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Topic: How do you package it all - for daily use (Read 468 times) previous topic - next topic

DJDJDJDJ

Hi,

I have finally create a 2 relay setup to control two lights with ESP8266-12E module. My whole setup includes following:

- NodeMCU full size module with all header pins
- 2 Relay module (full module, not just the relays)
- Step Down Buck Converter to change PS from 9v to 5v
- Momentary push switch attached to a face plate (standard wall electrical plate)

I am planning to stuff the first three items in a plastic one-gang electrical box.

How would you connect the wires? Up until now I have used jumper wires. Is that what you use when deploying a project? If my NodeMCU didn't have all the header pins pre-attached, then I would attach only the ones I need but unfortunately, they are already attached. Do you usually remove them? If now how do you protect them?

Thank you for any assistance.

Robin2

How would you connect the wires? Up until now I have used jumper wires. Is that what you use when deploying a project? If my NodeMCU didn't have all the header pins pre-attached, then I would attach only the ones I need but unfortunately, they are already attached.
I'm not clear about what's in your mind - are you suggesting that you would just make soldered connections if the header pins were not in place? Certainly properly soldered connections would be reliable.

I would not make "permanent" connections with single jumper wires but I would be happy enough with wires connected to a multi-pin (or multi-socket) connector as then the load for the physical connection would be shared across a number of pins.

Alternatively, it may not be too difficult to remove the header pins.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

Geek Emeritus

#2
Oct 21, 2019, 03:56 pm Last Edit: Oct 21, 2019, 04:05 pm by Geek Emeritus
never buy a module that has less than two mounting holes. if you have no choice, like a level converter, solder on a male header. mount it on a perfboard that has a female header, and no less than two mounting screws

buy header strips. solder wires for one to one connections to header strips. get it right, once. hot glue or RTV for strain relief. never put a wire back in the wrong place in the future

for multiple connections buy these mini breadboards:



or these mini breadboards:



to proliferate I2C, power, ground, et cetera. those little colored ones let you have one input and four outputs, and you can unplug the header to make changes without poking a hot soldering iron into your project

I mount my projects on clear plexiglass. any tiny mistake glares like a lighthouse.

to make connections to the outside, I use DB connectors. you can find 9, 15, 15 pin VGA, 25, 37, 44 and 50 pin variants, with backshells. and you can buy these:



for temporary or permanent connections in male or female variants for every DB-XX
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 If you have not read "How to use this forum - please read", in particular: "7. If you are posting code or error messages, use "code" tags":  expect rude responses

MorganS

Is this mobile or portable? Then secure connections are important for every wire. If it is screwed to the wall then push-in jumper wires are acceptable.
"The problem is in the code you didn't post."

Geek Emeritus

#4
Oct 21, 2019, 05:50 pm Last Edit: Oct 21, 2019, 05:51 pm by Geek Emeritus
right answer, wrong thread, removed
All PMs will be deleted unopened due to arrogant argumentative pot stirring Malfoys.
 If you have not read "How to use this forum - please read", in particular: "7. If you are posting code or error messages, use "code" tags":  expect rude responses

Robin2

I would be very reluctant to use a solderless breadboard for a long term project. They are great from prototyping.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

DJDJDJDJ

Thank you everyone for great advice. Since I am a noob, I think tackling a task to remove 15 pins from the module that are connected to each other would be more than I can bargain for until my soldering skills are a bit better. :-)


I have never made any connectors for ribbon cables. Perhaps I start looking into that.

Project is going to be fixed at a location so portability is not needed. I could solder wires to the pins that I need but don't know what to do with the rest of the pins so that they do not, by mistake short with others if they get bent somehow. I could hot glue them so they are protected a bit.

In the future, I will, for sure, get modules without pins already attached.




saildude

I did a project on solder-less boards about 3 years back - covered 3 large boards and this year a couple of connections flaked out in the power section - and yes things stopped - was able to put some new jumpers parallel to the existing wires and now working while I order parts to move the project to solder boards

So - make it work on a breadboard then build a duplicate with soldered connections - I say build duplicate so you can copy the working project - then you have a working model if the transfer has a problem

Good Luck

Paul__B

The answer is "stripboard".
Here's some:

(Low stock on this particular item - "5 left" as I write this.)

You solder your pinned NodeMCU to it and then you can solder to the other positions on the strips.

saildude

Adafruit makes some boards that match the Proto-Boards but solder pads - come in 3 sizes 1/4 size - 1/2 size and Full Size - the link below is to a full size 3 pack - I have used a couple of them and got along well

https://www.adafruit.com/product/590

Power_Broker

I suggest learning how to use Eagle PCB CAD and design your own custom PCBs. Once you have the hang of the design process it's really easy to make boards for your project. Once the boards are designed, you can send the PCB gerber files to a PCB fab company for manufacturing.
"The desire that guides me in all I do is the desire to harness the forces of nature to the service of mankind."
   - Nikola Tesla

SteveMann

Any reason you have to use the NodeMCU?  Mabe the Wemos D1 Mini would have enough I/O pins to satisfy your project, and it comes without the header soldered.

Speaking of de-soldering, I've been soldering since before lead paint was illegal, and I wouldn't try to remove the header pins from the NodeMCU.

lastchancename

Keep all/any jumper wires, or any wire that could be loose - away from the power rails and mains wiring !

If a jumper comes loose and touches mains, a lot of nasty things can happen!
Experienced responders have a nose for laziness, (they were beginners once)... Sure, there are trolls, chest-beaters, and pretenders - but the help you'll get here is about as good as it gets - if you try to help youself!.

DJDJDJDJ

Thank you everyone.


The answer is "stripboard".
This is a very beautiful stripboard. I gave and could be very useful. I gave a quick look and ebay UK has only the standard ones. I will look for these for sure.


I suggest learning how to use Eagle PCB CAD and design your own custom PCBs. Once you have the hang of the design process it's really easy to make boards for your project. Once the boards are designed, you can send the PCB gerber files to a PCB fab company for manufacturing.
Thank you for the suggestion. I am still a bit shy on individual components. My ultimate goal is to get to designing my own boards but I am still learning and not moved on from modules to individual components.


Any reason you have to use the NodeMCU?  Mabe the Wemos D1 Mini would have enough I/O pins to satisfy your project, and it comes without the header soldered.

Speaking of de-soldering, I've been soldering since before lead paint was illegal, and I wouldn't try to remove the header pins from the NodeMCU.
I have never used Wemos D1 Mini. Just searched it and I think it would work for my project. I am using only 3 pins anyway. I will get one and try.

I agree on not trying to de-solder. With my skills I tried de-solding a factory attached micro-switch last week in a hair dryer. Needless to say, took me a long while. Perhaps my soldering iron does not get hot enough to melt factory solder easily.

Keep all/any jumper wires, or any wire that could be loose - away from the power rails and mains wiring !

If a jumper comes loose and touches mains, a lot of nasty things can happen!
I very much agree. I don't take any risks on the mains lines. They will be made solid no matter what. I only use proper connectors and wiring.

For jumper wires, I am not thinking I will simply solder them put some packaging foam on the remaining/open pins to keep them form accidental shortage.


lastchancename

Experienced responders have a nose for laziness, (they were beginners once)... Sure, there are trolls, chest-beaters, and pretenders - but the help you'll get here is about as good as it gets - if you try to help youself!.

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