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Topic: race timer for flying object (Read 426 times) previous topic - next topic

Hexos

Hello,

I am seeking your help to build a timer for flying objects. The plan is to have a detective sensor on the start line and another one on the finish line. it should detect the flying objects with max hight of 1 meter and the width of the start and finish line will be from 10 - 15 meters. During my research I found LiDAR sensor (product in the link : http://www.benewake.com/en/tf02.html ) it sounds to me is the perfect solution for my product. few questions and looking for help.

is it the best sensor to develop my product or their are other suggestion?


is it possible to receive the data from the sensor through wire less methods and use arduino to start the counter timer considering the distance between the start line and finish line is about 400 meter?

looking forward to hear back from the experts.


srnet

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slipstick

And what sort of speed are they travelling at? Wireless connections always have the possibility of both data loss and timing lag/latency.

Steve

Hexos

What are the 'objects' ?




The object will be falcons and the speed around 100 km +

Power_Broker

The linked sensor measures the distance at a singular point in front of it. If the falcons do not fly EXACTLY over it, you will miss the falcon completely.

You'd probably do best with cameras at either end. You might also be interested in this: https://rfidtiming.com/project-details/running/
"The desire that guides me in all I do is the desire to harness the forces of nature to the service of mankind."
   - Nikola Tesla

Paul_KD7HB

Your falcons are used to carrying little transmitters. Make a package of an IR lLED and a NE555 to flash the led at the normal IR remote frequency of 38 kHz. Make a sensor to detect the modulated LED that has a narrow vertical slit to minimize the side view.

The sensor will detect the bird when it is in view of the sensor. You can take the project from there.

Paul

Power_Broker

Your falcons are used to carrying little transmitters. Make a package of an IR lLED and a NE555 to flash the led at the normal IR remote frequency of 38 kHz. Make a sensor to detect the modulated LED that has a narrow vertical slit to minimize the side view.

The sensor will detect the bird when it is in view of the sensor. You can take the project from there.

Paul
Is modulation alone going to be enough to make this setup work in direct sunlight reliably? Especially at range? Maybe so, but I think that's a long shot.
"The desire that guides me in all I do is the desire to harness the forces of nature to the service of mankind."
   - Nikola Tesla

Hexos

The linked sensor measures the distance at a singular point in front of it. If the falcons do not fly EXACTLY over it, you will miss the falcon completely.

You'd probably do best with cameras at either end. You might also be interested in this: https://rfidtiming.com/project-details/running/
I want to avoid attaching any chip to the falcons for so many different reasons. still finding ways to detect the falcon through the laser scanner or ultrasonic sensors.

Power_Broker

I want to avoid attaching any chip to the falcons for so many different reasons. still finding ways to detect the falcon through the laser scanner or ultrasonic sensors.
In that case, using cameras with timestamps will be your best option - trust me
"The desire that guides me in all I do is the desire to harness the forces of nature to the service of mankind."
   - Nikola Tesla

wvmarle

It sounds to me like you have to look into how they do timing for sports events, specifically running events. Your falcons may be even harder though, as the height at which the pass the start and finish lines is not that well determined (that's the difference between flying mid air and running on solid ground).
Quality of answers is related to the quality of questions. Good questions will get good answers. Useless answers are a sign of a poor question.

dougp

If you're talking lasers something like this might get you started.  Commercial systems are $pendy, though.
Everything we call real is made of things that cannot be regarded as real.  If quantum mechanics hasn't profoundly shocked you, you haven't understood it yet. - Niels Bohr

No private consultations undertaken!

wvmarle

Another possible solution is the ballistic chronograph.

It seems they rely on the projectile breaking the fast scanning beams (normally reflected back by the reflectors above it) to detect, in your case you would have to reverse this: make sure your falcons reflect the laser's light sufficiently, so it can see them passing over as there's a reflection where normally there is none.
Quality of answers is related to the quality of questions. Good questions will get good answers. Useless answers are a sign of a poor question.

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