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Topic: Breadboard differences (Read 299 times) previous topic - next topic

Decired

Hi.

Is there any difference between breadboards at all? I need 15 of em and the cheapest one that i found in my local store are this.


Is it the same that i received with my starter kit? (i googled and found out that there is no difference at all, but i want to be sure)
Thanks

Paul__B

So you post a picture and expect us to know what you received with your starter kit?

It is what it is.  It may be durable, it may be dodgy.  There is no way for us to know without it being in our own hands - and then needing to try it out.  Branding may - perhaps - be relevant

What we now want to know is why you want fifteen of them?  :smiley-roll:

And not sixteen.

larryd

Buy units that have 'two' power rails on top and on bottom.

Buying the the cheapest sometimes means you get the cheapest. ;)





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groundFungus

#3
Apr 19, 2019, 04:29 pm Last Edit: Apr 19, 2019, 04:33 pm by groundFungus
Quote
Is it the same that i received with my starter kit?
How should we know which of the hundreds of starter kits that you have?

I bought a couple breadboards form YourDuino.com that are satisfactory and not expensive.



Note that the power rails are broken in the center so one must jumper the gap in the black squares to get power all the way across.

CrossRoads

The type in the original post look like what Radio Shack used to carry, and were not very good.

The kind with the separate pieces  (used for power/Gnd usually) that connect together with tabs are much better.

You can find them here, there are some on backplates with other terminals as well. The large one, 3250 points, is basically 4 of the single board, on backing plate, for less than 4x the cost of the single

http://www.dipmicro.com/store/index.php?searchStr=breadboard&act=viewCat&Submit=Search

If you're going to try and populate 15 of those as one project and keep it all running, good luck!  Secure them all in one place, document where all the parts are located with drawings, keep schematics up to date.  I have used ExpressPCB/ExpressSCH for doing that on wirewrap projects. Trying to keep a big project with all jumper wires can become a nightmare.

If you're making 15 of something, get one working and then move on to PCBs for the rest.

If you're running some kind of club or camp, that's about the only thing that makes sense to have 15 breadboards.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

larryd

"If you're running some kind of club or camp, that's about the only thing that makes sense to have 15 breadboards."

Hope this is the correct assumption.




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Decired

Got my answers.
I am giving a lesson, where each students will receive 1 breadboard, a couple of diodes, button and jump wires and then they will have to recreate a scheme which i will give them, thats why i am looking for them.

Thanks everyone.

groundFungus

Yourduino.com offers discounts for education. 

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Students and Teachers: Contact us to receive an Educator's Discount
Contact email at the bottom of this page.

MarkT

I'd recommend 6 contacts per row, not just 5, it makes quite a difference to usability, especially
if using any 0.6" wide ICs or modules.

My favorite are the "Advanced Solderless" breadboards like AD-11, AD-12, AD-13 etc, which
seem to be high quality, durable, etc.

Most cheap breadboards have issues, like jamming easily, losing tension in the connections,
lack of contoured holes to guide wires to the contacts.
[ I will NOT respond to personal messages, I WILL delete them, use the forum please ]

DrAzzy

Most cheap breadboards have issues, like jamming easily, losing tension in the connections,
lack of contoured holes to guide wires to the contacts.
Problems which are particularly troublesome when using them as a teaching tool - when the students cant trust the connections, it makes it much harder for them to learn, especially for the ones who are having trouble with the concepts (same effect as the math teacher who slips up when doing problems on the board - the strong students follow along, notice the error as he makes it and correct for it, while the weaker ones get lost)

Also, all those problems geg much worse if you are reusing the boards a lot, esp if things that barely fit are getting stuck into the holes.

I despise breadboard, in general, and never use it, and give my friends who do crap for it - when they show me something they made on breadboard, i usually get at least five minutes to make fun of them while they look for loose connections trying to make ig work.
ATTinyCore for x4/x5/x61/x7/x8/x41/1634/828/x313 megaTinyCore for the megaavr ATtinies - Board Manager:
http://drazzy.com/package_drazzy.com_index.json
ATtiny breakouts, mosfets, awesome prototyping board in my store http://tindie.com/stores/DrAzzy

CrossRoads

Those 6-hole breadboards don't seem common in the US.
K&H breadboards, I'm not seeing a US source.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

ShermanP

There definitely is a difference, and a bad breadboard is just constant frustration.  Here's a possible source of good breadboards at the right price.  But I would sure order one tto check out before springing for 14 more.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i3xKO8qe9Os

And here's another take on breadboards:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XKQJhe9n_ug



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