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Topic: Punctuation Marks and Etc. of the English Language  (Read 6670 times) previous topic - next topic

Robin2

Not like that


Like this


...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

ardly

The above sentence is taken from some other Section of this Forum. I am looking for some kinds of improvements that could be contributed in this sentence in respect of subject-verb and antecedent-pronoun agreements. I would like to propose the following form of the above sentence.  

"The best projects often use a microcontrollers with external chips to enhance and complement their it's capabilities."

My query/question: Is there any chance that a reader might associate the pronoun (their) with projects or chips and not with microcontrollers? Is there a way to paraphrase the sentence so that the said ambiguity (if any) could be avoided/minimized in respect of antecedent-pronoun agreement?


In your solution the fact that the 'projects' and the 'microcontrollers' are now both plural does make the meaning of 'their' ambiguous. It could also be taken as meaning that the best projects use multiple micropocessors.
I thought the the original was clear. The best projects use a single microprocessor and it's (the microprocessor) capabilities are enhanced by external chips.
"Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored" - Aldous Huxley

AWOL

The best projects use a single microprocessor and it's (the microprocessor) capabilities are enhanced by external chips.
sp. "its capabilities"

ardly

sp. "its capabilities"
I always get confused by its v it's , you are correct;
     The word it's is always short for 'it is' (as in it's raining), or in informal speech, for 'it has' (as in it's got six legs).
     The word its means 'belonging to it' (as in hold its head still while I jump on its back). It is a possessive pronoun like his.
"Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored" - Aldous Huxley

GolamMostafa

#79
Mar 15, 2019, 10:53 am Last Edit: Mar 15, 2019, 10:56 am by GolamMostafa
I thought the the original was clear. The best projects use a single microprocessor and it's (the microprocessor) capabilities are enhanced by external chips.
sp. "its capabilities"
Knowing that it's is a contraction for 'it is or it has' and its is a 'possessive case', the original sentence may take the following form

"The best projects often use a microcontroller with external chips to enhance and complement its (microcontroller) capabilities."


Robin2

I always get confused by its v it's , you are correct;
In typical English fashion it behaves exactly opposite to the usual way to create possessive nouns which are normally denoted by a single quote as in the man's shoes

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

ardly

Knowing that it's is a contraction for 'it is or it has' and its is a 'possessive case', the original sentence may take the following form

"The best projects often use a microcontroller with external chips to enhance and complement its (microcontroller) capabilities."


Yes, that is the way I understood the original.
Because 'projects' is plural and 'micronctroller' is singular there is no ambiguity that "its capabilities" means the microcontrollers capapbilities.
If both are plural you get;
"The best projects often use microcontrollers with external chips to enhance and complement their capabilities."
Which could be read as
"The best projects often use microcontrollers (with external chips) to enhance and complement their capabilities." or
"The best projects often use microcontrollers (with external chips to enhance and complement their capabilities)."
if that makes sense.
"Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored" - Aldous Huxley

Robin2

Which could be read as
"The best projects often use microcontrollers (with external chips) to enhance and complement their capabilities." or
"The best projects often use microcontrollers (with external chips to enhance and complement their capabilities)."
Both of those versions are technically correct   :)

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

ChrisTenone

Chips enhance micro-controllers.



Not like that


Like this


...R
We call those fries. If it's to enhance micros, it's called ... fries electronics.
What, I need to say something else too?

dougp

Everything we call real is made of things that cannot be regarded as real.  If quantum mechanics hasn't profoundly shocked you, you haven't understood it yet. - Niels Bohr

No private consultations undertaken!

ardly

In typical English fashion it behaves exactly opposite to the usual way to create possessive nouns which are normally denoted by a single quote as in the man's shoes

...R
There are lots of rules like 'i' before 'e' except after 'c' , but not much science.
"Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored" - Aldous Huxley

AWOL

There are lots of rules like 'i' before 'e' except after 'c' , but not much science.
Fiesty!

neiklot


Robin2

There are lots of rules like 'i' before 'e' except after 'c' , but not much science.
Neat.

I think you will discover that the I before E rule only applies when the sound is an eee

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

GolamMostafa

#89
Mar 20, 2019, 04:11 pm Last Edit: Mar 20, 2019, 04:22 pm by GolamMostafa
There are lots of rules like 'i' before 'e' except after 'c' , but not much science.
Was the word 'science' formed based on the stated rules?  If not, why are we so aware about the syntactical and semantic rules (the rules that we have deduced from the language itself) of the Language?

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