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Topic: Where to find cheap micro SD cards (Read 437 times) previous topic - next topic

ningaman151

Dec 02, 2019, 12:31 pm Last Edit: Dec 02, 2019, 01:00 pm by ningaman151
Hello all,

In my projects I frequently use the df player and micro sd card module. I have some micro SD cards laying around but I don't want to use my expensive high capacity ones in my projects.

I think I have one 128 mb micro SD card (forgot where I got it from). Where can I find more of them to use in my projects. Capacity doesn't matter as long as it's more than a few mb.

TLDR: where can I find as cheap as possible micro SD cards?

Edit: forgot to mention, I'm in the UK.

Thanks!

pert

#1
Dec 02, 2019, 01:38 pm Last Edit: Dec 02, 2019, 01:39 pm by pert
I had the same problem. I was amazed to see how difficult it was to find the low capacity cards. I guess they just don't make them anymore and the old stock is not plentiful. When I was doing my shopping a couple years ago, I found that there are tons of Aliexpress listings with multiple capacities in the same listing. Unfortunately, Aliexpress shows the price of even the items of a multi-item listing that are not in stock. Sure enough in the dozens of listings I checked all of them had the cheap low capacity cards sold out. Then you have the jerks who put the card cases or adapters in the multi-item listings. It makes it extremely time consuming to shop for the lowest priced SD card.

Amazingly, I just did a quick search on eBay to refresh my memory as to whether the situation is the same there and found this listing which has 10 128 MB cards available for $0.90 USD/ea with free shipping:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/283682022252
No guarantees on whether it's any good. I know there are a lot of scam SD cards out there that lie about the capacity, but I doubt anyone would bother with 128 MB cards (unless they are very old ones still left over from when that was considered a nice capacity).

I haven't looked at Aliexpress to see what is happening now. My experience is that you can often find cheaper prices on Aliexpress, but compared to eBay, I have found that the way the website is set up makes it take way longer to do comparison shopping, I have many more orders that take months to show up (or never show up at all), and that when there is a problem with my order I much more often find the sellers and Aliexpress provide horrible customer service. So I'm kind of over the whole shopping on Aliexpress to save a little money thing, but if I wanted to buy something in quantity I would still check it and also I find that some items are only available on one or the other sites.

mikb55

Do you want SD cards where the actual capacity matches the spec, or would you be OK with fake cards where  the real capacity is some fraction of the spec?

If fakes are OK then Ebay is 'the place' to buy. Just characterise before use and make sure that the Arduino doesn't try to write beyond the end of the real capacity.

ShermanP

I ordered two 128MB microSD cards earlier this year on Ebay for about $1 each, and ended up receiving 256MB cards.  That listing is no longer up, and I suspect the supply of these small cards is dwindling.  But there appear to be a number ads for these little cards still up on Ebay, most with free international shipping from China.  These are probably going to be class 2 or 4 cards.  The ones I received worked just fine.  I don't think you'd have any problems with fakes at this size.

pert

My experience on eBay is that the sellers are very concerned with avoiding reports or negative feedback. The eBay system is usually set up in favor of the buyers. The algorithm is set up so that whether the seller's listings show up in the searches is dependent on their rating. A few disgruntled customers is the difference between success and failure for the sellers of products for which there is lots of competition. This doesn't guarantee that they are selling quality products, but almost always I find they are very good about working with me when there is a problem. Usually with the cheap Chinese products, they just let me keep the item that was unsatisfactory and then give me a refund or replacement. So if you end up getting shipped some "128 MB" SD cards that end up only having 64 MB true capacity, it could mean you just end up with some free cards that will still work OK for Arduino applications.

Aliexpress seems to be set up the opposite way, where all the policies are set up to favor the seller and so most sellers really don't care whether the customer is happy or not.

Paul__B

The algorithm is set up so that whether the seller's listings show up in the searches is dependent on their rating. A few disgruntled customers is the difference between success and failure for the sellers of products for which there is lots of competition.
Interesting!

There are some really funny things happening regarding "auctions".  The seller (not infrequently one which I actually tend to recommend here) starts an auction with a low price, then if bidding does not approach the usual selling price within the last 24 hours, it is suddenly withdrawn with a notice "because the item is no longer available".  It seems this clearly favours the seller.

This doesn't guarantee that they are selling quality products, but almost always I find they are very good about working with me when there is a problem. Usually with the cheap Chinese products, they just let me keep the item that was unsatisfactory and then give me a refund or replacement.
One seller has asked me to renege on a feedback where I gave 3 stars for a "Jeweller's" screwdriver set which was clearly of extremely poor quality and indeed, offered to refund me.  Since eBay states you cannot modify you feedback, I gather refunding is the method of erasing this feedback.  Something of a dilemma to me!  :smiley-roll-blue:

johnwasser

I got a bulk pack from Amazon to get a low price.

£14.99  (£1.499 each) for a 10-pack of 128MB:
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Capacity-MicroSD-Adapter-Computer-Organization/dp/B07S5K951Y

They also have 10 x 1GB for £24.99 (£2.499 each) 
or 10 x 4GB for £29.99 (£2.999 each).
Send Bitcoin tips to: 1G2qoGwMRXx8az71DVP1E81jShxtbSh5Hp

pert

There are some really funny things happening regarding "auctions".  The seller (not infrequently one which I actually tend to recommend here) starts an auction with a low price, then if bidding does not approach the usual selling price within the last 24 hours, it is suddenly withdrawn with a notice "because the item is no longer available".  It seems this clearly favours the seller.
That is a huge annoyance to me. There is some sense in eBay having this feature for legitimate cases, but it should always negatively affect the seller's rating, just as getting bad feedback, etc. does. Based on how often I have this happen to me, I don't think eBay does that.

I used to place a lot of bids on the electronic items that are listed with a starting price of $0.01, and have gotten a ridiculous amount of stuff for pennies this way, but it is still a good bit of work to place all those bids (since you lose most of the auctions). When the sellers weasel their way out of so many of the auctions that I would have won, it makes it so that it's not worth my time.

Years ago when I was starting my online business, I actually had a Pro Micro set up automatically bidding on hundreds of thousands of eBay listings for a few months in order to boost my feedback score (the sellers almost always leave the buyer positive feedback) and won a ridiculous amount of listings (mostly junk, but I found people to give all the stuff I didn't want to who loved it). You don't really win much of the good electronics stuff that way though. To do that, you usually need to bid a bit higher, and that doesn't work out well with an automated system because you end up winning a bunch of stuff that isn't really worth much more than what you paid, and that you don't really need.

ShermanP

Do Ebay auctions work like they used to - the winner actually pays one bidding increment over the runner up's bid?  If so, then sellers who withdraw the auction with 24 hours to go will miss out on all the people who only bid during the last few seconds.   I never understood why anyone would bid any earlier than that.  It just drives the price up, and gives other buyers information about what you would pay.

On the issue of feedback, I recently bought headers on an Ebay listing consisting of 4 male and 4 female header strips. They shipped only the male headers.  I asked them to ship the missing items, but they wouldn't do that even though the listing was still up and active with "more than 10" for sale, and instead offered to refund the entire purchase price.  I'm still thinking about feedback.  I won't leave positive feedback, but may leave none at all.  Despite their poor performance, I just have trouble leaving negative feedback on someone who refunds all my money without having to return the partial shipment.

pert

Do Ebay auctions work like they used to - the winner actually pays one bidding increment over the runner up's bid?
Yes.

I never understood why anyone would bid any earlier than that.  It just drives the price up, and gives other buyers information about what you would pay.
Because not everyone is that organized or motivated. It really depends on the auction. For an expensive or rare item, it's definitely worth some extra hassle, but for some <$5 electronic part, I'll just throw a bid on the auction while I'm thinking about it. Yes, I know there is bid sniping software you can use to automate all that, but I've never been so into auctions to motivate me to do the research on that. For the electronics parts from China, the buy it now is so incredibly cheap already that the potential savings on an auction is not really significant.

It really comes down to how much you value your time. For someone with a very small budget for their hobby, and no source of employment, it could well be worth spending a lot of time on eBay trying to save a few dollars on the parts for their project.

I'm still thinking about feedback.  I won't leave positive feedback, but may leave none at all.  Despite their poor performance, I just have trouble leaving negative feedback on someone who refunds all my money without having to return the partial shipment.
As someone who sells things online, I'm very reluctant to leave negative feedback. It's easy to forget that on the other end of the internet connection is a real person trying to earn a living. Negative feedback can have a significant impact on their ability to do that. I usually will only leave negative feedback if someone is trying to pull a scam on me. Then, I have no sympathy. If it's just a matter of incompetence, I'll usually just refrain from leaving feedback.

In your case, I would probably not leave negative feedback. In the case of someone selling me SD cards with fake capacity, I might wait to see whether they took down the listing, but would probably leave negative feedback. I think it's a good idea to wait on taking any official action while you're still in negotiations with the seller about resolving the issue, because then you are able to hold the prospect of reporting them to eBay and leaving negative feedback over their head.

Paul__B

I never understood why anyone would bid any earlier than that.  It just drives the price up, and gives other buyers information about what you would pay.
I have a life!  :smiley-eek: And while I may look at eBay very regularly, I have a business, a family, and a need for sleep, not adequately filled!

I just can't see how this "last few seconds" trick has any advantage whatsoever; I think it is imaginary.  :smiley-roll-sweat: The auction algorithm simply selects the highest bid at any moment, whether it is in the last second or last week; you cannot alter that so how does "bid sniping software" - fascinating as that is - make it any different?  There is no "going, going ..." hesitancy as in a real estate sale.


pert

It has an advantage because humans are illogical. If we were perfectly logical, we would bid the absolute maximum price we were willing to pay for the item and then if we get outbid then it wasn't meant to be. But what actually happens is that when someone gets outbid they realize how much they really wanted the item and then they go back and bid again at a higher price. By bidding at the last possible second, you don't give them time to do that and so you win more auctions and get lower prices on the auctions you win.

Paul__B


ShermanP

I don't know when I last actually bid on an Ebay auction.  It seems every time I run across an auction for something I need, it has four days to run.  So I almost always do Buy It Now.  But sniping definitely does work.  If you bid the normal way, the other bidder sees your bid and then enters his own higher bid, and all you've accomplished is bidding up the price.  But if you wait till the last few seconds, he doesn't have time to respond, and you may win at a lower price.

The big difference is the price you pay.  If the two of you trade bids all the way up to $30, and you win at that price, you will actually pay one bidding increment above his last bid.  If his last bid was $29, then you will indeed pay $30 if the bidding increment is $1.

If instead you wait until the end to respond to his initial $10 bid, you can still bid $30, but you will only pay $11.

So the way to do it is to decide the most you really want to pay for the item, and have your sniping software enter that bid with five seconds to go.  If you win, you won't pay more than your bid, but could pay substantially less.  Of course all the other snipers are doing the same thing, so there's no guarantee that sniping will benefit you.  And there are circumstances where the bidding increment can interfere with your last-second bid, and cost you the auction.  But I think it's generally recognized than sniping is the optimum behaviour for buyers.  Of course sellers hate it.


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