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Topic: Which type of strpboard do you prefer? (Read 835 times) previous topic - next topic

wvmarle

I use ready-made modules for those.

Such modules are cheap (I pay the equivalent of less then USD 1 a piece - 12V to 5V fixed output) and guaranteed to work quite well, it's just not worth the effort of trying to design my own for that. So even doing that on custom PCBs. Quick and easy :-)
Quality of answers is related to the quality of questions. Good questions will get good answers. Useless answers are a sign of a poor question.


wvmarle

I still prefer to use breakout boards for the SMD parts, and through-hole parts where possible.

Then the same IC can be used on breadboard, then on perfboard, and when testing is done recovered and used in another project (most ICs I don't buy in bags of 100 or 1000 like resistors and capacitors).

SMD parts are for actual PCBs. Unless you must... like the 47 uF ceramic caps I have in my kit, needed that for an experiment and those come only in SMD package, though they're also so big they easily go on regular perfboard.
Quality of answers is related to the quality of questions. Good questions will get good answers. Useless answers are a sign of a poor question.

Grumpy_Mike

SMD ceramic capacitors are much better for decoupling than leaded parts. And they fit well across adjacent tracks.

Watcher

Quote
SMD ceramic capacitors are much better for decoupling than leaded parts. And they fit well across adjacent tracks.
True!

wvmarle

It's just that so many ICs have their GND and Vcc pins on the far ends... (4 and 8 for OpAmps, for example).
Luckily leaded parts are usually good enough.
Wth adjacent pins for power it'd be convenient to solder an SMD cap right on top of the power pins, next to the package itself, and just leave it in place in between experiments.
Quality of answers is related to the quality of questions. Good questions will get good answers. Useless answers are a sign of a poor question.

Grumpy_Mike

Yes but a lot of modern chips have power and ground next to each other or facing each other. For the chips that don't there is less of an advantage using SMD capacitors but if you make the impedance to to the wire side it is likely to be better than a leaded part.

My prefrance is to have a ground track next to the power pin and solder the capacitor from the scocket pin directly over to the ground track. This can fit under the chip and not use up a hole row.


Watcher

One thing that I ve noticed is that when circuits get more complex with many interconnections and wiring, stripboard prototypes are hard to debug once things don't work as expected.

You are never sure if the reason is a short /bad / wrong connection or the design itself.

Paul__B

You are never sure if the reason is a short /bad / wrong connection or the design itself.
Better than "solderless breadboards" then!  :smiley-roll:

MarkT

One thing that I ve noticed is that when circuits get more complex with many interconnections and wiring, stripboard prototypes are hard to debug once things don't work as expected.

You are never sure if the reason is a short /bad / wrong connection or the design itself.
The phrase "close visual inspection" springs to mind - always worth doing.
[ I will NOT respond to personal messages, I WILL delete them, use the forum please ]

Grumpy_Mike

Better than "solderless breadboards" then!  :smiley-roll:
Yes quite.

With a solderless bread board you know you have a bad connection, so the first step in debugging is to jiggle the components up and down.

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