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Topic: Toaster in the bath (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

PerryBebbington

#15
Jul 21, 2019, 11:33 am Last Edit: Jul 21, 2019, 11:34 am by PerryBebbington
I used to play with carbon arcs made from dry-cell cores and a "salt water rheostat", direct off wall AC (110v.)  Ahh, those lovely 60s "science experiments for kids" books...

Well you Americans with your namby-pamby 110V mains! How is anyone supposed to have a seriously interesting accident with such a pathetic mains voltage? Over here we have the proper stuff, my supply is around 250V, you can get proper injuries with that!

Dad had a motor generator set, which comprised a 1/3HP motor coupled to a car generator (note generator, not alternator), which he built for charging vehicle batteries. Great for powering model trains, great for drawing big arcs from carbon rods out of batteries. It didn't seem to object too much to the output being shorted out. Oh, and none of that silly H&S nonsense, there was no guard over the drive shaft, in fact the drive shaft worked well as a carrying handle.

larryd

Salt appears in the water when electricity starts to flow through the body.



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ChrisTenone

...

Dad had a motor generator set, which comprised a 1/3HP motor coupled to a car generator (note generator, not alternator), which he built for charging vehicle batteries. Great for powering model trains, great for drawing big arcs from carbon rods out of batteries. It didn't seem to object too much to the output being shorted out. Oh, and none of that silly H&S nonsense, there was no guard over the drive shaft, in fact the drive shaft worked well as a carrying handle.

My father's tool chest was full of ancient torture instruments. I remember when I was small, being so scared of his drill - the one that spit fire out the sides while it ran. It was really sparks from the barely insulated brushed motor.
What, I need to say something else too?

PerryBebbington

My father's tool chest was full of ancient torture instruments. I remember when I was small, being so scared of his drill - the one that spit fire out the sides while it ran. It was really sparks from the barely insulated brushed motor.
That sounds like ring fire, caused by carbon build up on the commutator (I so I was led to believe), nothing to do with eating too many chilies.

larryd

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groundFungus

#20
Jul 21, 2019, 08:37 pm Last Edit: Jul 21, 2019, 08:55 pm by groundFungus
Quote
the one that spit fire out the sides while it ran
I still have a drill like that.  My Grandfather's old Black and Decker all metal with 2 prong plug.  Must be late 40's early 50's vintage.  Still works great even with the light show.

PerryBebbington


Quote
I made this in my youth too.
NICE ONE!
++Karma;


ChrisTenone

I just want to know why there is an iron in the furnace picture?
What, I need to say something else too?

larryd

#23
Jul 22, 2019, 01:29 am Last Edit: Jul 22, 2019, 01:30 am by larryd
Bringing the carbon electrodes (rods) together shorts out the 120 hot to neutral, very bad.

Add the iron, the iron limits the current.

The electrodes starting to get red hot due to small resistance of the rod ends, air ionize, the arc starts, you move the rods apart, the arc grows to about 1 inch.

I used a hot plate :) .



No technical PMs.
If you are asked a question, please respond with an answer.
If you are asked for more information, please supply it.
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ChrisTenone

Here's the table-top, Vreeland emission spectroscope I used to use in gen chem lab:



What, I need to say something else too?

ChrisTenone

Bringing the carbon electrodes (rods) together shorts out the 120 hot to neutral, very bad.

Add the iron, the iron limits the current.

The electrodes starting to get red hot due to small resistance of the rod ends, air ionize, the arc starts, you move the rods apart, the arc grows to about 1 inch.

I used a hot plate :) .
I see, a high wattage resistor. The Vreeland has two coils of resistance wire on hollow ceramic cones in a cage on the other side.
What, I need to say something else too?

ardly

#26
Jul 26, 2019, 12:45 pm Last Edit: Jul 26, 2019, 02:40 pm by ardly
No point debating. Electroboom gets into the bath - ouch
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SHGo-52wCDc
"Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored" - Aldous Huxley

Robin2

Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

GoForSmoke

Back in school when I was reading about electricity there was a bit about AC killing people including radio fell in the tub.

What do you know that US AC 60Hz turns out to be just right for fibrillating the heart while Euro 50Hz is not.

I had a crossing guard in raincoat and boots and umbrella put her foot in a puddle to see if we kids were safe when she got hit by lightning. The charge went around her, no burns but in the hospital she said it was like a ton of bricks fell on her.

Stay safe, wear your raincoat and boots in the tub!
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink  <-- tasking Arduino 1-2-3
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial <-- techniques howto
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts
Your sketch can sense ongoing process events in time.
Your sketch can make events to control it over time.

raymw

Maybe of interest, before the newer 'electronical' wallwarts came in use., folk used to buy small  transformer types. Buy, 'em in America, they'd get hot in UK. higher frequency needs less iron.

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