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Topic: Punctuation Marks and Etc. of the English Language  (Read 5932 times) previous topic - next topic

GolamMostafa

"I am writing you a long letter because I don't have time to write a short one"
Again: If I am asked to analyse the above quoted sentence, I would do --

The writer is making a transition from one sentence (I am writing you a long letter) to another sentence (I don't have time to write a short one). In order to make a smooth transition, the grammar helps with a transitional adverb which is because. According to syntax rules, the transitional adverb needs to be punctuated and accordingly the sentence becomes as:

I am writing you a long letter; because, I don't have time to write a short one.

ChrisTenone

Using a semicolon indicates a lack of moral fiber.
What, I need to say something else too?

Robin2

Consider then, perhaps, a hyphen; "In-school diligence is desirable". :D
IMHO that has a somewhat different meaning. I am not good at this but I think "in-school" is an adjective. I am thinking of it as being similar to "in-flight meal".

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

Robin2

I am writing you a long letter; because, I don't have time to write a short one.
I think you are just trying to use up some spare punctuation marks that are cluttering your in-tray.

Time to stop. Throw everything except the full-stops in the trash.


...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

Henry_Best

Re: Subject line.

Etcetera means "and other stuff" so you don't need the "and" before the "etc."

GolamMostafa

Re: Subject line.

Etcetera means "and other stuff" so you don't need the "and" before the "etc."
In electrical technology, AC means "Alternating Current"; so, there is no need to say "AC Current"; but, almost everybody says "AC Current".

DaveEvans


Robin2

But almost nobody says "and etc."   :D
I had not given it a lot of thought but I assumed the title meant that the OP wished to discuss the use of "Etc" and the use of punctuation.

In other words I subconsciously interpreted the title as
"Etc" and Punctuation Marks of the English Language

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

GolamMostafa

#38
Nov 03, 2018, 03:32 am Last Edit: Nov 03, 2018, 11:26 am by GolamMostafa
I had not given it a lot of thought but I assumed the title meant that the OP wished to discuss the use of "Etc" and the use of punctuation.

In other words I subconsciously interpreted the title as
"Etc" and Punctuation Marks of the English Language
I have two items in the Title, which are Punctuation Marks and Etc.. What else is there except the coordinating conjunction and that can help me to glue these two items?

I did not like to put Etc. at the beginning of the Title as my priority was to discuss the usage of Punctuation Marks.

Moreover, I have followed the guide lines of the IEEE Standard in the formation of the Title. In this standard, a full stop (.) is not allowed anywhere in the Title; but, in my case Etc. is itself a word with an embedded full stop.

Robin2

I have two items in the Title, which are Punctuation Marks and Etc.. What else is there except the coordinating conjunction and that can help me to glue these two items?
This is a situation where standard English usage does NOT use an "and". The correct usage is
Punctuation Marks etc. of the English Language
The reason is quite simple "etc is short for "et cetera" which literally means (according to my dictionary)  "and the rest" and colloquially means "and other similar things"

The addition of the "and" changes the meaning of the sentence.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

ardly

I read it as;
In school, diligence is desirable, but some students do not realise that.
I don't like that. In my limited understanding of grammer a comma serves three uses
  • To separate items in a list.
  • To provide pause for breath and perhaps emphasis.
  • To bracket optional additional information that can be omitted.


In the above there is no list, the commas are not for breath and the sentence "In school but some students do not realise that" does not make sense.

I am happy with a single comma or even better none.
I like the idea that colon and semi-colon use shows a lack of moral fibre.
"Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored" - Aldous Huxley

AWOL

Quote
In my limited understanding of grammer
Oh!The irony :D

ardly

"Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored" - Aldous Huxley

msssltd

  • To separate items in a list.
  • To provide pause for breath and perhaps emphasis.
  • To bracket optional additional information that can be omitted.

All three examples are pauses of lesser or greater extent.

Quote
"In the above there is no list, the commas are not for breath and the sentence "In school but some students do not realise that" does not make sense."
I beg to differ(!)

"In school diligence is desirable but some students do not realise that. (sic.)"

'School' and 'diligence' are both nouns

Two nouns may be conjoined with a hyphen...
"In school-diligence is desirable (!)"

...Or they may be separated, as a list.
"In school, diligence is desirable but some students do not realise it."

Quote
I am happy with a single comma or even better none.
Technical English is written using open form punctuation, omitting all that is not essential.  English language students are taught the more expressive and pedantic, closed form, punctuation.


GolamMostafa

#44
Nov 06, 2018, 05:36 am Last Edit: Nov 06, 2018, 06:07 am by GolamMostafa
Technical English is written using open form punctuation, omitting all that is not essential.  English language students are taught the more expressive and pedantic, closed form, punctuation.
Then why are the Technical School going students burdened with so many years of English Language Course (in my country, it is for 13 years for non-natives) if they are not required to practice strictly the punctuation rules of the language?

The following excerpt is taken from a recent post of an anonymous poster of some other section of this Forum. Is the line well punctuated in respect of the use of the transitional adverb -- otherwise?

I'm assuming that 'distance' and 'maxDistance' are 'int', otherwise there would be no need to promote them to 'long'.  

In the punctuation class, we have learnt that the smooth transition from one clause to another clause in a sentence should be made through the use of a punctuated 'transitional adverb.' In this case, the punctuation marks are the semi-colon and comma which are to be placed before and after the transitional adverb (the otherwise). The rule is more than 100 years old, and it is still found in the 'Text Book of English Grammar.'

I am sure that the reviewer of my Technical Journal/Conference paper would alert me to punctuate the above-quoted sentence and in response, I would re-write this way:

I'm assuming that 'distance' and 'maxDistance' are 'int'; otherwise, there would be no need to promote them to 'long'.

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