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Topic: New Nano Every 21 Volts (Read 591 times) previous topic - next topic

joyce10

New Nano Every has a Voltage in at 21 volts max can this be powered by a 12 volt battery!

PaulRB

Yes, 21V is the maximum, 4.5V is the minimum, so 12V is ok.

raschemmel

You can do that but regulator wiill run hot dissipatingthe heat. Due to the low cost, most people just buy a dc to dc converter to put between
the high input voltage and set it's output to about
2.5 to 3V above theonboard regulator voltage
so if that's 3.3V then set it 6V.

PaulRB

@raschemmel the Every has a dc-dc convertor: mpm3610. So hopefully overheating won't be the problem you would expect from linear regulators. It's an interesting chip: built-in inductor. I wonder if a tiny inductor has been embedded in the package or actually on the silicon? Either way, how the hell do they do that?

raschemmel

#4
Dec 14, 2019, 07:47 pm Last Edit: Dec 14, 2019, 07:48 pm by raschemmel
The gold taget in the PVD sputtering tool at
AMG cost $50,000. ( 16"x 1" ? circular slab).
They lay down as many layers of gold or whatever
material it is in a coil pattern . They use silicon
insilator material where necessary. AMG made disk drive heads back in '92. They can probable
put an inductor on silicon these days.

CrossRoads

If not on silicon, then at least on PCB material. Thin layer with conductor, stack multiple layers up for the incuctance needed. Can do transformers that way too.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

PaulRB

Can do transformers that way too.
Wouldn't transformers need a ferrous core? Otherwise they would be horrendously inefficient, wouldn't they?

SteveMann

Wouldn't transformers need a ferrous core? Otherwise they would be horrendously inefficient, wouldn't they?
Not at high frequencies, such as in a switching PSU.

JohnRob

#8
Dec 15, 2019, 06:36 am Last Edit: Dec 15, 2019, 06:37 am by JohnRob
As was stated above 12V in should be fine.  I would not be comfortable putting 21V into my nano.

The cause for concern is the Nano runs on 5V.   The regulator must "absorb" the difference between 12V and 5V.  What the regulator has to absorb is turned into heat.   If you start to add a lot of LED's or things that need current to your nano the amount of heat increases.

At any case it is easy to tell if you are asking the regulator to absorb too much. Simply put your finger on the regulator.  If it is really uncomfortable holding it there you are likely asking it to absorb too much.

In the screen shot, the regulator is in the red circle.

Good luck
John


Please do not PM me with thread based messages.  If your thoughts are worth responding,  the group should benefit from your insight.

Wawa

The Arduino designers made IMHO a HUGE mistake calling several unrelated designs a "Nano".

The "EVERY" has a switching power supply, the common Nano v3.0 (pictured in post#8) has not.

The Every uses the same fully integrated DC/DC converter as the Due.
Leo..

raschemmel

#10
Dec 15, 2019, 08:16 am Last Edit: Dec 15, 2019, 08:18 am by raschemmel
Quote
The Arduino designers made IMHO a HUGE mistake calling several unrelated designs a "Nano".
I may be oversimplifying but I thought the only thing "Nano" meant was SMALL (in general )  (at least everywhere else in the world)

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