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Topic: Servo motor not rotating but vibrating (Read 346 times) previous topic - next topic

HizonPastor

Hello everyone, I've tried to connect a Servo Motor (SG5010) to my Arduino Uno R3
Using an external power supply (5V Power Bank) for the servo and connect the signal to pin 9
I test the servo using an Example Code that you can find in your arduino IDE servo namely Sweep
but the servo was continuously jerking, it rotates sometimes but not in a good way that the code was suppose to do after hours of solving the problem my Power Bank heated up, 3 hours later until now it was still heating up and the servo is still not working

Why the Power Bank heated up? and why is the servo motor not working?

sayHovis

Did you connect the grounds together?




HizonPastor

Thank you, No I didn't connect the GND external supply to the Arduino now I know what I must do but may I ask why do you have to connect the GND external supply to the Arduino

slipstick

The signal controlling the servo needs a fixed reference (ground). Since it goes from the Arduino to the servo they must both have the same ground reference. So you connect the two grounds together.

That's a general principle for almost all circuits. All the grounds must be common i.e. connected together.

Steve

HizonPastor

Hello I just did what the schematic says but its still not working
I've connected the GND --> Arduino --> Servo
the 5V --> Servo
Signal pin --> pin 9
I use a 5V power supply as external btw

slipstick

Let's be clear. I think you're saying the Arduino is powered with the USB cable and in addition you have a 5V power supply to power the servo. The power supply + is connected to servo + (red wire). The power supply - is connected to the servo - (brown wire) and to Arduino GND. Is that right so far?

What is the specification of the 5V power supply (or is it a power bank...they're not the same thing) ? That large servo will need at least 1A, possibly more.

Can you please post a picture of your set up that clearly shows all the components and the wiring. Sometimes problems can be caused by poor wiring e.g. connecting a servo via breadboard or with crocodile clips or just twisting wires together.

Steve

MarkT

Thank you, No I didn't connect the GND external supply to the Arduino now I know what I must do but may I ask why do you have to connect the GND external supply to the Arduino
The clue is the word circuit.  Current flows around a circuit.  So you always need two wires or more, current has to be able to return to complete a circuit.  Everywhere around a circuit the same current flows in lockstep.

A single connection means one circuit is only able to act as a (non-resonant) radio antenna for the other, a very different mode of behaviour, and completely useless in this context (low frequencies, low voltages, high currents).
[ I will NOT respond to personal messages, I WILL delete them, use the forum please ]

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