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Topic: Arduino life span? Best on/off intervals for long installations? (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

isaralynn

May 20, 2017, 06:08 pm Last Edit: May 20, 2017, 06:13 pm by isaralynn Reason: Added attachment
Hello! I have a project that will be part of a 2 month long exhibition.  This means the project will be active 5 days a week, 7 hours a day for 2 months.   I am concerned with how long the arduino fio (and the other components) that run the piece will last.  The piece uses a 12v 5amp power supply that connects to a circuit that powers an actuator and arduino fio.  The actuator is triggered frequently.  The full duration of the piece is 5 minutes long.

I was wondering if using a Short Period Repeat Cycle Outlet Timer would help sustain the life of the piece.  I could set it to be powered on for 5 minutes, then off for 3 minutes.  I was curious if powering the arduino off/on like that is actually good or bad?  Is it better to have the piece on for 30 straight minutes and then off for 10 minutes?  What are the best intervals, or do you have other solutions to prevent burn out?

I'm attaching a schematic of the circuit.  Sorry it's a little rough, and someone helped me build it, I'm kinda a newbie.


Delta_G

Tell us about the project.  The Arduino would be perfectly fine running constantly for 20 years or more, so 2 months is nothing.  What other components are you worried about?  For many components, on-off cycles are worse than just leaving them run. 
|| | ||| | || | ||  ~Woodstock

Please do not PM with technical questions or comments.  Keep Arduino stuff out on the boards where it belongs.

isaralynn

I guess aside from the arduino, I'm also worried about the regulator (Mosfet LD33CV) and the Converter 12V Step Down to 3.3V 3A. The circuit also uses some diodes, resistors, LEDs.  

I didn't know arduinos last that long.

This is the actuator I use: https://www.sciplus.com/p/power-door-lock_47851?ppc=shopping1&gclid=CjwKCAjw0v_IBRAEEiwA3--1Ns_CdPfrHjDO07MggrcYxsXgLbVF3r36c92kzk-WXWhfHaNFwLX1UBoCb1AQAvD_BwE


Basically the piece uses an arduino fio with a blink sketch to trigger the actuator to make a kick drum pedal beat on a kick drum.  It's powered from a wall outlet.

Delta_G

That should run constantly for decades.  If the regulator gets hot then put a heat sink on it.  That's about the only thing you'd need to be concerned with. 
|| | ||| | || | ||  ~Woodstock

Please do not PM with technical questions or comments.  Keep Arduino stuff out on the boards where it belongs.

isaralynn

Great! I do already have a heat sink on the regulator.  So I guess it doesn't matter either way if I turn it on/off vs. just leave it running?  If I want a delay between when the sketch loops should I just factor in a delay at the end of the code, or turn the piece off?

Delta_G

Just stick a delay in there.  Power cycles would be worse than just leaving it on.
|| | ||| | || | ||  ~Woodstock

Please do not PM with technical questions or comments.  Keep Arduino stuff out on the boards where it belongs.

isaralynn


isaralynn

After being on for 56 minutes (and being triggered almost every second) I noticed my door lock actuator feels pretty warm.  Is that anything to worry about?

This is the actuator I use: https://www.sciplus.com/p/power-door-lock_47851?ppc=shopping1&gclid=CjwKCAjw0v_IBRAEEiwA3--1Ns_CdPfrHjDO07MggrcYxsXgLbVF3r36c92kzk-WXWhfHaNFwLX1UBoCb1AQAvD_BwE

Paul_KD7HB

After being on for 56 minutes (and being triggered almost every second) I noticed my door lock actuator feels pretty warm.  Is that anything to worry about?

This is the actuator I use: https://www.sciplus.com/p/power-door-lock_47851?ppc=shopping1&gclid=CjwKCAjw0v_IBRAEEiwA3--1Ns_CdPfrHjDO07MggrcYxsXgLbVF3r36c92kzk-WXWhfHaNFwLX1UBoCb1AQAvD_BwE
Those are made to be used intermittently. How much time is used to actuate the lock and how much time is power removed. Most electronics is ok if you can keep you hand on it.

Paul

TomGeorge

Hi,

Can you please post a complete copy of your circuit, in CAD or a picture of a hand drawn circuit in jpg, png?

Using component symbols and labelling pins etc.

You diag does not tell us where the actuator is connected, where your Arduino is connected, what model Arduino are you using.

Thanks.. Tom... :)
Everything runs on smoke, let the smoke out, it stops running....

aarg

After being on for 56 minutes (and being triggered almost every second) I noticed my door lock actuator feels pretty warm.  Is that anything to worry about?
It would be if it were a mass produced product, since wasted electricity has an environmental impact. Also some components age faster when they're warm, like electrolytic capacitors. Sometimes if the case is warm, it can mean that something inside is much hotter than you believe it is.
  ... with a transistor and a large sum of money to spend ...
Please don't PM me with technical questions. Post them in the forum.

isaralynn

Update:  Everything lasted the whole exhibition no problem except my door lock actuators (they lasted between 5-8 days).  The piece did run in 30 minute intervals, with a 5 minute break.  I'm on the hunt for a better motor solution, but haven't found anything yet :/  Some rack and pinion type have been recommended to me, but I haven't been able to find a viable one that will work with my project yet. Need something that will pull 1" multiple times a second for extended durations.

wvmarle

Need something that will pull 1" multiple times a second for extended durations.
Sounds like a job for a solenoid. Door openers are built around solenoids usually. Very likely those door openers are made with a somewhat underpowered solenoid, as they're designed to be on for a few seconds at a time, then off for long time. So a smaller solenoid makes them cheaper, but won't last when pushed like you do.
Quality of answers is related to the quality of questions. Good questions will get good answers. Useless answers are a sign of a poor question.

isaralynn

Update #2:  I've updated my motors to these solenoids: https://www.mcmaster.com/70155k611

I haven't used them in an exhibition yet, but they are much quieter and seem a lot more reliable than the previous motors I was using since these don't use any plastic gears that can go bad.

Rx7man

Might want to look into dual-circuit solenoids.. They have a high power "pull-in" coil and a low power "hold" coil, this gives them both the strength to pull with significant force, as well as a low power draw so they can stay on for extended periods of time without overheating.. There are also microchips (LM1947) designed for fuel injectors that can be repurposed for this, the drop the amperage by a factor of 4 after a set time which drastically reduces heat buildup in the coil.

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