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Topic: pulse width / period measurment with offset (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

wvmarle

WVmarle I PMed please keep any further discussion on this thread to the topic. Anybody that wants to ask me questions about the other aspects feel free to pm me.
Discussion of a scientific principle a project is based upon is on topic, as it is paramount to the design of the software. Without understanding a system you want to control, there is no chance of controlling it. So that's why the discussion belongs in the forum.

You still haven't provided any references to where to look for these principles. You just say "look into it", but obviously can't answer the question "where?". If you think I'm wrong there, please show me where to look.
Quality of answers is related to the quality of questions. Good questions will get good answers. Useless answers are a sign of a poor question.

country4life89

I have showed you where to look but because its not in a paper somewhere you literally act like i didn't say anything.



READ THIS PLEASE WV MARLE
explain to me with physics how the transformer i have mention MANY MANY times would light a light with zero current!

wvmarle

READ THIS PLEASE WV MARLE
explain to me with physics how the transformer i have mention MANY MANY times would light a light with zero current!
Without clear explanation on this one (such as circuit diagrams, schematics, and other details) sorry, I can't explain it either way. You didn't even provide sufficient information to try and build it (did you try to build it yourself? At least no super precise timing needed).
Quality of answers is related to the quality of questions. Good questions will get good answers. Useless answers are a sign of a poor question.

country4life89

yes i built it MYSELF. it takes five components.

2 12 volt light bulbs two capacitors ONE 1:1 transformer.

you can use a variable capacitor or you can snip bits of wire off the secondary one peice at a time. but once you have a resistive capacitive tank ciruit on both sides of a 1;1 transformer tuned to the same resonant frequency. when you reach that frequency on the primary the light bulb will stop glowing on that side and will get bright on the secondary. AS PER PHYSICS which you claim to know. when at the true resonant frequency you are supplying  NO power to the circuit. BUT the light bulb on the secondary will light up.

TomGeorge

yes i built it MYSELF. it takes five components.

2 12 volt light bulbs two capacitors ONE 1:1 transformer.

you can use a variable capacitor or you can snip bits of wire off the secondary one peice at a time. but once you have a resistive capacitive tank ciruit on both sides of a 1;1 transformer tuned to the same resonant frequency. when you reach that frequency on the primary the light bulb will stop glowing on that side and will get bright on the secondary. AS PER PHYSICS which you claim to know. when at the true resonant frequency you are supplying  NO power to the circuit. BUT the light bulb on the secondary will light up.
Hi, can you draw a circuit please?
Thanks.. Tom.. :)
Everything runs on smoke, let the smoke out, it stops running....

Robin2

If it goes through a Faraday cage your hat won't work!

If by that you are judging me as some whackjob because I am trying to study "known science" that could one day stop you from having to pay for gas in your car or an electric bill for your house
I have no intention of calling another person names. But I am happy to say that it is a "whackjob" idea.

Ask yourself this question "If I devote my life to this and discover, when I am 80 years old that I am no closer to getting it to work than I was when I was young, would I prefer to have devoted my time to something else?"

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

country4life89

http://johnbedini.net/john34/bedinibearden.html


Robin. Ask YOURSELF this. If I have already seen proof way before wasting my life then why would I waste my time trying to PROVE it to people that will not get out of there chair and go put a circuit together and see it.

Qdeathstar

#37
Mar 09, 2018, 02:04 pm Last Edit: Mar 09, 2018, 02:05 pm by Qdeathstar
The truth is out there. This works. An obama era conspiracy reaching the highest level of the government has obscured this fact: free energy is real. However, you cannot do this with an arduino, you need a raspberry pi. PM me for details.
A creaking creeping shadow
stiff against the freezing fog
glares at a tickless watch.

Time has failed him -- all things shall pass.

country4life89

Tom, yes I will upload a circuit. Give me an hour or so to get done with my morning routine and I will draw a circuit for you and post it. When I attached the diagram before it did not display it only showed a file. How did you make it display?

GrooveFlotilla

Quote
I have an IQ of 147
Quote
How did you make it display?
Some people are like Slinkies.

Not really good for anything, but they bring a smile to your face when pushed down the stairs.

country4life89

Some of you people are ridiculously judgmental. Just because I do not know a certain aspect of this particular website! On any other forum that I use when you upload the picture it displays the picture not just a file. So me asking a question so that the next file I upload can be actually displayed instead of someone else having to do it for me is a bad thing?

country4life89

Here is the circuit. The tank circuit in the left is the primary. When not in resonance the lamp #1 will glow giving a visual representation of the ac current coming from the ac source. When in resonance the lamp #1 will not be lit because it is understood that a " perfect" resonant circuit will have zero current flowing from the source. In reality it's is very hard to get to absolutely zero but microamps is all that will flow from the source into the resonating primary tank.

When the secondary is tuned to have the exact same resonant frequency as the primary....and the primary is resonating at that frequency....then point 1- such a small amount of current is flowing from the source to the primary tank that the light #1 will not be lit. Point 2- when that is happening the resonance in the secondary side will be resonating and will have enough current to light lamp #2.

country4life89

circuit simulation

the above simulation is a demonstration of how a resonant tank circuit can have more energy flowing "in the tank" than is supplied by the source.

country4life89

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N70zVhC9jZ4

here is a video demonstrating the effect however there is no description of the circuit used but it is the same effect. when the capacitor is attached the current on the input goes lower until the light is barely lit while the output gets brighter.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R2y9w9cbwcg

Here is a video showing just a resonant tank circuit and how at resonance the current drops and the output rises. This is a KNOWN fact. the problem people have is when you try to have a variable "changing" load or "add" a resistive load to the output it changes the resonant value of the output negating the effect. But if you purposely build the output "with load" to resonate at the right frequency you will have more energy flowing in the secondary than you are supplying in the primary

country4life89

I have come up with two code options as a "base" for working out the rest. I made one with separate ISR's for rising and falling. Then I made one with one ISR thinking it would be better. what strikes me as odd is the sketch with one ISR takes more bytes in the arduino memory.

Code: [Select]
volatile unsigned long rise1 = 0;
volatile unsigned long fall = 0;
volatile unsigned long rise2 = 0;
volatile boolean newrise = false;
volatile boolean newfall = false;
unsigned int Pperiod = 0;
unsigned int Pwidth = 0;

void setup() {
  attachInterrupt(digitalPinToInterrupt(19), ISRchange, CHANGE);
}

void loop() {
  if (newrise == true){
  Pperiod = (rise2 - rise1);
  newrise = false;}

  if (newfall == true){
  Pwidth = (fall - rise2);
  rise1 = rise2;
  newfall = false;}
 

 
}
void ISRchange() {
  if (digitalRead(19) == HIGH){
    rise2 = micros();
    newrise = true;
  }
  else{
    fall = micros();
    newfall = true;
  }
}



I also feel that the sketch (below) with two ISR's would actually be more accurate anyways because setting micros is the first step after the ISR is triggered. With one ISR (above) after it is triggered the state would be read and then the values set. Am I correct in my thinking on this?

Code: [Select]
volatile unsigned long rise1 = 0;
volatile unsigned long fall = 0;
volatile unsigned long rise2 = 0;
volatile boolean newrise = false;
volatile boolean newfall = false;
unsigned int Pperiod = 0;
unsigned int Pwidth = 0;

void setup() {
  attachInterrupt(digitalPinToInterrupt(19), ISRrise, RISING);
  attachInterrupt(digitalPinToInterrupt(19), ISRfall, FALLING);
}

void loop() {
  if (newrise == true){
  Pperiod = (rise2 - rise1);
  newrise = false;}

  if (newfall == true){
  Pwidth = (fall - rise2);
  rise1 = rise2;
  newfall = false;}
 

 
}
void ISRrise() {
    rise2 = micros();
    newrise = true;
}
void ISRfall() {
    fall = micros();
    newfall = true;
}

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