kinda guy.  Has sort-of-parallels to MIG vs. TIG if you've done some welding.

Yours,
  TonyWilk
 

TomGeorge

I use 0.8mm solder for quite a lot of things (I do repair older electronics) and 0.46mm for newer projects - that's only for thru-hole. For surface-mount it's always paste from a syringe.

Personally, I don't think I could work with anything thinner than 0.46mm - but it really is a preference and 'preferred technique' sort of thing.

I've seen guys using really thin solder and they seem to do a 'heat it up and feeeeed it in', whereas I think I'm a 'heat it up and dab some on' kinda guy.  Has sort-of-parallels to MIG vs. TIG if you've done some welding.

Yours,
  TonyWilk
 
The thinner stuff is the way to go, feeeding in solder gives you great control.
I use 0.7 or 0.5, usually 0.7 for general PCB, 0.5 for SMD.
With thinner stuff you don't need a large soldering iron, as the thin solder does not sink way heat as it melts.
If you are using vero / strip board, straight out of its bag I clean it in Isopropyl.
If it doesn't look nice and shiny, a Brillo pad or steel wool quickly removes the tarnish.
Tom... :)
Everything runs on smoke, let the smoke out, it stops running....

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