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Topic: Aircraft panel circular connector (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

Cat107

May 08, 2018, 03:00 pm Last Edit: May 08, 2018, 03:34 pm by Cat107
Hello,
I bought a DC-10 smoke control panel(Part manufacturer: Whittaker, Part number: 7948-02) and it has 55-pin circular connector with this signs: CINCH NULINE B MS2426R22B55PN and 883501 further down. I want to get access to all this lamps and switches using arduino, but I don't know what is the simplest and the cheapest way to connect to it. Maybe you can figure out some way to connect to this circular connector or maybe through that green serial-like connector on photos. Here are some images:

Front



Back



Part name plate



Connector







Second end of connector(connected to panel)


Paul_KD7HB

The obvious answer is to buy the mating connector and use it, but that seems to not be an option for you. Are you wanting to used the whole panel in an aircraft or what?

The other obvious answer is to just cut the wires and remove the connector and connect to directly to the wires.

You do know the lights are either 12 volt or 24 volt. If from a commercial aircraft, probably 24 volt.

Paul

Cat107

#2
May 08, 2018, 08:47 pm Last Edit: May 08, 2018, 08:49 pm by Cat107
The obvious answer is to buy the mating connector and use it, but that seems to not be an option for you. Are you wanting to used the whole panel in an aircraft or what?

The other obvious answer is to just cut the wires and remove the connector and connect to directly to the wires.

You do know the lights are either 12 volt or 24 volt. If from a commercial aircraft, probably 24 volt.

Paul
Hi, thanks for response, I want to use it as a clock with alarm in my house (not in real plane), display time using those lights and set things using switches. I don't know what is the voltage for those lights, but the whole panel is from FedEx DC-10 plane. I also was thinking about direct connection, but I don't know how to figure out what thing is each pin responisble for. I know I can just experiment, but it would be hard and maybe dangerous for panel, especially because I don't know what voltage it needs. Do you have any tips?

Paul_KD7HB

Hi, thanks for response, I want to use it as a clock with alarm in my house (not in real plane), display time using those lights and set things using switches. I don't know what is the voltage for those lights, but the whole panel is from FedEx DC-10 plane. I also was thinking about direct connection, but I don't know how to figure out what thing is each pin responisble for. I know I can just experiment, but it would be hard and maybe dangerous for panel, especially because I don't know what voltage it needs. Do you have any tips?
DC-10, would be 24 volts for sure! Pull one of the light bulbs and check out the number written on it.

Check out the connections with an ohm meter. that is what they are for.

Paul

Cat107

I made some reverse engineering and this is an electronic board:

Front



Back



Front panel from behind



There are also spare bulbs in it:



5 Volts and 18 or 28 Volts (I'm not sure)


Paul_KD7HB

Ok, the circuit boards have polyurethane conformal coating to protect the copper traces and soldered connections. The coating can be scraped away with a knife or can be burned away with a soldering iron. Then you can attach your wired to access the lights. No need to use the connectors.

Paul

Zapro

I made some reverse engineering and this is an electronic board:

5 Volts and 18 or 28 Volts (I'm not sure)
28 Volts. On everything else than airplanes, stuff are rated by their nominal voltage - in this case 24V.

In aeroplanes, it's rated by the generator voltage (charging voltage for battery) which is 28V

// Per.

tatersalad

That plug is called a cannon plug just a fyi, yes most aircraft is 28v DC for bulb lit, and if its phosphor lit its normally 115 400hz ac. As for the pin out you will just have to trace it out with a meter.. I work on aircraft simulators and we don't even have the schematics for the individual components like that

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