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Topic: capacitor markings (Read 759 times) previous topic - next topic

tommyokie

hey,
Ive got 2 ceramic capacitors, one with the makings:

2E
105K

and the other:

105K
100H

does anyone know what the 2E on the first one, and the 100H on the second mean?
I need 1 uF ceramic capacitors rated for 120V or higher for a project. These caps are obviosly 1uF, but I dont know the voltage rating.

thanks in advance

wvmarle

A clear photo of the cap and markings and any logos can be very helpful. Such markings may be related to specific types and/or manufacturers.
Quality of answers is related to the quality of questions. Good questions will get good answers. Useless answers are a sign of a poor question.

ChrisTenone

What, I need to say something else too?

tommyokie

here's a picture of both of the capacitors

wvmarle

Based on the shape I'd guess this are film caps, rather than ceramic caps.
Quality of answers is related to the quality of questions. Good questions will get good answers. Useless answers are a sign of a poor question.

allanhurst

Both seem to be 1uF.  (10 x 10E5 pF)

The one on the right might be 100v rating

Can't you measure them?

Allan

tommyokie

Based on the shape I'd guess this are film caps, rather than ceramic caps.
does the one on the left look big enough for 120 volts, being film?

allanhurst; the one being 100 volt sounds right

allanhurst

Not necessarily - could be any voltage with a different dielectric.

Allan

MarkT

Both seem to be 1uF.  (10 x 10E5 pF)

The one on the right might be 100v rating

Can't you measure them?

Allan
There is no non-destructive way to measure a capacitors voltage rating I know of!

You can graph leakage current v. voltage and pray it doesn't breakdown I suppose.
[ I will NOT respond to personal messages, I WILL delete them, use the forum please ]

ChrisTenone

Not necessarily - could be any voltage with a different dielectric.

Allan
Right.

Different caps have different rating, and each manufacturer had their own coding - usually tied to factory runs based on expenditures rather than specification ratings. When I worked in component manufacturing as a Quality Engineer with Raychem, my goal was to satisfy the customer's needs. They usually had a minimum standard, but the actual rating was a throw-away number.
What, I need to say something else too?

wvmarle

Size does not mean much. Different type, different film, different dielectric and you have different ratings.
I have film caps rated 250V that appear to match the size of yours - no scale so no way to say that for sure - and those are 22 or 47 nF not 1uF. Anyway, that doesn't say ANYTHING about your caps.

Also you said you need ceramic caps. In some applications they're interchangeable, in others not.
Quality of answers is related to the quality of questions. Good questions will get good answers. Useless answers are a sign of a poor question.

tommyokie

i tried 120v on the bigger one and it worked fine but, if there is not way to really tell what the readings mean. i guess i should just not trust either of these caps for 120 volts then and find some new ones with clear ratings

allanhurst

Decent capacitors aren't expensive  - buy some rated for the duty you need rather than trust ones pulled out of another device.

Allan

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