Go Down

Topic: Multiple GPS modules (Read 819 times) previous topic - next topic

NissanCedric

Maybe the teacher's request was just a light-hearted idea. It's not really possible for a monitoring system in that domain to be implemented without oversight and approval.

But it's a great idea to brainstorm. Lots of good solutions have come about by starting with a wild idea that would never work.

In Australia schemes are being developed to monitor herds of cattle and sheep. There's the potential to keep them within virtual boundaries by electrical stimulus. No physical fences needed. A mob could be moved from one area to another by remotely "moving" the virtual fences.

In theory the same could be done with the small people.

srnet

In Australia schemes are being developed to monitor herds of cattle and sheep. There's the potential to keep them within virtual boundaries by electrical stimulus.

In theory the same could be done with the small people.
So give an 'electrical stimulus' to shock the 'small people' when they stray too far ?

Was there not something like that in an episode of Star Trek, the punisment collar thing;

Bzzzzzzzzzzz -Argggggggg?

http://www.50dollarsat.info/
http://www.loratracker.uk/

Robin2

Maybe the teacher's request was just a light-hearted idea.
That only works if everyone understands that it is a joke. Clearly the OP believed it was a serious request.

Quote
But it's a great idea to brainstorm. Lots of good solutions have come about by starting with a wild idea that would never work.
Very true - but don't experiment with my kids, thank you.

Quote
In Australia schemes are being developed to monitor herds of cattle and sheep. There's the potential to keep them within virtual boundaries by electrical stimulus. No physical fences needed. A mob could be moved from one area to another by remotely "moving" the virtual fences.

In theory the same could be done with the small people.
I don't think it is proper to make a link between the two. The management of cattle and sheep is an economic issue and cattle and sheep have clear monetary values of not very large amounts. A system that works well to constrain 90% of a herd in the huge Australian spaces may make economic sense if the alternative cost of constraining the other 10% is far higher than their worth.

People expect kindergartens to secure 100% of their children 100% of the time, no ifs or buts. Serious questions will be asked over a scratched knee. Where does a lost child fit on that graph?

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

jacko91

Alright,
thanks for the input.
It was really just a general question from the teacher. So I talked to her. And she saw it rather as an additional safety feature, not sublimenting her responsibility.
I didnt plan on developing such a system on my own and giving it to the teacher. I just wanted to get some ideas on the way it could been done, as i didnt find anything out of the box.

Greetings

Go Up