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Topic: Transparent PCB's (Read 8004 times) previous topic - next topic

TheMindVirus

Would Arduino consider for the long term releasing Limited Edition versions of popular boards which are made on transparent/translucent plastic? A premium model could fetch a higher price while using less copper on the board (of which the shavings could be recycled).

I would be interested in buying several units in the long term after they could be mass produced.
Any idea on a potential release date (in years, less than infinite would be good).

The idea stemmed from a shield concept which could be made using a Voltera One and translucent frosted red Perspex. It makes the wiring more visible and gives a rarely-seen futuristic aesthetic to the product.

What are your thoughts?

ballscrewbob

Lots of products have "anniversary" or other special even goods.

I would support the idea.

Bob.

It may not be the answer you were looking for but its the one I am giving based on either experience, educated guess, google or the fact that you gave nothing to go with in the first place so I used my wonky crystal ball.

TheMindVirus

I was thinking something like this for the board (from SparkFun, translucent red breadboard):



...and this for the wiring (from 2013):

https://newatlas.com/georgia-tech-inkjet-printable-circuits/29731/

ballscrewbob

Whilst not against that idea I was thinking more of the Arduino boards not the breadboard.
A special version of the board would entice me more than the breadboard.

Bob.

It may not be the answer you were looking for but its the one I am giving based on either experience, educated guess, google or the fact that you gave nothing to go with in the first place so I used my wonky crystal ball.

RudolfAtRTC

A transparent PCB is from electric stadpoint not a good idea. The free board area is used for a copper layer connected to GND against noise.

westfw

Transparent plastics tend to fall into two categories:
  • lacking desirable high-temperature capabilities (first, you can't bond copper film to them, and then you can't solder to the copper without melting the board.)
  • Expensive polymers that aren't clear, normally come in very thin forms, anddon't have a lot of structural integrity (if only because of the thinness.)  (For example, flex PCBs made on yellow-brown Kapton polyimide.)


(normal "FR4" PCB material isn't a simple plastic.  It's usually fiberglass (mostly glass) infused with low-flamability epoxy resin.  I wouldn't be close to "transparent" even without any of the dyes that are  normally added.)

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