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Topic: perma proto boards -- any that really match breadboard pattern? (Read 2129 times) previous topic - next topic

Tazling

I am about to transfer from breadboard mess to a more orderly PCB setup and one of the items I was going to transfer to the New World was a breadboard power supply -- the kind that feeds both rails on a breadboard with either 3.3v or 5v (jumper selectable).  YwRobot makes them, there are other brands, I have a drawer full of 'em.  They fit into any of the 2-rail breadboards on the market.

So I hauled out a handy Adafruit half-sized "perma proto board" to use as the P/S' new permanent home, only to find out that although it looks like a regular breadboard, the hole spacing is actually different -- so that the bb power supply doesn't fit on it!  The error is not so small, over the nearly 2 inch span it is out by about 2 holes.

Smaller breakouts with 4 to 8 pins seem to plug into the Adafruit proto board OK; the hole spacing end-to-end (long axis) seems more standard than side-to-side (short axis). 

So... argh.  Minor roadblock.  Complaining to Adarfruit probably won't help, certainly won't get me a usable PCB any time soon.  Does anyone know of a fairly high quality perma-proto board that mimics a breadboard, like the Adafruit product but scaled exactly like a real breadboard?  So that these 2-rail power supplies will fit into it?

groundFungus

Dr. Azzy, a forum contributor, offers some boards on his site that may meet your requirements.

Tazling

Thanks GroundFungus, I just had a look at his range of PCBs and though they are really nifty (and inspiring) I don't see one that replicates exact layout of a conventional breadboard... maybe I've found a new market niche here?

TomGeorge

Hi,
If you google     prototyping strip boards

Then select "images", you will possibly see what you need.

Tom... :)
Everything runs on smoke, let the smoke out, it stops running....

polymorph

Part of the problem is that there are multiple breadboard layouts, slightly different from each other.

I think TomGeorge has the correct solution. Figure out what your breadboard layout is, and match it to the images you find.
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ChrisTenone

I have used this one from Sparkfun, and it seems to have all the holes in the right places.

What, I need to say something else too?

sterretje

This type (first one I saw) would be my preference. Easy to use with dual-in-line ICs (power rails go under the IC so you can add decoupling capitors close to the IC). Easy to solder extra wires as islands are connected (so no soldering to pins of components for connections).

I used to use them long ago for all kinds of prototyping.

If you understand an example, use it.
If you don't understand an example, don't use it.

Electronics engineer by trade, software engineer by profession. Trying to get back into electronics after 15 years absence.

Tazling

Hi all, thanks for tips.  I have ordered some of the Sparkfun red boards to try out.   Also will try a similar black board by OSEPP (?) and compare.

I have used the Banggood boards and they are OK but ... copper one side only, no through plating, & copper is a little thin imho.  Definitely not the same build quality as the adafruit offering (but oh boy the price is right).

sterretje

It was just to show the type ;) No idea about the quality. banggood and the likes did not exist 40-odd years ago 8)
If you understand an example, use it.
If you don't understand an example, don't use it.

Electronics engineer by trade, software engineer by profession. Trying to get back into electronics after 15 years absence.

Tazling

I have been trying to prevent my electronics hobby from getting any further out of hand :-)  but have to confess I'm starting to wonder about making my own circuit boards.  I made PCBs back in the very early 80's, one-offs in a lab setting, and it was a vile process.  Godawful chemicals, stinks, tedious, labour intensive, ugly.  I hope that the carbon tet I carelessly dabbled in back then will not catch up with me...

I was grimly creating a rail on my shield board by so-carefully soldering fine bare wire from pin to pin, and thinking, "gee, technology must have marched on by now, I wonder how hard it is to create a custom PCB today?"  Something to research :-) 

[after a quick fit of googling]:  well, no magic bullets yet.  Looks like etching still yields the cleanest result even if you use a 3d printer to lay down the resist.  Ferric chloride, no thanks :-)  The alternative (conductive goo) is homebrew but kind of crude:

https://www.instructables.com/id/3D-Printing-3D-Print-A-Solderless-Circuit-Board/

The consensus seems to be:  live with nasty etch chemicals, or send out your pcb design to a fab house.  Even for a one-off.

Paul__B

The consensus seems to be:  live with nasty etch chemicals, or send out your PCB design to a fab house.  Even for a one-off.
Yet to do it, but I would definitely go with the latter.  Bottle of ferric chloride has been sitting in the laundry (hopefully) untouched for 26 years now!

westfw

Quote
I hauled out a handy Adafruit half-sized "perma proto board" to use as the P/S' new permanent home, only to find out that although it looks like a regular breadboard, the hole spacing is actually different -- so that the bb power supply doesn't fit on it!  The error is not so small, over the nearly 2 inch span it is out by about 2 holes.
It looks like most "real" protoboards have 0.3 inch between the vertical strip and the horizontal strip, to account for the volume of plastic in the mating pieces, while the Adafruit permaprotos have a more aesthetic and compact 0.2 inch gap (since they're all one-piece high-strength fiberglass anyway.)
Never noticed, and I hadn't thought about the pre-made power things not matching - you might mention it to them - I don't know that they'll change it, but it would be good to have it pointed out.
You could easily have 10 boards that match your requirement exactly (as long as they don't exceed 100mm length - about 38 positions) made for about $3/board...  You can even download the Adafruit design files and modify them as needed...
Also, I have an EAGLE ULP where you "run protoboard", specify the number of rows and where you want power rails (inside, outside, both), and it'll plop down the design on a PCB...  It currently uses the 0.3 inch separation for outside power rails...

ChrisTenone

It looks like most "real" protoboards have 0.3 inch between the vertical strip and the horizontal strip, to account for the volume of plastic in the mating pieces, while the Adafruit permaprotos have a more aesthetic and compact 0.2 inch gap (since they're all one-piece high-strength fiberglass anyway.)
Never noticed, and I hadn't thought about the pre-made power things not matching - you might mention it to them - I don't know that they'll change it, but it would be good to have it pointed out.
You could easily have 10 boards that match your requirement exactly (as long as they don't exceed 100mm length - about 38 positions) made for about $3/board...  You can even download the Adafruit design files and modify them as needed...
Also, I have an EAGLE ULP where you "run protoboard", specify the number of rows and where you want power rails (inside, outside, both), and it'll plop down the design on a PCB...  It currently uses the 0.3 inch separation for outside power rails...

The Sparkfun permaprotos pictured above have the "correct" spacing between the circuit holes and the power holes, so a 'breadboard power supply' fits just fine.
What, I need to say something else too?

Paul__B

The Sparkfun permaprotos pictured above have the "correct" spacing between the circuit holes and the power holes, so a 'breadboard power supply' fits just fine.
Not that it is much use other than a way of connecting a USB lead to provide 5 V.  :smiley-eek:

westfw

Quote
Not that it is much use other than a way of connecting a USB lead to provide 5 V
I dunno.  Some of those boards also have a barrel jack, both 5V and 3V regulators, and switches to select 3V/5V on each side.  Pretty nice for < $1...

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