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Topic: Why does EEPROM have a limited number of writes? (Read 652 times) previous topic - next topic

Clefsphere

Jul 23, 2019, 12:45 pm Last Edit: Jul 23, 2019, 12:46 pm by Clefsphere
It's pretty well known that EEPROM memory can only be written so many times. I just don't understand why there's a limit at all. There's no limit to reprogramming normal memory right? So why does this type of memory have a limit? I found this explanation, but I don't understand what it's saying about electrons:

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"First of all, the technology that makes EEPROM work also limits the number of times that it can be re-written. This has to do with electrons becoming trapped in the transistors that make up the ROM and building up until the charge difference between a "1" and a "0" is unrecognizable. But don't worry, most EEPROMs have a maximum re-write number of 1 million or more. As long as you're not continuously writing to the EERPROM it's unlikely you'll hit this maximum."
source: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/reading-and-writing-serial-eeproms/all

Does anyone understand how this works?

PaulS

Quote
There's no limit to reprogramming normal memory right?
Wrong. It's just that you are unlikely to upload code near as many times, so the number of writes is not a problem.
The art of getting good answers lies in asking good questions.

Clefsphere

Oh, I see. I suppose it is the same limiting factor? Something about electrons, ones and zeroes and black witchcraft.

srnet

Oh, I see. I suppose it is the same limiting factor? Something about electrons, ones and zeroes and black witchcraft.
No Witchcraft involved, just standard behaviour for the type of semiconductor used.
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