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Topic: Arduino PWM regulator with IGBT (Read 238 times) previous topic - next topic

milutinkg

Hello
I need help.I make big HHO generetor,and I want to controll current with arduino .I want to make PID regulator current.I have current sensor.But my question is to switching IGBT transistor.I put the picture.Ca it work like on the picture.
I have IGBT https://www.mouser.com/ds/2/149/FGH40N60SFD-889108.pdf

WattsThat

I'm not joking or being sarcastic when I say this, you need to find another project.

For starters, you cannot drive an IGBT with a junk Chinese IRF540 low side switch board. Seriously, all you'll accomplish is blowing things up in very dangerous ways.

320 volts DC is positively lethal and 5000 watts of power is enough to make components explode with the force of a gunshot. This is not something that can be undertaken by an amateur, it's a death wish.
Vacuum tube guy in a solid state world

wvmarle

Agreed, this sounds scary, and in the category of "if you have to ask, you're not up to it".

That's a lot of power, it being about DC makes it a LOT worse! Even just switching that kind of power on and off is not trivial, it will arc big time.
Quality of answers is related to the quality of questions. Good questions will get good answers. Useless answers are a sign of a poor question.

MarkT

Hello
I need help.I make big HHO generetor,and I want to controll current with arduino .I want to make PID regulator current.I have current sensor.But my question is to switching IGBT transistor.I put the picture.Ca it work like on the picture.
I have IGBT https://www.mouser.com/ds/2/149/FGH40N60SFD-889108.pdf

The IGBT needs push-pull drive using a gate-driver chip.  MOSFET and IGBT gates are capacitive and cannot be
driven single-ended - they require charge to be pushed into and pulled out of the gate actively.  Your circuit can only push charge into the gate, but cannot remove it, so the device cannot turn off.

A single MIC4422 at 15V supply will handle as large an IGBT as you can think of, its a powerful gate driver that can handle upto 18V supply and provides many amps of drive.

With this sort of level of voltage and power you are wasting your time trying to build a discrete gate-driver circuit use a gate driver chip, and follow the example circuits and layout given in the datasheet.

20V is too large a voltage to drive an IGBT, they are designed for 15V. 

Gate driver chips require lots of good decoupling close to the package, I'd suggest 1uF + 10uF ceramic within
millimeters of the chip.  The distance from driver chip to IGBT should be as short as possible and as low inductance as possible.
[ I will NOT respond to personal messages, I WILL delete them, use the forum please ]


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