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Topic: Marketing Bullsh** (Read 5985 times) previous topic - next topic

TomGeorge

#15
Nov 27, 2019, 12:15 pm Last Edit: Nov 27, 2019, 12:15 pm by TomGeorge
Don't forget;

Tom.. :o :o
Everything runs on smoke, let the smoke out, it stops running....

GoForSmoke

In 1979 I worked with a guy who bought a British sports car.
He would ask why the British drink their beer warm.
The answer is because they have Lucas refrigerators!


1) http://gammon.com.au/blink  <-- tasking Arduino 1-2-3
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial <-- techniques howto
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts
Your sketch can sense ongoing process events in time.
Your sketch can make events to control it over time.

Robin2

The answer is because they have Lucas refrigerators!
I have a couple of modern(ish) "Lucas" alternators on my boat. When they needed new brushes (they get a lot of use) and I opened them up all the castings said "Magneti Marelli"

I guess whoever owns the Lucas brand has advanced  their quality since the days of British sports cars.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

GoForSmoke

They had to, some British cars allegedly were using Ford electric parts in the 80's.

IMO Lucas gave many British men more excuses to tinker for decades, it might have been a golden age to some.

1) http://gammon.com.au/blink  <-- tasking Arduino 1-2-3
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial <-- techniques howto
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts
Your sketch can sense ongoing process events in time.
Your sketch can make events to control it over time.

Robin2

IMO Lucas gave many British men more excuses to tinker for decades, it might have been a golden age to some.
And Irish

Ahhh those were the days.

Though I have to say that my recollections of my first car (a 1966 mini) was the regular failure of the rubber hoses in the heating system. I think at least one needed to be replaced every year. And there was one tiny little bugger between the cylinder head and the block.

Maybe they were not the days :)

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

TomGeorge

#20
Nov 28, 2019, 10:59 am Last Edit: Nov 28, 2019, 11:07 am by TomGeorge
Though I have to say that my recollections of my first car (a 1966 mini) was the regular failure of the rubber hoses in the heating system. I think at least one needed to be replaced every year. And there was one tiny little bugger between the cylinder head and the block.
I had a 1974, Leyland Mini, that hose was still there, I could  change one in 20 minutes.
In my Uni days I worked at a service station, the boss got me half a dozen of the little blighters that were "soft" to keep in the boot, Mini didn't have a glovebox.
Made them easier to fit, but still a bugger at 10.00pm at night on the side of the road.
(Used to carry 2litres of water in the boot too :) :) :))

Ohh the days of "modern motoring"
I learned to drive with Lucas, Morris 1100, Morris Nomad 1500...  ah memories..

Tom..... :)
Everything runs on smoke, let the smoke out, it stops running....

GoForSmoke

And Irish

Ahhh those were the days.

Though I have to say that my recollections of my first car (a 1966 mini) was the regular failure of the rubber hoses in the heating system. I think at least one needed to be replaced every year. And there was one tiny little bugger between the cylinder head and the block.

Maybe they were not the days :)

...R
I dunno, I've been in a 60's mini with a mad driver sometime after 1AM. We took hard suburban development corners at speeds I'd have only tried on a bike after checking for loose stuff but madmen don't check! Those little wheels must be the trick, it was like the car was locked onto a track, incredible performance from a 4 wheeled sardine tin!

Cars like that are worth maintaining to the young and invulnerable. Tell me you never pushed the little beast?
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink  <-- tasking Arduino 1-2-3
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial <-- techniques howto
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts
Your sketch can sense ongoing process events in time.
Your sketch can make events to control it over time.

Robin2

Tell me you never pushed the little beast?
Compared to today's cars the cars of the 60's and 70' had skinny tyres so you could experience the limits of adhesion without going fast - hence safer for everyone.

At some stage I put an 1100 engine in the mini - mainly so I could have the 1100 style gearshift. Unfortunately the gearbox wouldn't stay in 4th so I had to change back to the porridge stirring gearbox. Then when I went to trade it in I had to go to great lengths to hide the hole in the transmission tunnel for the 1100 gearbox. Imagine my disgust when the dealer didn't even bother to look at the mini he was taking in part-ex :)

On another occasion I went in the mini with a friend to watch a rally in a forest. We  (and some others) were early so we drove up the forest track to find a good place to watch. One guy who had gone ahead had turned back and came round the corner towards me and, though I had stopped be slid gently (on icy stones) so the corner of his wing hit the mini headlight. The headlight went through the wing without breaking.

Fun times - but so long ago.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

GoForSmoke

It's a shame that Morris Motors got eaten, this year would have been the centennial. A Chinese company owns the name now....

I remember an old biker telling me that he bought a Triumph in 1960 after owning Harleys since 1946 or so. He was sick of the Harley refusing to start when his buddies were group riding, he told me, and loved how the Triumph always started no matter how much he beat it. He switched to Honda about 1965 and got a Goldwing the year they came out. I was at the dealer while my Yomamaha was getting worked on, the shop head introduced me as a year-round rider which wasn't quite true -- I only ran in snow a few times ever -- but he was gracious enough to tell me his experience.

60's Triumphs had Lucas electrics so how to explain that HIS "always worked"? I checked, there's an old Triumph site where they refer to Lucas as "The Prince of Darkness". But I get how it fits that the statistically good Lucas parts get shipped to America would only add to the dark mystique!

https://www.triumphrat.net/threads/lucas-jokes.102464/

Quote
If Lucas made guns wars wouldn't start

I've had a Lucas pacemaker for years and never had any prob..........

Lucas invented the intermittant wiper

Lucas invented the three position headlamp switch- off/smolder/ignite

Bell invented the telephone, Edison invented the phonograph, Lucas invented the short circuit.

* The Lucas motto: "Get home before dark."
Oh yeah... feelin the love right there buddy.


1) http://gammon.com.au/blink  <-- tasking Arduino 1-2-3
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial <-- techniques howto
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts
Your sketch can sense ongoing process events in time.
Your sketch can make events to control it over time.

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